Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Overclocking (can be) harmful to your stability...

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
April 16, 2007 1:33:16 PM

those things happens when stability test is not followed as a step to overclocking.

i have a san diego core 3700+ overclocked to 2.9ghz and i have never even seen this failure.
my ram is running lower than it's maximum speed and with and appropriate latency
April 16, 2007 1:34:51 PM

See? It's all of you overclocking maniacs out there that are making Windows look bad!!! And all this time we thought it was Bill's fault...

I especially liked the part about the people with the OC'd rigs that had no clue...
Related resources
April 16, 2007 1:37:01 PM

>And all this time we thought it was Bill's fault

Yeah, that made me chuckle, as well :) 
April 16, 2007 1:43:29 PM

Overclocking (can be) harmful to your stability...

well no sh*t.

that's why it's not something noobs should be doing.

Valis
April 16, 2007 1:48:55 PM

I liked this bit the best -

quote-
But it takes only one false positive to get people saying, "Oh, there goes Microsoft blaming other people for its buggy software again."

Which is exactly what he's doing here is it not?

I've ran OC'd machines on windows at home for years without any problems, stock machines at work are always spitting out these types of crashes. In reality windows is ok as long as you treat it like a baby - you know; feed it, bathe it and wipe its arse every day. Longest stable xp install at home has lasted me 3 years and counting!
April 16, 2007 1:49:02 PM

Quote:
Overclocking (can be) harmful to your stability...

well no sh*t.

that's why it's not something noobs should be doing.

Valis


Then how are you supposed to start overclocking. Let me guess you where a pro from the very beginning.
a b K Overclocking
April 16, 2007 1:59:47 PM

Well duh! Anytime you run hardware over it's rated performance level of course you run a higher risk of instablility, and it may only show up in certain programs or applications.
Overclocking is a great way to get the max performance out of your PC, but it has to be done in steps, done correctly, with the correct mix of parts, and thoroughly tested at each step.
Their are a huge number of people who have successful overclocks that are rock solid. But for every successful overclocked PC I am willing to bet there are a dozen people overclocking PC's that may appear to be running okay, but are not 100% stable. If you are gaming, and the game occasionally freezes or locks up, a lot of people think nothing of it and just reboot and pick up right where they left off. They are completely content unless the problem starts occuring frequently.
If you are working on a spreadsheet or presentation that has taken hours or even weeks to build, and your too-far overclocked PC crashes and corrupts the file, or even worse, like fries something, that is a different story to have to deal with!
April 16, 2007 2:07:32 PM

News flash : If you push hardware beyond its recommended specs then it may not always behave as advertised. :roll:

Whats more interesting is. How did did Ms contact 10 'anonymous' bug report senders.
April 16, 2007 2:12:56 PM

Quote:
Overclocking (can be) harmful to your stability...

well no sh*t.

that's why it's not something noobs should be doing.

Valis


Then how are you supposed to start overclocking. Let me guess you where a pro from the very beginning.

Overclocking is an art AND a science and as with any other discipline you have to learn how to do it. Start slowly with mild oc'ing and learn some more then try and go higher on you oc. Example : I've been into overclocking ever since the pentium 1 days when you had to do it with jumpers 'cause there were no board that would allow bios oc'ing. So I know a lot about fsb oc'ing and stuff. When I got my A64 at first I could not oc it more than 200 mhz from its 2000 stock speed. Well I read and read some more and I learned how to oc an A64 properly now it runs at 2500mhz stable.
April 16, 2007 2:22:58 PM

he does have a point, but maybe msoft should upload system specs along with the error information to see overclocking crashes, then they can be disregarded in actual data. Overclocking would cause what we like to call "outliers" in statistical data, so as a general assumption, outliers should (usually) be ignored. The whole bit about local stores is interesting though. I dont think stores should sell computers pre overclocked unless advertised as so, and showing the risk factors involved with overclocking. But otherwise most of the crashes were probably related to stability testing.... since overclocking is alot of trial and error
April 16, 2007 2:36:35 PM

Well if you oc it's 'cause you want max performance out of your cpu , no ? Then any oc'er should disable error reporting service :lol:  since it only consumes cpu cycles for nothin.
April 16, 2007 3:46:42 PM

Quote:
Overclocking (can be) harmful to your stability...

well no sh*t.

that's why it's not something noobs should be doing.

Valis


Then how are you supposed to start overclocking. Let me guess you where a pro from the very beginning.

my first o'clock was the famous celeron 300A, from 300mhz to 450mhz, and i read and researched so much BEFORE i attempted it that while it was my first time i was not a noob.

and i went up in small increments, testing stability, when i hit an unstable point, i went back one level. seems like a no-brainer.

Valis
April 16, 2007 3:48:21 PM

Quote:
Overclocking (can be) harmful to your stability...

well no sh*t.

that's why it's not something noobs should be doing.

Valis


Then how are you supposed to start overclocking. Let me guess you where a pro from the very beginning.

Overclocking is an art AND a science and as with any other discipline you have to learn how to do it. Start slowly with mild oc'ing and learn some more then try and go higher on you oc. Example : I've been into overclocking ever since the pentium 1 days when you had to do it with jumpers 'cause there were no board that would allow bios oc'ing. So I know a lot about fsb oc'ing and stuff. When I got my A64 at first I could not oc it more than 200 mhz from its 2000 stock speed. Well I read and read some more and I learned how to oc an A64 properly now it runs at 2500mhz stable.

exactly. people on these boards dont realize that there was a time before you could go to thg and post "omg, help me i'm trying to overclock!".
you actually had to work a bit at it.

perhaps if people actually worked a bit at it and didn't jump to the "how's my build" posts they would learn something.

Valis
April 16, 2007 5:20:15 PM

@ Nova Thunder...I think Rubber is being ironic :roll:
!