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A good article on VOOM

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Anonymous
November 23, 2004 9:45:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Voom Times
Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
By Fred Kaplan
Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT

When I bought a high-definition television in 2000, I felt a bit like my
childhood neighbor who bought a color TV in the early 1960s only to find
out that the only programs in color were Wonderful World of Disney and
Bonanza. Now, four years later, most cable companies offer at least a
handful of high-def channels. The two main satellite services, DISH
Network and DirecTV, have eight and seven, respectively, along with a
high-def pay-per-view channel.

Yet the 11.5 million Americans who own an HDTV are still waiting for the
revolution that inspired them to spend four figures on a television set
in the first place. That is, they're still waiting for the day when
there are so many high-def channels that there's always some high-def
program on worth watching.

That day has arrived in a carrier called VOOM, a Long Island-based
satellite service owned by Cablevision. VOOM offers 37 high-definition
channels four times as many as any other single satellite or cable
company. Its competitors both offer HBO, Showtime, ESPN, and Discovery
Theater in high-definition. VOOM has all of those, plus an additional
HBO HD channel, an additional Showtime HD channel, two Starz HD
channels, two Cinemax HD channels, and HD versions of The Movie Channel,
Bravo, and Encore. It also has 21 unique HD channels, including 10 movie
channels, two concert channels, and separate channels for news, world
sports, extreme sports, fashion, and classic cartoons.

Continue Article

When VOOM launched a year ago, most of these unique channels were pretty
dreadful. The movies in particular were awful. Now a lot of them are
really good. In the past month or so, they've included Blood Simple, Z,
Twentieth Century, Coup de Torchon, Barry Lyndon, A Hard Day's Night,
The Man Who Would Be King, A Clockwork Orange, For a Few Dollars More,
the original Manchurian Candidate, and a Woody Allen festival that
included Manhattan, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Bananas, and Radio Days.

If you've seen high-definition any company's high-definition you know
that it's a vast improvement over normal (what they now call "standard-
definition") television. First, most HD programs are broadcast in
widescreen, so if you have a widescreen television the image will fill
the screen rather than being framed by those black letterbox bars on the
top and bottom. Second, while a standard TV image is composed of 480
horizontal lines, an HDTV image has 1,080 lines. More lines mean a
denser, richer, more detailed, more lifelike picture. Third, many HD
shows are carried in Dolby Digital surround sound.

The thing about VOOM, though, is that its picture quality is superior in
some cases, vastly superior to any high-definition image I've seen on
other satellite or cable services. Images appear almost three-
dimensional. Colors are more saturated, though not in an exaggerated
way. Flesh tones are more nuanced. Blacks are blacker, and contrasts are
more subtle. An example: The first day I got VOOM, I watched Hero (the
Dustin Hoffman-Geena Davis film, not the Chinese swashbuckler) on
Showtime-HD. I'd seen the movie on the same channel, via DISH Network,
just a few weeks earlier. In the dark scenes that take place at a
nighttime plane crash, VOOM reveals much more detail: more expression on
people's faces, more gradations between dark and light, and more
delineation between objects and shadows. The effect isn't just some
videophile's delight; it makes the picture more vivid and the movie more
absorbing.

VOOM has a sharper picture because its transmissions are less
compressed. (All digital broadcast signals have to be somewhat
compressed; there's only so much bandwidth.) There is a downside to
this: The signal is less compressed because VOOM's satellites, unlike
those of DirecTV or DISH, do not carry channels for local stations.
VOOM's hardware package does include an antenna that can pick up digital
broadcasts. In most cities, and a growing number of smaller towns, the
network affiliates do transmit digital signals over the airwaves. But if
you live outside such areas and want to watch ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, the
WB, Fox, or UPN, then VOOM will not serve your needs. (Click here for a
list of towns that have over-the-air digital broadcasts.)

Other practical matters: VOOM has nearly every channel offered by the
other satellite services, with a few notable exceptions. In standard
definition, it's lacking the Food Channel, though it is scheduled to
pick it up soon; in high def, DISH and DirecTV carry Mark Cuban's HDNet
and HDNet Movies, which VOOM does not. VOOM's premium service, which
includes 120 channels, costs $89.90 a month, about the same as the other
satellite carriers. (A more basic option, which has only 50 channels and
doesn't include HBO, Showtime, and so forth, is $49.90 a month, but why
would you bother?) The hardware is cheaper than some others: $199 for
installation plus $9.50 per month if you rent; $499, installation
included, if you buy. I'd recommend renting for now. Company spokesmen
say that by March, VOOM will offer a new satellite receiver with a
built-in high-definition digital video recorder. They also promise that
by March they'll expand the lineup to 70 high-definition channels and
start showing HD versions of 190 films from Miramax and Dimension. Wait
to buy till then.

