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DVB-T & ASTC : is there any standard for a TV set cryptoca..

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Anonymous
November 6, 2004 3:32:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

DVB-T & ASTC : is there any standard for a TV set cryptocard(s)?

One card is for decryption / authorisation, the other for same or other
consumer uses? (As in Freeview in the UK)
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 4:00:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

"HireMe.geek.nz" <mikehack@u.washington.edu> wrote in message
news:cmi26m$fv1$1@gnus01.u.washington.edu...
> DVB-T & ASTC : is there any standard for a TV set cryptocard(s)?
>
> One card is for decryption / authorisation, the other for same or other
> consumer uses? (As in Freeview in the UK)

Many DVB-T integrated TV sets, and some set top boxes, in the UK come with a
Common Interface slot - which is pretty much the same form-factor as a PC
Card (aka PCMCIA) used in PC laptops (not sure which class- think Class II)
This CI slot accepts a Conditional Access Module, in the same way that DVB-S
receivers do, which implements at least one (some can do more than one)
decryption algorithm. This CAM may also, itself, have a smart card slot to
accept a consumer subscription card to authorise decryption - you plug your
smartcard into your CAM and your CAM into the CI slot in your receiver/IDTV.

In the UK CAMs are now available to allow UK IDTVs to receive the payTV
TopUPTV service broadcast on DTT (DVB-T). However although TUTV is
broadcast on DVB-T it is not broadcast on any of the 4 the Freeview or BBC
muxes AIUI - it is restricted to the 2 non-Freeview muxes operated by ITV/C4
and SDN/C5 - if you want to be accurate. (There are no encrypted Freeview
broadcasts in the UK...)

Some DVB receivers have an integrated CAM (in the case of some receivers
this is implemented purely in software, with no extra hardware required)
rather than a CI slot to plug in a 3rd party device. With these type of
receivers you just plug in the smart card and don't have to worry about CI
slots and buying CAMs. This is the case in the UK with the Pace DTVA and
TopUpTV - you just pop your TUTV authorisation card in the reader in the
base of your DTVA.

So there is an interface standard for DVB - but different broadcasters can
chose different encryption schemes, requiring different CAMs for decryption.
Not sure how much encrypted DVB-T there is in the rest of the world though -
don't think there is any in Aus, and the TopUpTV stuff in the UK is only a
small proportion.

As for ATSC - there is a CableCard standard connection scheme for
cable-ready DTVs I believe (and I believe satellite DTV is usually
proprietary requiring specific receivers, just like Sky Digital in the UK)
However the 8VSB over-the-air ATSC DTV and HDTV stuff is AFAIK
un-encrypted - so doesn't require a decryption interface etc. I'm sure
others will correct me if I'm wrong. I'm not clear if the CableCard system
in the US is similar to a CI slot (so requires a Conditional Access Module
specific to the encryption scheme deployed by the cable co), or if it is
more akin to a SmartCard slot with the TV containing the CAM stuff
internally. (Or maybe it is now possible to integrate a CAM into a smart
card!?)


Steve
Anonymous
November 6, 2004 4:19:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

Stephen Neal wrote:
> However the 8VSB over-the-air ATSC DTV and HDTV stuff is AFAIK
> un-encrypted - so doesn't require a decryption interface etc. I'm sure

The ATSC standard does allow for conditional access, and there is very
limited use of CA. A firm called "USDTV" offers subscription access to
a number of channels normally available only over cable/satellite; the
channels are transmitted as part of a multiplex with at least one free
channel. To my knowledge it's operating only in the Salt Lake City area
at this time.

Their STB's are available nationwide, and I have one. (of course, it
only receives the free channels here in Nashville) The instructions
make no mention of a card slot - indeed, the photo of the unit in the
manual doesn't show a card slot - but my unit has one. Credit-card
size, looks like it takes the same type of card as the DSS satellite
boxes. (DirecTV/Dish Network) I know nothing further about their
authorization scheme.
--
Doug Smith W9WI
Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66
http://www.w9wi.com
Related resources
November 6, 2004 7:40:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

"Stephen Neal" <stephen.neal@nospam.as-directed.com> wrote in message
news:cmihte$j92$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
<
> So there is an interface standard for DVB - but different broadcasters can
> chose different encryption schemes, requiring different CAMs for decryption.
> Not sure how much encrypted DVB-T there is in the rest of the world though -
> don't think there is any in Aus, and the TopUpTV stuff in the UK is only a
> small proportion.
>
> As for ATSC - there is a CableCard standard connection scheme for cable-ready
> DTVs I believe (and I believe satellite DTV is usually proprietary requiring
> specific receivers, just like Sky Digital in the UK) However the 8VSB
> over-the-air ATSC DTV and HDTV stuff is AFAIK un-encrypted - so doesn't
> require a decryption interface etc. I'm sure others will correct me if I'm
> wrong. I'm not clear if the CableCard system in the US is similar to a CI
> slot (so requires a Conditional Access Module specific to the encryption
> scheme deployed by the cable co), or if it is more akin to a SmartCard slot
> with the TV containing the CAM stuff internally. (Or maybe it is now possible
> to integrate a CAM into a smart card!?)

The idea is (was?) to have a POD Module for cable services, this is essentially
the equivalent to a CAM so crypto is upgradeable and interchangeable however I
believe the module itself also performed the job as the token (i.e. smartcard).

http://www.cablelabs.com/news/newsletter/SPECS/MayJune_...

There was dispute about control of the EPG, copy protection, broadcast flags,
etc so things tended to settle on fixing a standard interface (DVI/HDMI) then
applying for a seperate STB.


