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Is HDTV worth the price?

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Anonymous
November 27, 2004 11:57:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation costs
are extremely high. About how much is that?

A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
better to wait?


Thanks, Brad

More about : hdtv worth price

Anonymous
November 27, 2004 11:57:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Bradley Burton wrote:
>
> How are the HDTV's?

If you like live Professional Sports or Stunning Nature shows,
Getting a HDTV now, even for the timid, is OK IF
you live in a locale which offers HD Programming & you have
a $1000 bucks to spend...



I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV.

When you pass a grainy or Poor Analog signal thru a
Digital HDTV you will get a worst picture.. true...

When you pass a nice clear Analog signal thru a
Digital HDTV with 'Good Guts' your picture will be
very good! A poor Analog Signal thru Good HD guts
still makes for a poor resulting picture...


I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
> best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true?

IF you wish to miss all the Current HDTV Programming today,
yes, you can save money by sticking to a 4:3 Analog TV....



Also, I heard the installation costs
> are extremely high. About how much is that?

In many cases a delivery cost of a 'heavier HD set) is $50...
And you may have to pay for Digital Tuner ($200), UHF
antenna ($25), OR added HD Cable Service ($20 per mo), OR
Dish / Satellite Service ($50/mo)....


>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
> I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
> better to wait?

I read/receive Consumers Report.... I think they (CR) scare
more potential HDTV owners who are uninformed into
taking a wait & see buy situation... THey don't give
a fully complete story on the state of HDTV... It has
been in transition for 5.5 years now.... and IF
live in a Community that has either Local or Cable
HD on 4 or more networks, BUY...... THere are
basically 7 HD National Networks plus 10 or more
HD independently run channels....


>
> Thanks, Brad
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 12:06:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I just got into it with a sony 50" rp lcd. I have a Motorola HD receiver
connected with monster component cables. Don't have the sound system to go
with it yet for full surround but I have been impressed with the sound
straight out of the TV.

Overall, when you go to the HD signals with the TV: unequalled quality;
blows me away, actually. Is it any better than it would be on a 36" crt?
Probably not but it isn't 36", it's 50"! I just finished watching the
second part of Lord of the Rings, which I found very grainy in the theatre,
on the movie network's HD station and it was really nice.

Watching ota stations bugs me because a) of the black bars and b) I don't
see the same quality as in the hd broadcasts. I know I can zoom out the
black bars but to be truthful, the quality (in my eyes) suffers when I do
that. My cable provider sends all signals as digital but I don't like the
quality when they are zoomed. The picture, inside of the bars, is not that
bad, however. I guess it gets reduced to around a 36" picture, so it's a
good comparison with my regular set.

Would I do it again. In a heartbeat! There's no turning back now, if you
want a large size picture. Remember, crt goes to what, 40" max, (if it's
still available).

Sounds like you're not in any hurry though, so you'll probably be seeing
much lower prices soon. Sony has a promotion on now (in my parts) where
they throw in the stand, a DVD recorder and satellite hardware. Not
discounting the sets but throwing in lots of extras!

Take care

PS: One problem I have been noticing is that the audio on HD stations plays
much lower than the ota stations. Anyone have a cause/fix for this?



"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually
> the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation
> costs are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or
> would it be better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad
>
Related resources
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 12:06:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

edee em wrote:
>
> I just got into it with a sony 50" rp lcd. I have a Motorola HD receiver
> connected with monster component cables. Don't have the sound system to go
> with it yet for full surround but I have been impressed with the sound
> straight out of the TV.
>
> Overall, when you go to the HD signals with the TV: unequalled quality;
> blows me away, actually. Is it any better than it would be on a 36" crt?
> Probably not but it isn't 36", it's 50"! I just finished watching the
> second part of Lord of the Rings, which I found very grainy in the theatre,
> on the movie network's HD station and it was really nice.
>
> Watching ota stations bugs me because a) of the black bars and b) I don't
> see the same quality as in the hd broadcasts. I know I can zoom out the
> black bars but to be truthful, the quality (in my eyes) suffers when I do
> that. My cable provider sends all signals as digital but I don't like the
> quality when they are zoomed. The picture, inside of the bars, is not that
> bad, however. I guess it gets reduced to around a 36" picture, so it's a
> good comparison with my regular set.
>
> Would I do it again. In a heartbeat! There's no turning back now, if you
> want a large size picture. Remember, crt goes to what, 40" max, (if it's
> still available).
>
> Sounds like you're not in any hurry though, so you'll probably be seeing
> much lower prices soon. Sony has a promotion on now (in my parts) where
> they throw in the stand, a DVD recorder and satellite hardware. Not
> discounting the sets but throwing in lots of extras!
>
> Take care
>



