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disabling shared system memory

Last response: in Windows Vista
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January 11, 2007 5:27:30 PM

Hello,

As I was adjusting the advanced settings for my monitor I came across this.

Total Available Graphics Memory: 757MB
Dedicated Video Memory: 510MB
System Video Memory: 0MB
Shared System Memory: 246MB

My computer is using a Dedicated Video Card "Radeon X1600 Pro" with 512MB of memory. The system memory in my computer is only 1GB. So I was wondering if anyone knew how to disable this Shared System Memory as I do not want to dedicate 1/4 of my computers memory resources towards my video just in case the video cards 512MB is not enough to run the Windows Aero interface or some low end game I play.

I have been searching MS help, these forums and googling to no avail.

This seems absolutely ridiculous. The whole purpose of having a dedicated video card is so that you don't share your systems memory. I need that memory for running programs and looking at pr0n. I don't play intensive 3D shooters that may need that extra video memory, if I did I would run an SLI setup.
January 11, 2007 6:59:02 PM

The solution will not be in the OS. Try searching thru your BIOS.
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January 11, 2007 8:59:42 PM

I think Vista takes your Aperature size set in BIOS and reports it as shared video memory. Of course, if your onboard video is still enabled somehow, then that is your problem.
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Related resources
January 11, 2007 9:15:18 PM

Vista is using a different Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) than XP (and before) used.

Quote:
In WDDM, the operating system can accurately account for each of the graphics memory contributors and report available memory precisely through new APIs. The following are some of the clients that use this reporting:
·Windows System Assessment Tool (WinSAT) checks for the available graphics memory and takes the action to turn off or on the Premium Aero Glass experience based on the amount of available memory.
·The Desktop Windows Manager (dwm.exe) is depends on the exact state of the available graphics memory on WDDM systems.
·DirectX games and other graphics applications for Windows Vista need to be able to get accurate values describing the state of the graphics memory in the system. An inaccurate graphics memory number could drastically change the game experience for the user, for example.

Thus, Windows Vista enables the critically important capability of reporting the correct amount of graphics memory to the end-user.

http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/c/5/9c5b2167-8017-4bae-9fde-d599bac8184a/GraphicsMemory.doc

Vista is not dedicating the Shared memory to graphics. This memory can be used by programs if needed, but if the Shared memory is not enough additional to what Vista needs, it will start shutting down some graphic-intensive interface features - such as Aero.
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Anonymous
a b } Memory
December 24, 2009 4:03:10 AM

look up in this link posted by: exit2dos

http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/c/5/9c5b2167-8...

it has more in-dept details :bounce: 

in another word you can't do much about it, so learn to deal or with what you got to do is upgrade your card to a higher ram size , because this vista BS is just wack
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a b } Memory
December 24, 2009 4:28:32 AM

Quote:
look up in this link posted by: exit2dos

http://download.microsoft.com/download/9/c/5/9c5b2167-8...

it has more in-dept details :bounce: 

in another word you can't do much about it, so learn to deal or with what you got to do is upgrade your card to a higher ram size , because this vista BS is just wack


Speaking of wack BS, you replied to a three year old post from 2007. Read the date of the posts in the thread before posting on any forum.
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September 22, 2011 12:53:09 AM

I have to post again because this was the number 1 result for a search on this.

Aero does not need 768MB of memory. A 64MB video card will run it just fine.

One poster above talked about aperture size. This is important:

Disable your onboard video, and lower the aperture size in CMOS/BIOS settings to as low as possible. This disables the shared memory.
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a c 99 } Memory
September 22, 2011 12:58:52 AM

This topic has been closed by Area51reopened
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