Az.
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 4:34:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

Doug Smith W9WI wrote:
> Stephen Neal wrote:
>> However the 8VSB over-the-air ATSC DTV and HDTV stuff is AFAIK
>> un-encrypted - so doesn't require a decryption interface etc. I'm
>> sure
>
> The ATSC standard does allow for conditional access, and there is very
> limited use of CA. A firm called "USDTV" offers subscription access
> to a number of channels normally available only over cable/satellite;
> the channels are transmitted as part of a multiplex with at least one
> free channel. To my knowledge it's operating only in the Salt Lake
> City area at this time.
>
> Their STB's are available nationwide, and I have one. (of course, it
> only receives the free channels here in Nashville) The instructions
> make no mention of a card slot - indeed, the photo of the unit in the
> manual doesn't show a card slot - but my unit has one. Credit-card
> size, looks like it takes the same type of card as the DSS satellite
> boxes. (DirecTV/Dish Network) I know nothing further about their
> authorization scheme.

Aaah - I wondered how USDTV was running their service. That makes sense.
The MPEG2 system used by both DVB and ATSC supports conditional access, and
I guess the USDTV receivers have an integrated conditional access module (in
the same way as Sky Digital boxes do in the UK), with just a consumer smart
card required for authorisation? (In Europe some schemes don't even require
a card, instead receivers are addressed over-the-air to authorise
reception.)

I guess there is nothing to stop other ATSC stations, well those who aren't
HD and have a lot of space, from broadcasting services that are encrypted -
though I don't know if the FCC allow this? In Australia there are quite
strict rules about what services can and can't be carried in their DVB-T
system.

In the UK our Freeview system is FTA on DTT, but there are two non-Freeview
multiplexes which run at a higher data rate (and less robust transmission
scheme) which whilst mainly FTA also carry a few pay-TV services which are
encrypted. These are nationwide services though - and so available
everywhere that a decent DVB-T signal is available.

Steve
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 6:22:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

Stephen Neal wrote:
> Doug Smith W9WI wrote:
>
>>Stephen Neal wrote:
>>
>>>However the 8VSB over-the-air ATSC DTV and HDTV stuff is AFAIK
>>>un-encrypted - so doesn't require a decryption interface etc. I'm
>>>sure
>>
>>The ATSC standard does allow for conditional access, and there is very
>>limited use of CA. A firm called "USDTV" offers subscription access
>>to a number of channels normally available only over cable/satellite;
>>the channels are transmitted as part of a multiplex with at least one
>>free channel. To my knowledge it's operating only in the Salt Lake
>>City area at this time.
>>
>>Their STB's are available nationwide, and I have one. (of course, it
>>only receives the free channels here in Nashville) The instructions
>>make no mention of a card slot - indeed, the photo of the unit in the
>>manual doesn't show a card slot - but my unit has one. Credit-card
>>size, looks like it takes the same type of card as the DSS satellite
>>boxes. (DirecTV/Dish Network) I know nothing further about their
>>authorization scheme.
>
>
> Aaah - I wondered how USDTV was running their service. That makes sense.
> The MPEG2 system used by both DVB and ATSC supports conditional access, and
> I guess the USDTV receivers have an integrated conditional access module (in
> the same way as Sky Digital boxes do in the UK), with just a consumer smart
> card required for authorisation? (In Europe some schemes don't even require
> a card, instead receivers are addressed over-the-air to authorise
> reception.)
>
> I guess there is nothing to stop other ATSC stations, well those who aren't
> HD and have a lot of space, from broadcasting services that are encrypted -
> though I don't know if the FCC allow this? In Australia there are quite
> strict rules about what services can and can't be carried in their DVB-T
> system.

It is allowed by the FCC. The broadcaster is required to deliver one
NTSC quality program free using MPEG2 and then can use any remaining
spectrum to do, for example, MPEG4 encrypted programming.

Bob Miller
>
> In the UK our Freeview system is FTA on DTT, but there are two non-Freeview
> multiplexes which run at a higher data rate (and less robust transmission
> scheme) which whilst mainly FTA also carry a few pay-TV services which are
> encrypted. These are nationwide services though - and so available
> everywhere that a decent DVB-T signal is available.
>
> Steve
>
>
Anonymous
November 8, 2004 10:13:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 13:34:41 -0000, "Stephen Neal"
<stephen.neal@nospam.please.as-directed.com> wrote:


>Aaah - I wondered how USDTV was running their service. That makes sense.
>The MPEG2 system used by both DVB and ATSC supports conditional access, and
>I guess the USDTV receivers have an integrated conditional access module (in
>the same way as Sky Digital boxes do in the UK), with just a consumer smart
>card required for authorisation? (In Europe some schemes don't even require
>a card, instead receivers are addressed over-the-air to authorise
>reception.)

ALL conditional access systems for home subscription control access
upon commands from the provider, sent as control packets muxed with
the MPEG stream(s), in the VBI or HBI, or a separate data carrier.
The smartcard simply stores apd processes the decryption algorithms.
Providers that don't use smartcards either use simple algorithms, or
process keys on an asic/micro integrated into the system (as
Motorola's DCII does)
Anonymous
November 13, 2004 6:03:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.dbs.canada,alt.satellite.tv.crypt,alt.tv.tech.hdtv,alt.video.digital-tv,sci.engr.television.advanced (More info?)

Stephen Neal wrote:
> I guess there is nothing to stop other ATSC stations, well those who aren't
> HD and have a lot of space, from broadcasting services that are encrypted -
> though I don't know if the FCC allow this? In Australia there are quite
> strict rules about what services can and can't be carried in their DVB-T
> system.

As I understand it, U.S. DTT stations are required to carry one FTA
unencrypted service. Once they do that, they can do whatever they want
with the rest of their bandwidth.

However, if they carry any subscription services, they're required to
pay taxes on the revenue from those services.
--
Doug Smith W9WI
Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66
http://www.w9wi.com
!