Another consideration: This is a small company. It has only 26,000
subscribers, as compared to DISH's 10.4 million and DirecTV's 11.6
million. (How many of those subscribers receive high-def services is
unknown the companies don't break out that data but the number is
probably a lot higher than 26,000.) VOOM also got off to a rocky start:
a faulty satellite receiver, poor installers, and worse customer
service. Those problems seem to be in the past, but some financial
analysts suspect that VOOM might not be around for long. Short of that,
it could get bought out by one of the giants, in which case its quality
might conceivably decline. If you have an HDTV, it's worth giving VOOM a
shot at least on a rental basis both for your own pleasure and to help
secure the future of high definition.

Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist, also writes about home
theater for The Perfect Vision and other publications.

More about : good article voom

Anonymous
November 23, 2004 9:45:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I've had Voom for 6 months or so and it has really become quite boring.
Same old cartoons, same old 60 year old rockers on Rave,
same old sci-fi/monsters stuff.



"LivingReminder" <Living@aol.com> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA81CA4684DLiving@24.93.43.121...
> Voom Times
> Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
> By Fred Kaplan
> Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
>
> When I bought a high-definition television in 2000, I felt a bit like my
> childhood neighbor who bought a color TV in the early 1960s only to find
> out that the only programs in color were Wonderful World of Disney and
> Bonanza. Now, four years later, most cable companies offer at least a
> handful of high-def channels. The two main satellite services, DISH
> Network and DirecTV, have eight and seven, respectively, along with a
> high-def pay-per-view channel.
>
> Yet the 11.5 million Americans who own an HDTV are still waiting for the
> revolution that inspired them to spend four figures on a television set
> in the first place. That is, they're still waiting for the day when
> there are so many high-def channels that there's always some high-def
> program on worth watching.
>
> That day has arrived in a carrier called VOOM, a Long Island-based
> satellite service owned by Cablevision. VOOM offers 37 high-definition
> channels four times as many as any other single satellite or cable
> company. Its competitors both offer HBO, Showtime, ESPN, and Discovery
> Theater in high-definition. VOOM has all of those, plus an additional
> HBO HD channel, an additional Showtime HD channel, two Starz HD
> channels, two Cinemax HD channels, and HD versions of The Movie Channel,
> Bravo, and Encore. It also has 21 unique HD channels, including 10 movie
> channels, two concert channels, and separate channels for news, world
> sports, extreme sports, fashion, and classic cartoons.
>
> Continue Article
>
> When VOOM launched a year ago, most of these unique channels were pretty
> dreadful. The movies in particular were awful. Now a lot of them are
> really good. In the past month or so, they've included Blood Simple, Z,
> Twentieth Century, Coup de Torchon, Barry Lyndon, A Hard Day's Night,
> The Man Who Would Be King, A Clockwork Orange, For a Few Dollars More,
> the original Manchurian Candidate, and a Woody Allen festival that
> included Manhattan, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Bananas, and Radio Days.
>
> If you've seen high-definition any company's high-definition you know
> that it's a vast improvement over normal (what they now call "standard-
> definition") television. First, most HD programs are broadcast in
> widescreen, so if you have a widescreen television the image will fill
> the screen rather than being framed by those black letterbox bars on the
> top and bottom. Second, while a standard TV image is composed of 480
> horizontal lines, an HDTV image has 1,080 lines. More lines mean a
> denser, richer, more detailed, more lifelike picture. Third, many HD
> shows are carried in Dolby Digital surround sound.
>
> The thing about VOOM, though, is that its picture quality is superior in
> some cases, vastly superior to any high-definition image I've seen on
