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Linux for a newbie, who is also a gamer

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January 11, 2007 4:58:23 PM

Hello.
I'm new here, just found the forum.
And I also have some questions. I just hope I'm asking in the right part of the forum. Excuse my bad english also, I'm from Brazil.

I use Windows XP SP2 and I don't really like it. I tried using linux, but it was kinda hard bc I'm a total noob at it. :( 
I would like to know if there is a way to play my games in a linux distro, and the p2p programs too, such as ARES.
I wanna start linux, but it's pretty hard to start without anyone to help.
Can anyone recommend me a distro, to start and everything? I hope I can find install drives also. I have a Pentium 4 2.4Ghz, with a geforce4 128.

My Msn messenger is vferrari5@hotmail.com if anyone could contact me to help.

Thanks a lot.

More about : linux newbie gamer

January 11, 2007 9:30:12 PM

Hello!
=]
Thanks a lot for the welcoming. :D 

I've talked to a friend today and he recommended me to take a linux course for a start...Hehe...Well...xD

Is Fedora free? I'm gonna go look for it, for sure.

One thing that really gets me thinking about linux...is...Can I use my iPod normally and manage the songs like I do with iTunes? Or will I need to have another partition with WinXP so I can manage my mp3 player?

I'm glad to hear about the drivers, bc the guy I know who uses Debian, said I'd have to compilate the video drivers and that it wasn't really easy...Kinda scared me...Hehe...

Thanks a lot for the reply again! :) 
a b 5 Linux
January 12, 2007 5:08:47 PM

Quote:
I've talked to a friend today and he recommended me to take a linux course for a start...Hehe...Well...xD


It would help if its an option open to you but is by no means essential. As with anything you can teach yourself if you like. I found a combination of reading and asking questions gave me a grounding. You will never 'know' Linux, there will always be something else that you can learn. Focus on a particular task that you want to do and work on that. As with Windows many of the skills you learn will be very easy to re-use on other problems further down the line.

Quote:
Is Fedora free? I'm gonna go look for it, for sure.


Yes Fedora is free. Most Linux versions are available for free. The versions that you buy may include additional commercial software or technical support. You dont need to pay for anything to get started and have a play.

Quote:
One thing that really gets me thinking about linux...is...Can I use my iPod normally and manage the songs like I do with iTunes? Or will I need to have another partition with WinXP so I can manage my mp3 player?


I'll give you the good news. Yes you can control your iPod from Linux. Certainly Amarok allows you to upload tunes and manage your collection and there are others. This is NOT iTunes though. In order to buy music via iTunes you would need to run something like Sharpmusic. There is no shame in leaving an XP install on the disc for a while until you learn how to do some of these things.

Quote:
I'm glad to hear about the drivers, bc the guy I know who uses Debian, said I'd have to compilate the video drivers and that it wasn't really easy...Kinda scared me...Hehe...


If you have a friend with Debian knowledge then it might make sense for you to use Kbuntu / Ubuntu (Ubuntu) as it is based on Debian and your friend might be able to help you with it more easily.

Dont worry about the graphics driver. You will need to install the NVida driver to get the best but this can now be done as an automated process if it scares you off.

Quote:
Thanks a lot for the reply again! :) 


Glad to see somebody new coming down here. People down here will help if they can.
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a b 5 Linux
January 13, 2007 4:00:12 AM

Great advice, nice to have new-ish people coming in and playing clean-up ;) 

Grad school would be great if it weren't for all the school :) 
a b 5 Linux
January 13, 2007 9:43:33 AM

Well somebody has to help these people with low post counts out :p 

And as for cleaning up... Just say it balances out the mess I make over in the 'other' place. :wink:
a b 5 Linux
January 16, 2007 7:38:21 PM

Great advice all around :-D

Geeky_Byzantine :trophy:

AudioVoodoo :trophy:

bmouring :trophy:

With modern desktop oriented distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora all you have to do is apt-get or yum whatever you need. You do not have to touch a compiler unless you really want to.

If you choose Ubuntu check out the ubuntu forums and resources at http://www.ubuntu.com/

If you choose Fedora head on over to http://fedora.redhat.com/ http://www.fedoraforum.org/ http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/ and be sure to check out the great extras livna.org provides http://rpm.livna.org/rlowiki/UsingLivna


But you know what I've been recommending both Ubuntu and Fedora lately ;-) it's twice the Linux goodness :-D

No harm in using both.

If you still need to use win32 programs check out WINE, Cedega, VMWare, QEMU, DOSBox, etc.

Naturally running native Linux programs and games is always better!