> PS: One problem I have been noticing is that the audio on HD stations plays
> much lower than the ota stations. Anyone have a cause/fix for this?

I had bad audio loudness variations when switching Cable HD or SD

Channels on a Time Warner SA-3250-HD Cable Box...

FIX: Go into the Set Top Box users menu under Audio...

Change Audio from Variable to FIXED and Sounds are

now very level among channel changes...




>
> "Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> > How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> > clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually
> > the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation
> > costs are extremely high. About how much is that?
> >
> > A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> > Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or
> > would it be better to wait?
> >
> >
> > Thanks, Brad
> >
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 12:17:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message news:<JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52>...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
> best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation costs
> are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
> I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
> better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad

It depends on a few things. First, to address the issue with Consumer
Reports, they are saying that it's too much hassel for the average US
consumer to take on. Their stance seems to be that it should be
something we could just plug in and it work. I think all consumer
products should be that way if they can, but some things just aren't.
If you lived by that motto we'd all be working on Apple computers
instead of PCs. If you're the kind of person who hates to tinker with
technology and tweak anything, then HDTV is not for you.

If you don't mind spending a few hours doing some research, then HDTV
is a very rewarding (sorry, couldn't think of a better word) thing. My
wife was skeptical when I wanted to lay down $2000 for a TV, now she
loves and watches the thing more than I do. In about 10 minutes I was
able to teach her the settings she needed to know about and after that
it's easy.

Is HDTV ready for consumers? programming wise, that's a big YES! All
the over the air networks have embraced HDTV: CSB, NBC, ABC, FOX , WB,
UPN. All the top rated shows are simucast in HD (almost all of CBS,NBC
and ABC's primetime lineup, save the reality TV shows). Most major
sports games are broadcast in HD. Most special events (Oscars, Music
Awards, etc...) are as well.

The catch of this is getting this programming; is it available in your
area? If you live in/near a major city the answer is yes. If not, you
need to check with your local broadcasters to see what's avaialble for
free over-the-air. Once you know that, then you have to make sure
you're buying a set that has an HDTV over-the-air tuner built in (this
is where it begins to get a little tricky and Consumer Reports, writes
of average joe consumer as not wanting to put up with learning
anything about technology). So HDTV is sent out as a digital signal,
it requires a special kind of tuner to get it free over-the-air. Some
sets have these built in (they are usually refered to as Integrated
HDTV sets, sets without are usually branded as HD Ready).

So if a set has a tuner built in, great. If not, that's ok too,
because you can get the HD broadcast from a subscription service (Dish
Network, DirectTV, Cable) usually for a very nominal fee of $4-$10
more a month for an HD-enabled cable box. Again, this is one of those
things were you have to check with your subscription service provider
and see what they offer in your area.

That's really the most difficult part of it, then you have hookups. HD
requires special kind of cabling and you have a few different options
for what kind of cable you want to use. Then you have aspect ratios to
deal with, the problem of aspect ratio comes from the fact the
"normal", non-HD television is more square (4:3) than rectangular
(16:9 widescreen). HD broadcast are always widescreen, so manufactuers
have come up different kinds of zoom/stetch modes to make watching
normal television look good on HDTV.

