Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Programs for Video Editing

Last response: in Apps General Discussion
Share
January 13, 2007 6:06:08 PM

What are some good programs for video editing? I would like to edit home movies, add pictures, add music or naration. How does the program capture the portion of film?

More about : programs video editing

January 13, 2007 10:40:52 PM

I just got Cyberlink Power Director 5 and really like it because it's easy to use some of the reviews say it's slow but I don't it's that bad. Adobe makes good software as well but not sure if it's as easy to use. The answer in part depends of your experience. If you are just starting out, I'd make ease of use a priority. Once you're ready for all the advance stuff you'll be ready to get a new program anyway. Found this site usefull.

http://video-editing-software-review.toptenreviews.com/
February 10, 2007 2:17:01 AM

Who are these guys (TopTenReviews...)? I looked around their site and it looks like they're shills. Many of the 'reviews' I looked at are mostly check box lists or rehashes of stuff from the company web sites. I even found them giving Top10 status to systems that they admit has not been released and they have not done any testing.

I don't think I would base a buy decision on anything these guys said.
Related resources
February 10, 2007 11:19:46 AM

Quote:
Who are these guys (TopTenReviews...)? I looked around their site and it looks like they're shills. Many of the 'reviews' I looked at are mostly check box lists or rehashes of stuff from the company web sites. I even found them giving Top10 status to systems that they admit has not been released and they have not done any testing.

I don't think I would base a buy decision on anything these guys said.


Can't really comment on their other reviews because I've never used them for anything other than video editing software and they're reviews are pretty much on the mark for this. Also, I said it was a good starting point, I wouldn't really on any one site for reviews for anything. Finally, all companies will let you download a trial version of their video editing software to try, which you should definitely do. It's best to only install one video editing program at a time given they generally to not play well together.
February 15, 2007 1:09:09 AM

I have used Pinnacle Studio versions 9 & 10, ULead Video Studio versions 6, 8 & 9 and Adobe Premiere Elements versions 2 & 3. Both versions of Pinnacle Studio crashed constantly and version 10 was very slow, even on my current build. Basically, even though I got both versions for free after rebate I think I may have paid too much. :)  (I still had to pay postage)

ULead was easy to use and I would have recommended it had I not tried Adobe Premiere Elements. Adobe is easy to use, has only crashed on me once (and I figured out I was working on a file that had issues, because it crashed anything else I tried to use to edit it) and is very quick to work with (as compared to the other video editing programs). So, I would highly recommend the Adobe program.

As to how the program captures the video, depends on your source. If you are using a DV or mini DV tape digital camcorder then the video program itself will capture it (in DVI format ... my understanding of the DVD or hard drive based camcorders is that it will import as an mpeg video, but I am unsure if a video editing program can import it or if you have to use a program from the camcorder manufacturer do so). If your source is analog, i.e. analog camcorder, VHS tape, etc., then you will use whatever video capture device you have in your computer (VIVO capable video card, TV Card such as an ATI TV Wonder, ect.) to capture the video and simply import the mpegs into the video editing software.
!