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Intel processor introduction question

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  • Processors
  • Intel
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April 17, 2007 1:16:25 PM

Hi there,

I was wondering if anybody knew how Intel tends to introduce a new series of Processors (e.g. Core 2, or Nehalem). What I want to know is wether they release the top models first or if they tend to launch a complete new line?

I ask this because I'm thinking of upgrading my machine somewhere near the end of this year but it seems somewhat silly to spend a load of cash on something (a Peryn?) I won't be able to upgrade afterwards. On the other hand it's also silly to wait for months for the latest and greatest only to realize that the new stuff costs 799$ and 999$ (which is more than I'm willing to spend on a CPU.

Kind regards,

Lyngvi.

More about : intel processor introduction question

April 17, 2007 1:24:30 PM

Quote:
Hi there,

I was wondering if anybody knew how Intel tends to introduce a new series of Processors (e.g. Core 2, or Nehalem). What I want to know is wether they release the top models first or if they tend to launch a complete new line?

I ask this because I'm thinking of upgrading my machine somewhere near the end of this year but it seems somewhat silly to spend a load of cash on something (a Peryn?) I won't be able to upgrade afterwards. On the other hand it's also silly to wait for months for the latest and greatest only to realize that the new stuff costs 799$ and 999$ (which is more than I'm willing to spend on a CPU.

Kind regards,

Lyngvi.



Well in general costs seem to go down for every category of computing, lowend, mainstream or high end. So in general when you buy a CPU you will pay almost the same amount for a top of the line CPU 1 year from now or 2 years.

If you're want to make a smart purchase buy the components that have best (perf/price) * upgradability. Sometimes that can really be a gamble.
April 17, 2007 10:46:43 PM

As long as you get a new revision motherboard with the 1333FSB capability, then you could buy a cheap but highly overclockable chip from the current range such as E6300 or E6400, and then upgrade your chip to a penryn model later in the year. All the current boards support Quad Core as well so thatis covered too.

Make sure you get a decent set of components (ram, psu etc) as well and u will be set for a least a few years.

As far as releases go, they usually release bottom and mid range first, and paper release the top models at the same time, but you will find the top models are in short or no supply for the forst month or two. However, I say usually and until it happens nobody knows. Remember thet recently Intel have managed to do some very strange things such as "get it right" and they may have a full range for release at the same time.

Don't forget there is a refresh release some with the 6*20 chips coming out.
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April 18, 2007 10:08:32 AM

Thank you for your answers. Last CPU I bought was an AMD 3500+, about 2 weeks before they introduced the new socket. This is something I really want to avoid this time.

Quote:
Don't forget there is a refresh release some with the 6*20 chips coming out.


Is this Peryn you're talking about or something else still? While Peryn seems nice the idea that Intel will come up with a new socket 3-6 months later somewhat scares me away from them.
In an ideal world, I'd buy a new machine with a 500$ Nehalem as soon as they're released and then upgrade to a cheap octo-core near the end of 2009. Yes, I like to plan ahead :D 

Lyngvi.
April 18, 2007 11:45:07 PM

The E6320 and 6420 are Allandale chips with 4mb cache (which I would have thought would make them conroe, but go figure) clocked at 1.86ghz and 2.13 ghz respectively.

Penryn and westmere (which follows penryn) are the same socket and will cover off the next 2 -3 years so dont panic.

Nehalem and Gesher look like they will be on a different board as they are copying AMD to a certain extent in the way that the FSB is handled point to point aka hypertransport and using an on die memory controller so goodbye northbridge.

This article has a pretty good explanation:


http://www.trustedreviews.com/cpu-memory/review/2007/03...
April 19, 2007 2:24:11 AM

Quote:
The E6320 and 6420 are Allandale chips with 4mb cache (which I would have thought would make them conroe, but go figure) clocked at 1.86ghz and 2.13 ghz respectively.

In another thread, the following explanation was given (forget by who)
Allendale = 800 FSB
Conroe = 1066 FSB.
Remember, e6300 and e6400 are Conroes with 2MB cache (some have 2MB truly, others have 4 with half disabled).
April 19, 2007 7:43:21 AM

Quote:
The E6320 and 6420 are Allandale chips with 4mb cache


*slaps forehead* I read 6*20 as... well, six times twenty = 120 :oops: 

From the article you linked I'm somewhat confused with what you wrote. The way I read it, Peryn will have the same socket as C2D does now. Then Nehalem and Westmere will have a different socket because of the FBS thing. And then Gesher might have a new socket again although that's too early to tell I suppose.

Best for me would probably be to wait for Nehalem in 2008 and then upgrade to Westmere end-2009. Although with my luck, whatever motherboard I buy won't support it :evil: 

All that just to play games really, since everything else is more than fast enough, even compiling that little bit of code I write.

Lyngvi.
April 19, 2007 1:21:33 PM

Quote:
The E6320 and 6420 are Allandale chips with 4mb cache (which I would have thought would make them conroe, but go figure) clocked at 1.86ghz and 2.13 ghz respectively.

In another thread, the following explanation was given (forget by who)
Allendale = 800 FSB
Conroe = 1066 FSB.
Remember, e6300 and e6400 are Conroes with 2MB cache (some have 2MB truly, others have 4 with half disabled).

