Apache Setup

I have a Fedora Core 4 machine with Apache (system configured per this tutorial: http://www.howtoforge.net/perfect_setup_fedora_core_4 ). I placed my homepage files in /var/www/html/ and now can access them from my local network as http://192.168.0.150/index.htm and so forth.

The question is, how can I access these files from outside my network, effectively serving the website on this machine? Can it be done while the server is behind my router? The router is a D-Link DI-524 and I have set the HTTP(TCP 80/80) "Virtual Server" in the router configuration to 192.168.0.150 . Should I use a switch to split the connection from the ISP to my router and the server? Can this serving be done without my registering a domain name?

Thanks,
Jo
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  1. Steps to contact your machine from the outside world:

    Forward the desired port in the router/gateway/NAT device (sounds like you've done this already)

    Find the external address of your machine. Unfortunately, with most ISPs this is dynamic (more about resolutions to this later). Here's a diagram for exactly what I'm talking about:

    192.168.X.X X.X.X.X
    |Home machine|<=====>|Router|<=====>|Modem|<==>ISP
    [/code:1:b00bc09380]

    You know the interior address (192.168.0.150), you can find out the external address (that known by the router and the modem, X.X.X.X) by going to the following site: [url]http://www.whatismyip.org/[/url].

    Once you know the address, you can check by going to the address. Say WhatIsMyIP says it's 1.2.3.4, you'd open a browser and goto [url]http://1.2.3.4/index.htm[/url].

    Now, that address changes but you'd like to always be able to get to the server, you can try out various dynamic DNS services, they provide a client that you run on the server (your machine) that updates the DDNS servers as to what your current external address is, allowing you to have a nice name attached to your machine.

    This should be a good start, but be sure to read guides on securing your machine and patching utilities to make sure your server is secure from cracking attempts.
  2. Thanks for the reply. Although I had set up forwarding with the Virtual Server, I wasn't aware that my ISP would block port 80, 21... so I had to change the public ports on the server to 5080, 5021... and used DynDNS to hide the ip behind a name.

    Jo
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