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Wow, CRT RPTVs sure are lots cheaper than DLP or LCD!

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Anonymous
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November 20, 2004 12:27:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I keep thinking that soon I will try to fit my 30" CRT HDTV into my bedroom
and get a 55-60ish" TV for the living room.

Looking at sets in that size range, the good sets, not the brands I have
never heard of. It seems the CRT sets are the only ones I can really afford
(sub $2000). Can anybody give me advice on this, should I wait for a DLP
set to come down in price? Is it a bad move to buy a CRT based RPTV? As
you can tell, I need somebody knowledgeable to help me decide on what tech
to go with. Price is really important.

--Dan
Anonymous
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November 20, 2004 12:27:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

dg wrote:

> I keep thinking that soon I will try to fit my 30" CRT HDTV into my bedroom
> and get a 55-60ish" TV for the living room.
>
> Looking at sets in that size range, the good sets, not the brands I have
> never heard of. It seems the CRT sets are the only ones I can really afford
> (sub $2000). Can anybody give me advice on this, should I wait for a DLP
> set to come down in price? Is it a bad move to buy a CRT based RPTV? As
> you can tell, I need somebody knowledgeable to help me decide on what tech
> to go with. Price is really important.
>

CRT technology is mature. That means that the costs have been wrung out
of the manufacturing process. Direct LCD and Plasma both have
manufacturing yield problems. It's hard to make that large a piece of
glass with that much circuitry perfectly. LCD projectors and DLP have
better yields so they are somewhat cheaper to make, though still more
expensive than a CRT RPT.

CRT technology is capable of better images precisely because it is
analog. Newer DLP and LCD projectors are using analog signals to control
luma (brightness) so that detail in dark areas can be more accurately be
displayed. Most direct LCDs and plasmas use scalars to convert the HDTV
geometry to their computer geometry.

The downside to CRTs is that geometry and convergence will never be
perfect, though it can be very good. If you want an excellent display at
a price you can afford, go with CRT RPTV. In 8 to 12 years, when you
want to replace it, newer technologies may have matured, or died out.

Matthews

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
Anonymous
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November 20, 2004 2:15:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Lytnd.19883$zx1.14026@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>I keep thinking that soon I will try to fit my 30" CRT HDTV into my bedroom
> and get a 55-60ish" TV for the living room.
>
> Looking at sets in that size range, the good sets, not the brands I have
> never heard of. It seems the CRT sets are the only ones I can really
> afford
> (sub $2000). Can anybody give me advice on this, should I wait for a DLP
> set to come down in price? Is it a bad move to buy a CRT based RPTV? As
> you can tell, I need somebody knowledgeable to help me decide on what tech
> to go with. Price is really important.
>
> --Dan
I was in the same boat but I took a Hitachi 57xwx20b because I got it for
2000.00 from RexTv. This same set listed at over 4000.00 back in 2003 when
it came out. I checked and the best price online was 3400.00. I thought it
was great in 2003 and now I'm even happier.
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Anonymous
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November 20, 2004 2:15:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

And I've got a "little" Hitachi 46WS500 but also a somewhat "little" living
room; i.e. only about 8 ft. between me and the set. So 46" is just fine
thank you! BillR.
"Tgs1420" <tgs1420@xsbcglobal.net.> wrote in message
news:f8vnd.30318$Qv5.28591@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
>
> "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:Lytnd.19883$zx1.14026@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
> >I keep thinking that soon I will try to fit my 30" CRT HDTV into my
bedroom
> > and get a 55-60ish" TV for the living room.
> >
> > Looking at sets in that size range, the good sets, not the brands I have
> > never heard of. It seems the CRT sets are the only ones I can really
> > afford
> > (sub $2000). Can anybody give me advice on this, should I wait for a
DLP
> > set to come down in price? Is it a bad move to buy a CRT based RPTV?
As
> > you can tell, I need somebody knowledgeable to help me decide on what
tech
> > to go with. Price is really important.
> >
> > --Dan
> I was in the same boat but I took a Hitachi 57xwx20b because I got it for
> 2000.00 from RexTv. This same set listed at over 4000.00 back in 2003 when
> it came out. I checked and the best price online was 3400.00. I thought it
> was great in 2003 and now I'm even happier.
>
>
Anonymous
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November 20, 2004 10:26:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Matthew L. Martin wrote:
>
> The downside to CRTs is that geometry and convergence will never be
> perfect, though it can be very good.