> other satellite or cable services. Images appear almost three-
> dimensional. Colors are more saturated, though not in an exaggerated
> way. Flesh tones are more nuanced. Blacks are blacker, and contrasts are
> more subtle. An example: The first day I got VOOM, I watched Hero (the
> Dustin Hoffman-Geena Davis film, not the Chinese swashbuckler) on
> Showtime-HD. I'd seen the movie on the same channel, via DISH Network,
> just a few weeks earlier. In the dark scenes that take place at a
> nighttime plane crash, VOOM reveals much more detail: more expression on
> people's faces, more gradations between dark and light, and more
> delineation between objects and shadows. The effect isn't just some
> videophile's delight; it makes the picture more vivid and the movie more
> absorbing.
>
> VOOM has a sharper picture because its transmissions are less
> compressed. (All digital broadcast signals have to be somewhat
> compressed; there's only so much bandwidth.) There is a downside to
> this: The signal is less compressed because VOOM's satellites, unlike
> those of DirecTV or DISH, do not carry channels for local stations.
> VOOM's hardware package does include an antenna that can pick up digital
> broadcasts. In most cities, and a growing number of smaller towns, the
> network affiliates do transmit digital signals over the airwaves. But if
> you live outside such areas and want to watch ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, the
> WB, Fox, or UPN, then VOOM will not serve your needs. (Click here for a
> list of towns that have over-the-air digital broadcasts.)
>
> Other practical matters: VOOM has nearly every channel offered by the
> other satellite services, with a few notable exceptions. In standard
> definition, it's lacking the Food Channel, though it is scheduled to
> pick it up soon; in high def, DISH and DirecTV carry Mark Cuban's HDNet
> and HDNet Movies, which VOOM does not. VOOM's premium service, which
> includes 120 channels, costs $89.90 a month, about the same as the other
> satellite carriers. (A more basic option, which has only 50 channels and
> doesn't include HBO, Showtime, and so forth, is $49.90 a month, but why
> would you bother?) The hardware is cheaper than some others: $199 for
> installation plus $9.50 per month if you rent; $499, installation
> included, if you buy. I'd recommend renting for now. Company spokesmen
> say that by March, VOOM will offer a new satellite receiver with a
> built-in high-definition digital video recorder. They also promise that
> by March they'll expand the lineup to 70 high-definition channels and
> start showing HD versions of 190 films from Miramax and Dimension. Wait
> to buy till then.
>
> Another consideration: This is a small company. It has only 26,000
> subscribers, as compared to DISH's 10.4 million and DirecTV's 11.6
> million. (How many of those subscribers receive high-def services is
> unknown the companies don't break out that data but the number is
> probably a lot higher than 26,000.) VOOM also got off to a rocky start:
> a faulty satellite receiver, poor installers, and worse customer
> service. Those problems seem to be in the past, but some financial
> analysts suspect that VOOM might not be around for long. Short of that,
> it could get bought out by one of the giants, in which case its quality
> might conceivably decline. If you have an HDTV, it's worth giving VOOM a
> shot at least on a rental basis both for your own pleasure and to help
> secure the future of high definition.
>
> Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist, also writes about home
> theater for The Perfect Vision and other publications.
November 23, 2004 9:45:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>Voom Times
>Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
>By Fred Kaplan
>Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
<snip>
----------
I wish Voom would launch a bird so that decent reception is possible
in the NorthWest (Seattle). I'd subscribe in a minute if that
happened.
Related resources
Anonymous
November 23, 2004 11:44:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <N7idnWLHZfZvXj7cRVn-jg@mpowercom.net> "Henry Cabot Henhouse
III" <sooper_chicken@hotmail.com> writes:

>I've had Voom for 6 months or so and it has really become quite boring.
>Same old cartoons, same old 60 year old rockers on Rave,
>same old sci-fi/monsters stuff.

Whatchu dooin' in this noozegroup Mr Sooper Chicken?

>> Yet the 11.5 million Americans who own an HDTV are still waiting for the
>> revolution that inspired them to spend four figures on a television set
>> in the first place. That is, they're still waiting for the day when
>> there are so many high-def channels that there's always some high-def
>> program on worth watching.

Hellz Bellz, we're still waiting for the day when there's always something
on worth watching, never mind whether it's in HD or not. 225 channels of
satellite TV and we're still watching The Weather Channel.

Mitel Lurker...
November 23, 2004 11:55:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 18:45:24 GMT, LivingReminder <Living@aol.com>
wrote:

>Voom Times
>Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
>By Fred Kaplan
>Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
>
>When I bought a high-definition television in 2000, I felt a bit like my
>childhood neighbor who bought a color TV in the early 1960s only to find
>out that the only programs in color were Wonderful World of Disney and
>Bonanza. Now, four years later, most cable companies offer at least a
>handful of high-def channels. The two main satellite services, DISH
>Network and DirecTV, have eight and seven, respectively, along with a
>high-def pay-per-view channel.
>
>Yet the 11.5 million Americans who own an HDTV are still waiting for the
>revolution that inspired them to spend four figures on a television set
>in the first place. That is, they're still waiting for the day when
>there are so many high-def channels that there's always some high-def
>program on worth watching.
>
>That day has arrived in a carrier called VOOM, a Long Island-based
>satellite service owned by Cablevision. VOOM offers 37 high-definition
>channels four times as many as any other single satellite or cable
>company. Its competitors both offer HBO, Showtime, ESPN, and Discovery
>Theater in high-definition. VOOM has all of those, plus an additional
>HBO HD channel, an additional Showtime HD channel, two Starz HD
>channels, two Cinemax HD channels, and HD versions of The Movie Channel,
>Bravo, and Encore. It also has 21 unique HD channels, including 10 movie
>channels, two concert channels, and separate channels for news, world
>sports, extreme sports, fashion, and classic cartoons.
>
>Continue Article
>
>When VOOM launched a year ago, most of these unique channels were pretty
>dreadful. The movies in particular were awful. Now a lot of them are
>really good. In the past month or so, they've included Blood Simple, Z,
>Twentieth Century, Coup de Torchon, Barry Lyndon, A Hard Day's Night,
>The Man Who Would Be King, A Clockwork Orange, For a Few Dollars More,
>the original Manchurian Candidate, and a Woody Allen festival that
>included Manhattan, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Bananas, and Radio Days.
>
>If you've seen high-definition any company's high-definition you know
>that it's a vast improvement over normal (what they now call "standard-
>definition") television. First, most HD programs are broadcast in
>widescreen, so if you have a widescreen television the image will fill
>the screen rather than being framed by those black letterbox bars on the
>top and bottom. Second, while a standard TV image is composed of 480
>horizontal lines, an HDTV image has 1,080 lines. More lines mean a
>denser, richer, more detailed, more lifelike picture. Third, many HD
>shows are carried in Dolby Digital surround sound.
>
>The thing about VOOM, though, is that its picture quality is superior in
>some cases, vastly superior to any high-definition image I've seen on
>other satellite or cable services. Images appear almost three-
>dimensional. Colors are more saturated, though not in an exaggerated
>way. Flesh tones are more nuanced. Blacks are blacker, and contrasts are
>more subtle. An example: The first day I got VOOM, I watched Hero (the
>Dustin Hoffman-Geena Davis film, not the Chinese swashbuckler) on
>Showtime-HD. I'd seen the movie on the same channel, via DISH Network,
>just a few weeks earlier. In the dark scenes that take place at a
>nighttime plane crash, VOOM reveals much more detail: more expression on
>people's faces, more gradations between dark and light, and more
>delineation between objects and shadows. The effect isn't just some
>videophile's delight; it makes the picture more vivid and the movie more
>absorbing.
>
>VOOM has a sharper picture because its transmissions are less
>compressed. (All digital broadcast signals have to be somewhat
>compressed; there's only so much bandwidth.) There is a downside to
>this: The signal is less compressed because VOOM's satellites, unlike
>those of DirecTV or DISH, do not carry channels for local stations.
>VOOM's hardware package does include an antenna that can pick up digital
>broadcasts. In most cities, and a growing number of smaller towns, the
>network affiliates do transmit digital signals over the airwaves. But if
>you live outside such areas and want to watch ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, the
>WB, Fox, or UPN, then VOOM will not serve your needs. (Click here for a
>list of towns that have over-the-air digital broadcasts.)
>
>Other practical matters: VOOM has nearly every channel offered by the
>other satellite services, with a few notable exceptions. In standard
>definition, it's lacking the Food Channel, though it is scheduled to
>pick it up soon; in high def, DISH and DirecTV carry Mark Cuban's HDNet
>and HDNet Movies, which VOOM does not. VOOM's premium service, which
>includes 120 channels, costs $89.90 a month, about the same as the other
>satellite carriers. (A more basic option, which has only 50 channels and
>doesn't include HBO, Showtime, and so forth, is $49.90 a month, but why
>would you bother?) The hardware is cheaper than some others: $199 for
>installation plus $9.50 per month if you rent; $499, installation
>included, if you buy. I'd recommend renting for now. Company spokesmen
>say that by March, VOOM will offer a new satellite receiver with a
>built-in high-definition digital video recorder. They also promise that
>by March they'll expand the lineup to 70 high-definition channels and
>start showing HD versions of 190 films from Miramax and Dimension. Wait
>to buy till then.
>
>Another consideration: This is a small company. It has only 26,000
>subscribers, as compared to DISH's 10.4 million and DirecTV's 11.6
>million. (How many of those subscribers receive high-def services is
>unknown the companies don't break out that data but the number is
>probably a lot higher than 26,000.) VOOM also got off to a rocky start:
>a faulty satellite receiver, poor installers, and worse customer
>service. Those problems seem to be in the past, but some financial
>analysts suspect that VOOM might not be around for long. Short of that,
>it could get bought out by one of the giants, in which case its quality
>might conceivably decline. If you have an HDTV, it's worth giving VOOM a
>shot at least on a rental basis both for your own pleasure and to help
>secure the future of high definition.
>
>Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist, also writes about home
>theater for The Perfect Vision and other publications.

Looks like he's in the advertising business now.
thumper
To reply drop XYZ in address
November 24, 2004 3:08:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Abe <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in news:41h7q0l7tp8bo3eamfeusf6uel7lnhmut8
@4ax.com:

>
>>Voom Times
>>Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
>>By Fred Kaplan
>>Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
> <snip>
> ----------
> I wish Voom would launch a bird so that decent reception is possible
> in the NorthWest (Seattle). I'd subscribe in a minute if that
> happened.
>

How VOOM works
From Earth to space and back again, VOOM is built to deliver a superior
viewing experience. It's all thanks to a system of advanced technology
that no other provider can offer.