Hi Senor Bob. The E6300 and E6400 are also Allendale with 1066fsb and 2mb cache. The E4300 and E4400 are Allendale with 800fsb and 2mb cache. However early E6300 and 6400 chips were classed as conroe. So now we have Allendale with 1066fsb and 4mb cache.

And to add th the confusion, apparently different sources at Intel say that anything with 1066 FSB is conroe, whislt others say that the newer low end end C2D's are Allendale. Sh*t, even Intel don't know!!!

At least its not totally confusing!!!!
April 19, 2007 1:29:34 PM

Quote:
Hi Senor Bob. The E6300 and E6400 are also Allendale with 1066fsb and 2mb cache. The E4300 and E4400 are Allendale with 800fsb and 2mb cache. However early E6300 and 6400 chips were classed as conroe. So now we have Allendale with 1066fsb and 4mb cache.

And to add th the confusion, apparently different sources at Intel say that anything with 1066 FSB is conroe, whislt others say that the newer low end end C2D's are Allendale. Sh*t, even Intel don't know!!!

At least its not totally confusing!!!!


I don't think so :wink:
Originall E6300 and E6400 were manufactured using the same mask with E6600 / E6700 (Conroe mask, Stepping B0), but with 2MB of shared L2 cache disabled.
Now E6300 and E6400 are manufactured using the same mask with E4300 / E4400 (Allendale mask, Stepping L0).
April 19, 2007 1:33:30 PM

What do you mean "I dont think so", You just agreed with me!!!

Explain further if u no something juicy :lol: 
April 19, 2007 1:34:40 PM

Quote:
What do you mean "I dont think so", You just agreed with me!!!

Explain further if u no something juicy :lol: 


Totally different from you :wink:
Conroe: 4MB shared L2 cache die
Allendale: 2MB shared L2 cache die

But E6300 / E6400 were manufactured using Conroe die but now Allendale die.
April 19, 2007 9:59:43 PM

Quote:
What do you mean "I dont think so", You just agreed with me!!!

Explain further if u no something juicy :lol: 


Totally different from you :wink:
Conroe: 4MB shared L2 cache die
Allendale: 2MB shared L2 cache die

But E6300 / E6400 were manufactured using Conroe die but now Allendale die.

And if you now look at the specs of e6320 and 6420 they have 4mb L2 cashe yet are called Allandale!!!!

So, back to my point, why are they not called conroe??
April 19, 2007 11:18:10 PM

Quote:
Hi there,

I was wondering if anybody knew how Intel tends to introduce a new series of Processors (e.g. Core 2, or Nehalem).


They usually have parades.
April 19, 2007 11:19:19 PM

Quote:
And if you now look at the specs of e6320 and 6420 they have 4mb L2 cashe yet are called Allandale!!!!

So, back to my point, why are they not called conroe??


Any pics for that?
April 20, 2007 12:21:30 AM



I don't think this is credible enough. 8O

I just want a CPU-Z image. :wink:

Erm ok, how about you use google and then find the other umpteen thousand links to 6320/6420 Allendales.

What do you want me to do, send you one!!!!!!?????
April 20, 2007 12:34:13 AM

Yeah, and as you can see the Cpuz is giving out wrong information about the chip so it can't be counted. And as you see on your other link, some people are saying these new parts are conroe. So you see why my original post was correct. Numerous sites describe 6320 and 6420 as Allendale, also some describe them as conroe.

Even Intels site doesnt clear it up as they don't seem to mention conroe or allendale against any chips!!
April 20, 2007 12:36:23 AM

One things for definate, they are the same price as the 6300/6400 chips with extra cache so thats good for everyone!!

I would get one but it looks like the E6400 I have got could be an absolute overclocking monster, hopefully find out tomorrow when my new waterblock arrives (if it ever bloody arrives!!)
April 20, 2007 1:18:27 AM

Buying a motherboard from Intel with the hope/expectation of being able to upgrade later to a new series of CPU is always a crapshhot, so as they say about mutual funds "past performance is no guarantee of future returns" - that being said, generally speaking, if you buy intels top of the line motherboard series, ~~usually~~ you can upgrade to the next CPU series with just a BIOS update.

For example when the Intel 875 series came out, you ran your Northwood for a year then had the option to <<cough>> "upgrade" to a Prescott.

945 boards first used for the Penium D series will usually run a Conroe, some however are limited to an 800 mhz FSB, (The 945 chipset is basically a 945 opened up to the 1066 FSB)

Similarly, todays 975 motherboards require just a BIOS flash to run the new 1333 FSB chips, and the prototype Penryns are running on 975 chipsets, (somewhat modified it seems) so there is a ~~chance~~ Prenyns will run on a 975.

Very soon Intel will start shipping the new X38 series chipsets and these are anticipated to run Penryn as well.

Nehalem is a totally different puppy.

The exact details are a bit scare but it looks like Nehalem will have both CSI (a.k.a. hypertransport) versions and FSB versions as well.

It is ~~barely~~ possible that X38 boards will run the FSB Nehalems, but I just don't see how it is even conceptually possible they would run the CSI Nehalems.
April 20, 2007 1:26:32 AM

X38 wont run Nahelem. X38 has north bridge and includes memory controller in the chipset, Nahelem is like Athlon64 in that it will use hypertransport (which needs a new chipset) and on die memory controller so the north bridge dissapears. So you are right about the limited time until we have to change boards again to keep at the cutting edge.
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