Lastly, you have the battle of brands. Consumer Reports only touched
on sets you can get at Best Buy, Circut City, etc... I think they gave
Sony the best all around award, last year it was Toshiba, but
regardless, Consumer Reports should fire the panel who did this eval,
because their is still a considerable amount of value added in going
with the "higher end" products. For example, Toshiba offers a Cinema
series line (HX series) that's well worth the few hundred dollars
extra it cost over the the normal H series, Consumer Reports did not
review this set. Hitachi wasn't even listed, and their product is
superior to Sony in terms of picture quality, features and
servicability (cost to service) and the MSRP on Hitachi's are even
less.

The thing Consumer Reports hates is that HDTV isn't a product you can
just walk into an appliance store and buy at this point. If you know
nothing about this technology, you have to either educate yourself (I
have a pretty good website of information, see under my sig below) or
you have to go to a speciality store such as Tweeter or the Home
Theater Store and let them explain everything, you may even want to
let them do the hookups for you. Some of them will gladly do this for
a $50-$100 installation/delivery fee. If you buy from a good dealer
you're not going to have any problems and HDTV will be very easy to
"get". If you buy from Best Buy and go in knowing nothing, then you've
ask for that hell (note: Toshiba won't even let Best Buy carry their
HX line).

P.S. I've had HDTV in my home for about nine months now, I absolutely
love it. I even financed my set (something I initally felt extreemly
guility for doing), I have and have never had any regrets. In fact
when people ask me what I think of HDTV, nine months later I still
tell them "it's incredible". I love it. I think most people here would
agree.

-Jeremy

HDTV Buyers FAQ
http://hdtv.0catch.com








So what's all the fuss about?
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 12:20:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

This is a very subjective topic. I sunk 8 grand into a plasma HDTV, which I
use strictly for OTA viewing (and for DVDs, which aren't HD), and it is
worth it to me. Some folks would consider me crazy, but it was my money, and
I ain't complaining.

Look around and see what is out there, and if it is worth it to you, you
will know when to make your move. Otherwise, wait until it is.

Phil


"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually
> the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation
> costs are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or
> would it be better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad
>
November 28, 2004 12:20:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 21:20:04 GMT, "Phil Ross" <paross@pacbell.net>
wrote:

>This is a very subjective topic. I sunk 8 grand into a plasma HDTV, which I
>use strictly for OTA viewing (and for DVDs, which aren't HD), and it is
>worth it to me. Some folks would consider me crazy, but it was my money, and
>I ain't complaining.
>
>Look around and see what is out there, and if it is worth it to you, you
>will know when to make your move. Otherwise, wait until it is.
>
>Phil
>

If I had the 8 grand, I'd buy one too ;) 

however....
November 28, 2004 1:54:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 20:57:13 GMT, "Bradley Burton"
<bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:

>How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
>clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
>best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation costs
>are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
>A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
>I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
>better to wait?
>

Wait for what? This isn't a dress rehearsal.
Thumper
>
>Thanks, Brad
>

To reply drop XYZ in address
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 3:21:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Depends on the price probably

I got a 56" DLP HDTV for $2000. If I had to spend $7-9000 for a Plasma, it
wouldn't be worth it.

I won't have an HDTV signal til DirecTV HDTVTivo box comes down in price
($999 - anyone know why it's so high?)

My picture w/out an HDTV signal is incredible compared to my 15 year old 53"
CRT RPTV that died.


--
Barry


"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually
> the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation
> costs are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or
> would it be better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad
>
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 3:21:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Brynk wrote:
> Depends on the price probably
>
> I got a 56" DLP HDTV for $2000. If I had to spend $7-9000 for a
> Plasma, it wouldn't be worth it.
>
> I won't have an HDTV signal til DirecTV HDTVTivo box comes down in
> price ($999 - anyone know why it's so high?)

Because people like me are gladly handing over the cash to own one. It's
probably the best part of my home theater. I got mine for $980, but probably
would have paid twice that to get a hold of one.

It's also priced like that because of everything it does. OTA HDTV receiver
with two tuners, HDTV satellite receiver with two tuners, and PVR
functionality. Try building a computer that can record two separate HD
feeds, play back a third, and comes with a remote control. You'll pay a hell
of a lot more than $999.