The Satellite
At the heart of the VOOM process is the Rainbow-1 DBS satellite.
This state-of-the-art powerhouse, built by Lockheed Martin, is the most
powerful dedicated direct-to-home satellite in the industry. As a
result, it delivers more reliable service and a data throughput 50% more
efficient than our competitors. Our satellite also supports the most
advanced delivery methods, now and in the future, to make the best use
of the VOOM signal. Your satellite dish is your personal connection to
the process, bringing the signal into your home.

http://www.voom.com/see_it/how.jsp
November 24, 2004 3:08:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>How VOOM works
>From Earth to space and back again, VOOM is built to deliver a superior
>viewing experience. It's all thanks to a system of advanced technology
>that no other provider can offer.
>
>The Satellite
> At the heart of the VOOM process is the Rainbow-1 DBS satellite.
>This state-of-the-art powerhouse, built by Lockheed Martin, is the most
>powerful dedicated direct-to-home satellite in the industry. As a
>result, it delivers more reliable service and a data throughput 50% more
>efficient than our competitors. Our satellite also supports the most
>advanced delivery methods, now and in the future, to make the best use
>of the VOOM signal. Your satellite dish is your personal connection to
>the process, bringing the signal into your home.
>
>http://www.voom.com/see_it/how.jsp
------------------------
That doesn't address the issue of the bird being at horizon level from
Seattle. Aiming a dish that low isn't possible for most people -
certainly not me.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 3:10:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Abe <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in news:41h7q0l7tp8bo3eamfeusf6uel7lnhmut8@
4ax.com:

>
>>Voom Times
>>Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
>>By Fred Kaplan
>>Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
> <snip>
> ----------
> I wish Voom would launch a bird so that decent reception is possible
> in the NorthWest (Seattle). I'd subscribe in a minute if that
> happened.

Since you're in Seattle, have you noticed that KING is often sending a
5.1 signal with only two channels active? I can work around it by
putting my box's output to PCM and telling the receiver to do Dolby
ProLogic II with the signal, but it's annoying to have to switch and then
switch back for other programming. You'd think if they wanted to send a
5.1 signal from a ProLogic-encoded source, they'd decode it first!

(I get it via Star Choice, but it's clearly a KING problem because they
switch to ProLogic in the commercials).

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
November 24, 2004 3:10:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>Since you're in Seattle, have you noticed that KING is often sending a
>5.1 signal with only two channels active? I can work around it by
>putting my box's output to PCM and telling the receiver to do Dolby
>ProLogic II with the signal, but it's annoying to have to switch and then
>switch back for other programming. You'd think if they wanted to send a
>5.1 signal from a ProLogic-encoded source, they'd decode it first!
>
>(I get it via Star Choice, but it's clearly a KING problem because they
>switch to ProLogic in the commercials).
--------------------
Yep. You hit the nail on the head. I wish they would make it easy to
get through to an engineer to report the issue. I've given up.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 12:42:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

LOL
You could put it on a 400 foot pole. ;-)


>That doesn't address the issue of the bird being at horizon level from
>Seattle. Aiming a dish that low isn't possible for most people -
>certainly not me.
>
>

--
Ric Seyler
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 1:46:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I'm in Los Angeles and while 61.5 sits pretty low, we can still see it...
Well, not see it, but ya know, aim a dish at it and pick it up.
Well, not pick it up, that would imply it's a hooker.





"Abe" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:0ob8q09b8ohm62djhtbp2fiutrhdb3li81@4ax.com...
>
> >How VOOM works
> >From Earth to space and back again, VOOM is built to deliver a superior
> >viewing experience. It's all thanks to a system of advanced technology
> >that no other provider can offer.
> >
> >The Satellite
> > At the heart of the VOOM process is the Rainbow-1 DBS satellite.
> >This state-of-the-art powerhouse, built by Lockheed Martin, is the most
> >powerful dedicated direct-to-home satellite in the industry. As a
> >result, it delivers more reliable service and a data throughput 50% more
> >efficient than our competitors. Our satellite also supports the most
> >advanced delivery methods, now and in the future, to make the best use
> >of the VOOM signal. Your satellite dish is your personal connection to
> >the process, bringing the signal into your home.
> >
> >http://www.voom.com/see_it/how.jsp
> ------------------------
> That doesn't address the issue of the bird being at horizon level from
> Seattle. Aiming a dish that low isn't possible for most people -
> certainly not me.
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 5:16:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Henry Cabot Henhouse III wrote:

> I'm in Los Angeles and while 61.5 sits pretty low, we can still see it...
> Well, not see it, but ya know, aim a dish at it and pick it up.
> Well, not pick it up, that would imply it's a hooker.
>


Well, it is a fee for service business, too.

Matthew
November 24, 2004 11:29:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

As of Oct 1, Voom had lost $400 MILLION, and in the quarter ending Sept30,
had added....(now wait for it) 1000 subscribers in 3 months!!! 1000 in 3
months? How pitiful is that?!
They are about to join Unity Motion, the Beta vcr and the Plymouth
automobile.