GL :-D
a b 5 Linux
January 16, 2007 8:11:37 PM

Quote:
But you know what I've been recommending both Ubuntu and Fedora lately ;-) it's twice the Linux goodness :-D


Is this some dubious attempt by Linus and the crew to double the installed user base overnight?
January 17, 2007 3:15:06 PM

Fedora Core 5 was my first then migrated to Ubuntu- Draper Drake, but I too am just a N00b when it comes to Linux but these guys here are more then friendly and will help you step by step making sure your experience with linux is at its best :wink:
January 19, 2007 1:31:41 AM

I'd have to agree with the recommendations so far on which distro to use. Ubuntu/Kubuntu is a great place to start, as it is very user friendly, help you get your feet wet. Once you get the hang of how linux works, there are tons of other distros as well.

Since linux is open source, there are tons of applications and programs that will do just about anything imaginable...for free. So there is a world outside of windows that is definately worth taking advantage of.

Now the bad news. First off there are almost no games compiled natively for linux. And programs like wine, cedega etc. will only play select windows game titles. Keep in mind they are emulator programs. And emulating a closed source OS like windows is not an easy task. Of my vast collection of games, only a select few work. And of the few that work, they do with minor annoyances. But to be honest thats the ONLY thing linux does worse than windows.

If you are a gamer then you will want to have a dual boot system set up with windows/linux. I always reccomend having a second hard drive for your linux install.

Good luck!! Linux is a great thing.
a b 5 Linux
January 19, 2007 3:59:36 AM

Quote:
...
But to be honest thats the ONLY thing linux does worse than windows
...


Don't forget crashing often. Windows has us licked there too.
a b 5 Linux
January 20, 2007 9:07:18 AM

And the taking money from our pockets task.. got us licked there too..
a b 5 Linux
January 22, 2007 6:24:35 PM

bmouring && AudioVoodoo indeed

and DRM too
a b 5 Linux
January 22, 2007 8:27:33 PM

I forgot to include irritating animated desktop assistants such as our friend 'Clippy'... We need to file some bug reports... :lol: 
January 23, 2007 3:15:37 PM

This is a good read as I'd like to become more experience with Linux. I'm a long-time PC user (started in the DOS days) and I've grown very 'comfortable' with the Windows environment. As a gamer, I'm very hesitant to leave Windows behind for that same reason that commanderspockep mentioned.

At one point I did install Mandrake Linux 9.0 (in a Multi-boot scenario). I got the setup working just fine. Booted into Linux (I think it used either the GNOME or KDE shell (and I'm probably spelling those wrong). I thought..."Hmmm...this is different." I played a couple of games of Tux Racer....and that's pretty much it.... I haven't touched Linux again.
January 23, 2007 3:42:57 PM

One other thing that I have noticed is that while a lot of games may not natively support Linux....a lot of 'multiplayer' style games have Dedicated Server files for BOTH Windows or Linux.... So while you may play the game in Windows, the server everyone is connected to is using Linux (and the dedicated Server files are natively Linux (I believe).
a b 5 Linux
January 23, 2007 4:32:19 PM

Some game "servers" are in fact Linux and tend to work quite well as long as they are written properly :-D

It is always best to run the native Linux version of a game if one is available.

If one is not available there is a chance WINE, Cedega or a similar program may support it.

Check out:

http://appdb.winehq.org/appbrowse.php?iCatId=2

http://transgaming.org/gamesdb/


Other options include:

http://www.vmware.com/

http://qemu.org/

DOSBox

Win4Lin

ReactOS

and many others including ones for consoles, etc

granted your mileage will vary, virtual machines and emulators are not always good for games

Dual booting is also an option for those stubborn games that simply will not run.

Either way Linux is great to have around even if it cannot run all your games. There are many other things it can do very well, without headaches.

If you want to give Linux another try I would suggest Fedora Core 6 or Ununtu 6.10 or BOTH :-D

http://lunapark6.com/?p=2454

http://www.ubuntu.com/

You can do fancy stuff now :-D




Quote:
One other thing that I have noticed is that while a lot of games may not natively support Linux....a lot of 'multiplayer' style games have Dedicated Server files for BOTH Windows or Linux.... So while you may play the game in Windows, the server everyone is connected to is using Linux (and the dedicated Server files are natively Linux (I believe).
January 23, 2007 8:28:12 PM

Excellent discussion, back in the PII days I dual-boot into Redhat but somehow life got in the way and I unfortunately left the Linux community. I'm so discussed with MS and DRM that I'm coming back to this gem. I have the full support of my wife to install Linux and thinking of going with ubuntu.

Thank you for the breath of fresh air.
a b 5 Linux
January 23, 2007 8:42:56 PM

I have a feeling a lot of this crippling in the name of content protection coupled with the notable advances in some of the historically weak areas of Linux (easy hardware support, easy software installation, more friendly apps) will definately boost free OS use in the foreseeable future.
January 23, 2007 9:43:52 PM

Yes, I remember the fun hassle to install Redhat... what I recall was command line with the xwindows if I'm not mistaken. It's amazing what has happen in the last 10 years with Linux. MS will be, if not already concerned with the ease in which noobs can install and enjoy Linux.
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