<snip>

--
tooloud
Remove nothing to reply...
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 3:40:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

From what you say it's reasonable and not likely to come down

I heard something about .......a licensing dispute or something that runs
til next April...prices could then drop
However this is hardly a reliable story

I can live w/out the HDTV signal, but would not want to be w/out Tivo.

Barry


"tooloud" <nospam.jake@mchsi.com> wrote in message
news:30skauF334ddrU1@uni-berlin.de...
> Brynk wrote:
>> Depends on the price probably
>>
>> I got a 56" DLP HDTV for $2000. If I had to spend $7-9000 for a
>> Plasma, it wouldn't be worth it.
>>
>> I won't have an HDTV signal til DirecTV HDTVTivo box comes down in
>> price ($999 - anyone know why it's so high?)
>
> Because people like me are gladly handing over the cash to own one. It's
> probably the best part of my home theater. I got mine for $980, but
> probably would have paid twice that to get a hold of one.
>
> It's also priced like that because of everything it does. OTA HDTV
> receiver with two tuners, HDTV satellite receiver with two tuners, and PVR
> functionality. Try building a computer that can record two separate HD
> feeds, play back a third, and comes with a remote control. You'll pay a
> hell of a lot more than $999.
>
> <snip>
>
> --
> tooloud
> Remove nothing to reply...
>
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 4:25:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Once your eyes get use to watching hdtv, it looks just like digital which is
pretty good in itself. To me its not worth the money. Wait until 2006 when the
country is suppose to stop transmitting analog and go full speed ahead with
hdtv. By then, hopefully you won't have to pay extra for movies, channels that
broadcast hd. Imagine if you had to pay extra to watch color tv back in the
'60's when if came out full force...with still b & w shows slowly being
converted to color. This is what they are doing with hd now, except for hd that
one gets over OTA...CBS is my favorite and freeeeeeeee...like its suppose to
be.
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 4:52:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004, Bradley Burton <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
> best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation costs
> are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
> I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
> better to wait?

I was coming from poor analog reception about 40-50 miles out with
interference, if not snow on every channel (cable got too expensive for me
in 1995, when I figured DVD rentals were cheaper). So I got an OTA
digital set top box first to make sure I could get reception. Even
digitally broadcast SD channels were much better than analog (no snow or
interference), but widescreen broadcasts were scrunched on a 4:3 screen.

Many of the CRT TVs do not seem sharp enough and/or have screen
reflections (no anti-glare coating). While window shopping for TVs
costing thousands of dollars, I jumped on a 27" LCD for under $1200.
Maybe not optimum for a large family, but larger vertically than my old
20" 4:3 CRT TV and much wider. I would have liked a 42-43" LCD RPTV, but
those were at least double the money. When I can afford something bigger
(or prices come down), the LCD can become a bedroom TV (or PC monitor).
I also got an up converting DVD player and at 720p on DVI, it is
noticeably sharper with more uniform colors than progressive 480p on
component cables (maybe because optimized for my 1280x720 LCD).

If you need a TV there are many bargains on 4:3 TVs. And you can get an
over the air digital tuner that can display on any TV better than many
people with poor reception can imagine. But that will just make you long
for the widescreen you wish you had.
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 6:18:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <c89qd.5236852$ic1.488500@news.easynews.com>,
"Brynk" <Brnk@NoDirecpc.com> wrote:

> I can live w/out the HDTV signal

I can't. I'd rather not watch anything.

m-m
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 10:04:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

harri85274@aol.com (Harri85274) wrote in message news:<20041127202527.21787.00001116@mb-m12.aol.com>...
> Once your eyes get use to watching hdtv, it looks just like digital which is
> pretty good in itself. To me its not worth the money. Wait until 2006 when the
> country is suppose to stop transmitting analog and go full speed ahead with
> hdtv. By then, hopefully you won't have to pay extra for movies, channels that
> broadcast hd. Imagine if you had to pay extra to watch color tv back in the
> '60's when if came out full force...with still b & w shows slowly being
> converted to color. This is what they are doing with hd now, except for hd that
> one gets over OTA...CBS is my favorite and freeeeeeeee...like its suppose to
> be.