"LivingReminder" <Living@aol.com> wrote in message
news:Xns95AA81CA4684DLiving@24.93.43.121...
> Voom Times
> Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
> By Fred Kaplan
> Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
>
> When I bought a high-definition television in 2000, I felt a bit like my
> childhood neighbor who bought a color TV in the early 1960s only to find
> out that the only programs in color were Wonderful World of Disney and
> Bonanza. Now, four years later, most cable companies offer at least a
> handful of high-def channels. The two main satellite services, DISH
> Network and DirecTV, have eight and seven, respectively, along with a
> high-def pay-per-view channel.
>
> Yet the 11.5 million Americans who own an HDTV are still waiting for the
> revolution that inspired them to spend four figures on a television set
> in the first place. That is, they're still waiting for the day when
> there are so many high-def channels that there's always some high-def
> program on worth watching.
>
> That day has arrived in a carrier called VOOM, a Long Island-based
> satellite service owned by Cablevision. VOOM offers 37 high-definition
> channels four times as many as any other single satellite or cable
> company. Its competitors both offer HBO, Showtime, ESPN, and Discovery
> Theater in high-definition. VOOM has all of those, plus an additional
> HBO HD channel, an additional Showtime HD channel, two Starz HD
> channels, two Cinemax HD channels, and HD versions of The Movie Channel,
> Bravo, and Encore. It also has 21 unique HD channels, including 10 movie
> channels, two concert channels, and separate channels for news, world
> sports, extreme sports, fashion, and classic cartoons.
>
> Continue Article
>
> When VOOM launched a year ago, most of these unique channels were pretty
> dreadful. The movies in particular were awful. Now a lot of them are
> really good. In the past month or so, they've included Blood Simple, Z,
> Twentieth Century, Coup de Torchon, Barry Lyndon, A Hard Day's Night,
> The Man Who Would Be King, A Clockwork Orange, For a Few Dollars More,
> the original Manchurian Candidate, and a Woody Allen festival that
> included Manhattan, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Bananas, and Radio Days.
>
> If you've seen high-definition any company's high-definition you know
> that it's a vast improvement over normal (what they now call "standard-
> definition") television. First, most HD programs are broadcast in
> widescreen, so if you have a widescreen television the image will fill
> the screen rather than being framed by those black letterbox bars on the
> top and bottom. Second, while a standard TV image is composed of 480
> horizontal lines, an HDTV image has 1,080 lines. More lines mean a
> denser, richer, more detailed, more lifelike picture. Third, many HD
> shows are carried in Dolby Digital surround sound.
>
> The thing about VOOM, though, is that its picture quality is superior in
> some cases, vastly superior to any high-definition image I've seen on
> other satellite or cable services. Images appear almost three-
> dimensional. Colors are more saturated, though not in an exaggerated
> way. Flesh tones are more nuanced. Blacks are blacker, and contrasts are
> more subtle. An example: The first day I got VOOM, I watched Hero (the
> Dustin Hoffman-Geena Davis film, not the Chinese swashbuckler) on
> Showtime-HD. I'd seen the movie on the same channel, via DISH Network,
> just a few weeks earlier. In the dark scenes that take place at a
> nighttime plane crash, VOOM reveals much more detail: more expression on
> people's faces, more gradations between dark and light, and more
> delineation between objects and shadows. The effect isn't just some
> videophile's delight; it makes the picture more vivid and the movie more
> absorbing.
>
> VOOM has a sharper picture because its transmissions are less
> compressed. (All digital broadcast signals have to be somewhat
> compressed; there's only so much bandwidth.) There is a downside to
> this: The signal is less compressed because VOOM's satellites, unlike
> those of DirecTV or DISH, do not carry channels for local stations.
> VOOM's hardware package does include an antenna that can pick up digital
> broadcasts. In most cities, and a growing number of smaller towns, the
> network affiliates do transmit digital signals over the airwaves. But if
> you live outside such areas and want to watch ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, the
> WB, Fox, or UPN, then VOOM will not serve your needs. (Click here for a
> list of towns that have over-the-air digital broadcasts.)
>
> Other practical matters: VOOM has nearly every channel offered by the
> other satellite services, with a few notable exceptions. In standard
> definition, it's lacking the Food Channel, though it is scheduled to
> pick it up soon; in high def, DISH and DirecTV carry Mark Cuban's HDNet
> and HDNet Movies, which VOOM does not. VOOM's premium service, which
> includes 120 channels, costs $89.90 a month, about the same as the other
> satellite carriers. (A more basic option, which has only 50 channels and
> doesn't include HBO, Showtime, and so forth, is $49.90 a month, but why
> would you bother?) The hardware is cheaper than some others: $199 for
> installation plus $9.50 per month if you rent; $499, installation
> included, if you buy. I'd recommend renting for now. Company spokesmen
> say that by March, VOOM will offer a new satellite receiver with a
> built-in high-definition digital video recorder. They also promise that
> by March they'll expand the lineup to 70 high-definition channels and
> start showing HD versions of 190 films from Miramax and Dimension. Wait
> to buy till then.
>
> Another consideration: This is a small company. It has only 26,000
> subscribers, as compared to DISH's 10.4 million and DirecTV's 11.6
> million. (How many of those subscribers receive high-def services is
> unknown the companies don't break out that data but the number is
> probably a lot higher than 26,000.) VOOM also got off to a rocky start:
> a faulty satellite receiver, poor installers, and worse customer
> service. Those problems seem to be in the past, but some financial
> analysts suspect that VOOM might not be around for long. Short of that,
> it could get bought out by one of the giants, in which case its quality
> might conceivably decline. If you have an HDTV, it's worth giving VOOM a
> shot at least on a rental basis both for your own pleasure and to help
> secure the future of high definition.
>
> Fred Kaplan, Slate's "War Stories" columnist, also writes about home
> theater for The Perfect Vision and other publications.
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 1:46:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Abe <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in
news:2vb8q0l64g7ugtusrm37e4j25pp07uomv1@4ax.com:

>>Since you're in Seattle, have you noticed that KING is often sending a
>>5.1 signal with only two channels active? I can work around it by
>>putting my box's output to PCM and telling the receiver to do Dolby
>>ProLogic II with the signal, but it's annoying to have to switch and
>>then switch back for other programming. You'd think if they wanted to
>>send a 5.1 signal from a ProLogic-encoded source, they'd decode it
>>first!
>>
>>(I get it via Star Choice, but it's clearly a KING problem because
>>they switch to ProLogic in the commercials).
> --------------------
> Yep. You hit the nail on the head. I wish they would make it easy to
> get through to an engineer to report the issue. I've given up.

I did call their newsroom one night when they left the picture in SD
after a commercial and they did fix it. But it's long distance for me to
call them.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
Anonymous
November 25, 2004 10:09:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
northwest.

"Abe" <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:41h7q0l7tp8bo3eamfeusf6uel7lnhmut8@4ax.com...
>
>>Voom Times
>>Finally, some HDTV that's worth watching.
>>By Fred Kaplan
>>Posted Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004, at 9:55 AM PT
> <snip>
> ----------
> I wish Voom would launch a bird so that decent reception is possible
> in the NorthWest (Seattle). I'd subscribe in a minute if that
> happened.
>
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 1:40:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>northwest.

does he have a tunnel to aim the antenna through?
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 2:33:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>northwest.

What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
November 26, 2004 5:21:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>northwest.
>
>does he have a tunnel to aim the antenna through?
--------------
Exactly. He must have a clear path to the horizon. Most people don't.
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:32:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles Tomaras wrote:

> "rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
> news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>
>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>northwest.
>
>
> What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
>

How many people do you expect to get the references?

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:32:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
news:10qefk4j9k148c8@corp.supernews.com...
> Charles Tomaras wrote:
>
>> "rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>>
>>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>>northwest.
>>
>>
>> What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
>
> How many people do you expect to get the references?

I was responding to the poster.
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 12:32:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
news:10qefk4j9k148c8@corp.supernews.com...
> Charles Tomaras wrote:
>
>> "rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>>
>>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>>northwest.
>>
>>
>> What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
>
> How many people do you expect to get the references?


I will add, that for those interested in geography....Neah Bay/Cape Flattery
is at the absolute Northwest tip or corner of the lower 48 United States. It
is home to the Makah Indian Nation also housing a former US Military base
that is now the tribal headquarters for the Makah.

http://mappoint.msn.com/(rixyap45cvcadsjue1fg1rnu)/map.aspx?L=USA&C=48.36761%2c-124.62744&A=41.56667&P=|15CEA8|&TI=Neah+Bay%2c+Washington%2c+United+States
Anonymous
November 26, 2004 1:38:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Abe <noone@nowhere.com> wrote in message news:iq0eq09cna0jnt5a8eujlpi9vlut4pt4e1@4ax.com...
> >>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
> >>northwest.
> >
> >does he have a tunnel to aim the antenna through?
> --------------
> Exactly. He must have a clear path to the horizon. Most people don't.
>

I'm not saying that it isn't possible to have Voom in Sequim,
but I would never have expected it to be possible.

Sequim is on the north side of the Olympic Mountain range.
In most of that area, the southern horizon is about 5000 feet up.
November 27, 2004 12:21:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

You must be the Tomaras that taught in the South Kitsap school
district?

On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 09:25:49 -0800, "Charles Tomaras"
<tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote:

>
>"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
>news:10qefk4j9k148c8@corp.supernews.com...
>> Charles Tomaras wrote:
>>
>>> "rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
>>> news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>>>
>>>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>>>northwest.
>>>
>>>
>>> What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
>>
>> How many people do you expect to get the references?
>
>
>I will add, that for those interested in geography....Neah Bay/Cape Flattery
>is at the absolute Northwest tip or corner of the lower 48 United States. It
>is home to the Makah Indian Nation also housing a former US Military base
>that is now the tribal headquarters for the Makah.
>
>http://mappoint.msn.com/(rixyap45cvcadsjue1fg1rnu)/map.aspx?L=USA&C=48.36761%2c-124.62744&A=41.56667&P=|15CEA8|&TI=Neah+Bay%2c+Washington%2c+United+States
>
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 12:35:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Dave" <Dave@not.com> wrote in message
news:uqdhq0l0a931a682a3hbnm6pdv0ujcqtuk@4ax.com...
> You must be the Tomaras that taught in the South Kitsap school
> district?

