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HDTV Eye Doctor????

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November 24, 2004 3:17:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I love my crt hdtv altho I have tuned down the contrast it seems to cause
my eye to strain even with a light on. I have been told that a rear
projection CRT would have less eye strain than a direct view. Silly
question but is this true

More about : hdtv eye doctor

Anonymous
November 24, 2004 3:17:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 00:17:58 GMT, me <me@nospamm.com> wrote:

>I love my crt hdtv altho I have tuned down the contrast it seems to cause
>my eye to strain even with a light on. I have been told that a rear
>projection CRT would have less eye strain than a direct view. Silly
>question but is this true


Two important questions: How far away are you from the screen and how
old are you?

-Dr. Jeff
November 24, 2004 4:55:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jeff OTF wrote:
> On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 00:17:58 GMT, me <me@nospamm.com> wrote:
>
>
>>I love my crt hdtv altho I have tuned down the contrast it seems to cause
>>my eye to strain even with a light on. I have been told that a rear
>>projection CRT would have less eye strain than a direct view. Silly
>>question but is this true
>
>
>
> Two important questions: How far away are you from the screen and how
> old are you?
>
> -Dr. Jeff
>
>
12 to 18 feet.
Pai9d my dues I will retire very soon
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Anonymous
November 24, 2004 9:26:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 01:55:46 GMT, Me <me@nnospam.com> wrote:

>
>
>Jeff OTF wrote:
>> On Wed, 24 Nov 2004 00:17:58 GMT, me <me@nospamm.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I love my crt hdtv altho I have tuned down the contrast it seems to cause
>>>my eye to strain even with a light on. I have been told that a rear
>>>projection CRT would have less eye strain than a direct view. Silly
>>>question but is this true
>>
>>
>>
>> Two important questions: How far away are you from the screen and how
>> old are you?
>>
>> -Dr. Jeff
>>
>>
>12 to 18 feet.
>Pai9d my dues I will retire very soon

Assuming that your distance vision, which is defined as 20 feet and
beyond, is corrected properly, you may need a presciption that is
slightly different for use at 12 feet. Once a person gets past their
late 40's, they usually do not have enough accommodation (the ability
to change focus) to see as comfortably as they used to at that 5 to 15
feet range.

A progressive ("no-line") bifocal may be the answer because it has
those intermediate ranges built in. However, depending on the angle of
the direction of the TV, there may be a slight head tilt necessary to
see where you want to see.

Some of my patients chose to simply leave their distance prescription
slightly under corrected if they are near-sighted or slightly over
corrected if they are far-sighted.

Hopefully, I answered your question.

-Dr. Jeff
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 3:29:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Great info Dr Jeff!!

I'm 46 and and got my first set of bifocals (no-line).
I got over the "Fishbowl effect" in just a few days.

When I get back into my house (Hurricane Ivan) in a
few months and build the new Home Theater, if I run
into a prob I'll make a pleading post for help here. LOL

Going with a 60" Plasma, LCD, or DLP.
And have about 20' of viewing distance to adjust
with to adapt to now watching a 60".

Jeff OTF wrote:

>
>Assuming that your distance vision, which is defined as 20 feet and
>beyond, is corrected properly, you may need a presciption that is
>slightly different for use at 12 feet. Once a person gets past their
>late 40's, they usually do not have enough accommodation (the ability
>to change focus) to see as comfortably as they used to at that 5 to 15
>feet range.
>
>A progressive ("no-line") bifocal may be the answer because it has
>those intermediate ranges built in. However, depending on the angle of
>the direction of the TV, there may be a slight head tilt necessary to
>see where you want to see.
>
>Some of my patients chose to simply leave their distance prescription
>slightly under corrected if they are near-sighted or slightly over
>corrected if they are far-sighted.
>
>Hopefully, I answered your question.
>
>-Dr. Jeff
>
>
>

--
Ric Seyler
Anonymous
November 24, 2004 6:10:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jeff OTF" <DONOTSPAMjeffotf@bigfoot.com> wrote
> Assuming that your distance vision, which is defined as 20 feet and
> beyond, is corrected properly, you may need a presciption that is
> slightly different for use at 12 feet. Once a person gets past their
> late 40's, they usually do not have enough accommodation (the ability
> to change focus) to see as comfortably as they used to at that 5 to 15
> feet range.
>
> A progressive ("no-line") bifocal may be the answer because it has
> those intermediate ranges built in. However, depending on the angle of
> the direction of the TV, there may be a slight head tilt necessary to
> see where you want to see.
>
> Some of my patients chose to simply leave their distance prescription
> slightly under corrected if they are near-sighted or slightly over
> corrected if they are far-sighted.

I wear bifocals and had a pair of "TV glasses" made. They just use the
top -- distance-viewing -- part of the bifocal lens prescription. Wearing
them, I can lean way back in my recliner and watch TV in comfort without
having to struggle with my bifocals to keep the TV in focus.

mack
austin
!