If you think HD looks just like digital, then what's going to
magically happen in 2006 that's going to make it suddenly better?
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 8:38:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> > Once your eyes get use to watching hdtv, it looks just like digital...

>
> If you think HD looks just like digital, then what's going to
> magically happen in 2006 that's going to make it suddenly better?

If a person cannot see the big difference, I suspect he is using
audio-video cables (R,W,Y) instead of component video (Y,Pr,Pb) I've
seen this too often.

m-m
Anonymous
November 28, 2004 11:45:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52:

> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are
> less clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is
> actually the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the
> installation costs are extremely high. About how much is that?

It was certainly worth the price for me. I bought my TV (a 27" direct
view Samsung 4:3 HDTV that takes 1080i, 480p and 480i component inputs)
last May. I've NEVER seen a conventional TV that displays SD pictures
this clearly. It's especially marvellous when I'm watching a really good
source such as an anamorphic DVD. And the HD reception is crystal clear
on my satellite box (Star Choice, using the same technology as Voom is).

> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now,
> or would it be better to wait?

As at any time in a rapidly changing technological industry, there are
decisions to be made about the right time to buy and what to buy at any
given time. If I had more money I would probably have gone for one of
the larger TV sets, but I didn't and I live in a fairly small apartment
and sit fairly close to the set so I didn't really need a huge screen.

Take your time. Investigate all the options. Try and get some advice
from someone who knows and, if you're thinking of plunking down several
thousand dollars, don't be afraid to pay a consultant for a bit of advice
or at least to ask here. There are people here with experience with just
about all aspects of HDTV.

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 1:31:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thank you for the responses. I have one more question if you don't mind.
Will TIVO record TV programs that are broadcast in HDTV (I know they can't
record them in HDTV format, but can TIVO record them at all?) Basically,
I'm wondering if TIVO is defunct when it comes to HD broadcasts.

Thank you,
Brad


"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually
> the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation
> costs are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or
> would it be better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad
>
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 1:31:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message news:<nlsqd.111482$5K2.58060@attbi_s03>...
> Thank you for the responses. I have one more question if you don't mind.
> Will TIVO record TV programs that are broadcast in HDTV (I know they can't
> record them in HDTV format, but can TIVO record them at all?) Basically,
> I'm wondering if TIVO is defunct when it comes to HD broadcasts.
>
> Thank you,
> Brad
>

Brad,

No TiVO can not record HD. There's really no way to downgrade an HD
sig to SD without getting some strange screen artifacts... There are
HD DVR products on the market now, they are rather expensive to own.
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 4:14:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Harri85274 <harri85274@aol.com> wrote in message news:20041127202527.21787.00001116@mb-m12.aol.com...
> Once your eyes get use to watching hdtv, it looks just like digital which is
> pretty good in itself. To me its not worth the money. Wait until 2006 when the
> country is suppose to stop transmitting analog and go full speed ahead with
> hdtv.


Yours is a common misunderstanding.

The FCC has not mandated HDTV.

The FCC has mandated Digital TV,
which includes Standard Definition TV.

There is NO entitlement to HDTV.
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 8:13:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <d4e30081.0411281907.a62d396@posting.google.com>,
jmason@funnydelight.co.uk (JamesMason) wrote:

> No TiVO can not record HD. There's really no way to downgrade an HD
> sig to SD without getting some strange screen artifacts...

But I can watch an HD station over a regular video antenna input (not
component) and see the HD as SD and it looks as good as any SD.

m-m
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 8:40:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually
> the best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation
> costs are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
> Basically I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or
> would it be better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad
>
You can argue that it's worth it if you can afford it. I wouldn't borrow
money to make the purchase.

If the local broadcasters in your area have made the transition to HDTV and
you can receive the signal
either through cable or direct then it might be worth considering. Even if
they have made the change much of their programming will be from older 4:3
analog sources that don't look very good compared to what you will see from
HD programming.