Nope, no relation at all but I have seen thier name over the years as it's
not a very prevalent last name in Washington State.
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 9:38:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles Tomaras wrote:

> "Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
> news:10qefk4j9k148c8@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Charles Tomaras wrote:
>>
>>
>>>"rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
>>>news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>>>northwest.
>>>
>>>
>>>What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
>>
>>How many people do you expect to get the references?
>
>
>
> I will add, that for those interested in geography....Neah Bay/Cape Flattery
> is at the absolute Northwest tip or corner of the lower 48 United States. It
> is home to the Makah Indian Nation also housing a former US Military base
> that is now the tribal headquarters for the Makah.
>
> http://mappoint.msn.com/(rixyap45cvcadsjue1fg1rnu)/map.aspx?L=USA&C=48.36761%2c-124.62744&A=41.56667&P=|15CEA8|&TI=Neah+Bay%2c+Washington%2c+United+States
>
>

I guess you didn't get the reference, either. Ma and Pa Kettle made
their home in Cape Flattery. You can lok it up.

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
Anonymous
November 27, 2004 11:09:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
news:10qi3v2inbg7612@corp.supernews.com...
> Charles Tomaras wrote:
>
>> "Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
>> news:10qefk4j9k148c8@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>Charles Tomaras wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>"rz" <rz@inv.invalid> wrote in message
>>>>news:10qd7j0j6bh5ha1@news.supernews.com...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I have friend that has Voom in Sequim, WA. Can't get much further
>>>>>northwest.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>What about Neah Bay or Cape Flattery? :) 
>>>
>>>How many people do you expect to get the references?
>>
>>
>>
>> I will add, that for those interested in geography....Neah Bay/Cape
>> Flattery is at the absolute Northwest tip or corner of the lower 48
>> United States. It is home to the Makah Indian Nation also housing a
>> former US Military base that is now the tribal headquarters for the
>> Makah.
>>
>> http://mappoint.msn.com/(rixyap45cvcadsjue1fg1rnu)/map.aspx?L=USA&C=48.36761%2c-124.62744&A=41.56667&P=|15CEA8|&TI=Neah+Bay%2c+Washington%2c+United+States
>>
>>
>
> I guess you didn't get the reference, either. Ma and Pa Kettle made their
> home in Cape Flattery. You can lok it up.
>

I looked it up and you are correct. I have to admit I've never seen and know
little about Ma and Pa Kettle. Cape Flattery is an awfully remote place!
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 11:20:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles Tomaras wrote:

> "Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
> news:10qi3v2inbg7612@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>
>>I guess you didn't get the reference, either. Ma and Pa Kettle made their
>>home in Cape Flattery. You can lok it up.
>>
>
>
> I looked it up and you are correct. I have to admit I've never seen and know
> little about Ma and Pa Kettle. Cape Flattery is an awfully remote place!
>

Ma and Pa Kettle were supporting characters in "The Egg and I". They
stole the show as comic relief for the melodramatic major plot. They
went on to have a long series of movies that were very successful. The
even travled to Hawaii, which was pretty remote itself at the time.

All of the Kettle movies are out on DVD. Rent "The Egg and I" for a look
at the Kettles. You might like them

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 6:01:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:44:24 -0600, MrFixit@msn.com (Mr Fixit) wrote:

>In article <N7idnWLHZfZvXj7cRVn-jg@mpowercom.net> "Henry Cabot Henhouse
>III" <sooper_chicken@hotmail.com> writes:
>
>>I've had Voom for 6 months or so and it has really become quite boring.
>>Same old cartoons, same old 60 year old rockers on Rave,
>>same old sci-fi/monsters stuff.
>
>Whatchu dooin' in this noozegroup Mr Sooper Chicken?
>
>>> Yet the 11.5 million Americans who own an HDTV are still waiting for the
>>> revolution that inspired them to spend four figures on a television set
>>> in the first place. That is, they're still waiting for the day when
>>> there are so many high-def channels that there's always some high-def
>>> program on worth watching.
>
>Hellz Bellz, we're still waiting for the day when there's always something
>on worth watching, never mind whether it's in HD or not. 225 channels of
>satellite TV and we're still watching The Weather Channel.
>
>Mitel Lurker...

When you get a DVR, there is ALWAYS something worth watching. And no
commercials... I could never go back to watching TV live.
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 6:01:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<mortguffman@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:2honq05n9h6brf0q5rr63e0a3beog7mjq5@4ax.com...
>
> When you get a DVR, there is ALWAYS something worth watching. And no
> commercials... I could never go back to watching TV live.


Gotta agree with Mort...now that I have the Direct TV HD Tivo and I live in
a market (seattle) with great OTA HD coverage I always seem to find more to
record than I have the time to watch.
!