The other downside is size and weight. If you're planning to dedicate a
big chunk of floorspace to your set, then CRT can be a reasonable
choice. But if you want to put a large screen on a shelf or on a wall,
the newer technologies have some real advantages.
Anonymous
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November 21, 2004 2:00:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 21:27:07 GMT, "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote:

>I keep thinking that soon I will try to fit my 30" CRT HDTV into my bedroom
>and get a 55-60ish" TV for the living room.
>
>Looking at sets in that size range, the good sets, not the brands I have
>never heard of. It seems the CRT sets are the only ones I can really afford
>(sub $2000). Can anybody give me advice on this, should I wait for a DLP
>set to come down in price? Is it a bad move to buy a CRT based RPTV? As
>you can tell, I need somebody knowledgeable to help me decide on what tech
>to go with. Price is really important.

I researched HDTV's for about a year. Lots of stuff on the
avs forum made me apprehensive about the new HDTV technologies;
i.e., DLP's, LCD's, plasmas.
Just happened through Best Buy's HDTV section and saw a GE (General
Electric) 52" CRT rear projection. The picture was as good as any
other in that area; subjectively maybe better. I believe I paid about
$897 and I've had it about a month. What a joy!
After it was delivered, I noticed it was built by Thompson (RCA),
so lots of folks believe that is a troublesome brand. I paid $250
for a 4 year warranty, so the salesman knocked off the $75 delivery
fee (I'm 40 miles from the store).
The screen has no glare,but it is a somewhat heavy dude. I'm
planning on keeping it for about 3 or 4 years (or 'till I die,
whatever comes 1st). By then, the other technologies will mature.
Incidentally, there isn't that much being transmitted in HDTV, but
when it is the picture is absolutely fantastic. Makes SD kinda tough
to watch. YMMV
Anonymous
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November 21, 2004 9:09:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 21-Nov-2004, E. E. Herbert <eherbt@excite.com> wrote:

> After it was delivered, I noticed it was built by Thompson (RCA),
> so lots of folks believe that is a troublesome brand.

Thomson owns both RCA and GE.

For several years now the only difference in many models they make is the
brand name but one may not notice that since they are usuallly not on
display side by sire.

--
John in Sun Prairie
Anonymous
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November 22, 2004 5:25:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dan,

IMHO buy a DLP if you want to pay a little more and a CRT if your money
is tight.

Pro and Cons...

CRTs/LCDs...subject to potential screen burn...will yellow with age.

LCDs/Plasmas...subject to frozen/dead pixels

LCDs/DLPs...lap will need replacement but returns television to new
condition

RPTV...Inceases burnin potential

Plasmas have a much shorter life span

DLPs may have a rainbow affect but this problem is reduced/elimnated on
newer dual-chip sets. DLP have "zero" screen burn-in potential. This is
comforting for gaming, home media services and internet viewing.

Harry
Admin at http://www.hdtvforum.com
Check out our daily news.
Anonymous
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November 23, 2004 4:41:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I had the same dilemma. Went to a Circuit City and observed the buying
patterns of the shoppers. They are paying a premium for the slim cabinets,
and I do not think that there will be a sudden drop in prices for the DLP or
LCD screens. The rear projectionCRT's are downright cheap by comparison,
and it looks like they will be delegated to the low end or dissapear
altogether so I went ahead and purchased a Mitsubishi rear projection while
some decent models are still available. Properly set up, I have no envy for
any of the newer technologies. Just my opinion.

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Lytnd.19883$zx1.14026@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
> I keep thinking that soon I will try to fit my 30" CRT HDTV into my
bedroom
> and get a 55-60ish" TV for the living room.
>
> Looking at sets in that size range, the good sets, not the brands I have
> never heard of. It seems the CRT sets are the only ones I can really
afford
> (sub $2000). Can anybody give me advice on this, should I wait for a DLP
> set to come down in price? Is it a bad move to buy a CRT based RPTV? As
> you can tell, I need somebody knowledgeable to help me decide on what tech
> to go with. Price is really important.
>
> --Dan
>
>
!