DVD 480P movies made from a well done digital transfer look extremely good.
That alone might justify the purchase of an HD set for someone who watches
mostly DVDs. However, some DVD films made from poorly executed digital
transfers (2010 and Outland are a couple of examples but there are a lot of
them out there) will look miserable.

If your old 4:3 set is still working and providing a satisfying viewing
experience then it won't hurt to wait. Let the technologies used to deliver
HD mature a few more years and give the networks and local broadcasters time
to transition into the HD world.

If you decide to make the plunge spend some time studying the different HDTV
technologies available.

Regarding installation costs, not sure what you are referring to. There
might be some delivery and set up costs. Those can be negotiated at the
time of purchase.


Ed
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 8:51:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"JamesMason" <jmason@funnydelight.co.uk> wrote in message
news:D 4e30081.0411281907.a62d396@posting.google.com...
> "Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:<nlsqd.111482$5K2.58060@attbi_s03>...
>> Thank you for the responses. I have one more question if you don't mind.
>> Will TIVO record TV programs that are broadcast in HDTV (I know they
>> can't
>> record them in HDTV format, but can TIVO record them at all?) Basically,
>> I'm wondering if TIVO is defunct when it comes to HD broadcasts.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> Brad
>>
>
> Brad,
>
> No TiVO can not record HD. There's really no way to downgrade an HD
> sig to SD without getting some strange screen artifacts... There are
> HD DVR products on the market now, they are rather expensive to own.

If you plan to use cable for your HD programs contact your local cable
company for an answer.
Our cable box has an 80gb hard drive that can record HD for later viewing.
Some of the boxes
will allow you to add additional storage with an external hard drive.

Ed
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 7:54:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

JamesMason wrote:
> "Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:<nlsqd.111482$5K2.58060@attbi_s03>...
>> Thank you for the responses. I have one more question if you don't
>> mind.
>> Will TIVO record TV programs that are broadcast in HDTV (I know they
>> can't
>> record them in HDTV format, but can TIVO record them at all?)
>> Basically,
>> I'm wondering if TIVO is defunct when it comes to HD broadcasts.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> Brad
>>
>
> Brad,
>
> No TiVO can not record HD. There's really no way to downgrade an HD
> sig to SD without getting some strange screen artifacts... There are
> HD DVR products on the market now, they are rather expensive to own.

Eh, I wouldn't say that's entirely true. First of all, there are Tivos that
can record HD; there's been one in my basement for months. Second, pretty
much anything that's broadcast as HD is broadcast as SD as well, so it's not
like you're going to miss anything. Lastly, if you get a Toshiba integrated
HDTV, you'll soon be able to add the Symbio HD DVR to it for under $500.

--
tooloud
Remove nothing to reply...
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 3:41:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV.

Not true.

> I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
> best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true?

I believe for most people buying into HDTV (HDTV reciever + TV) is not
worth it for the average person.

If you want to get a widescreen display for DVD's, it might be worth it.
But there are lots of options besides buying a large, expensive HDTV set.
If you just want a home theater on the cheap for DVD's, you can buy a media
projector for under 1000 dollars that will do a good job (provided you have
a wall to place a screen on). However, this would be a poor choice for
everyday TV watching because the bulbs will wear out and are expensive, if
you leave the "set" on all the time. You can also now buy smaller
widescreen sets that are HDTV ready. You can just hook them up to a
set-top-box and watch regular programming, or to a DVD player (progressive
scan DVD players are now around 50-60 dollars). They have buttons on the
remote so you can reformat the screen for non widescreen materials, and DVD
players such as Samsung have different zoom options.

At present there's no affordable way to record HDTV content, and there's
only one or two HDTV DVR's (Tivo) and they are quite expensive.

Digital satellite has some of the benefits of HDTV, such as lack of analog
noise. Some of the channels also have a reasonable amount of compression
and look OK, while other channels have obvious compression artifacts (but
still better than a mediocre analog signal). Digital cable is usually much
more compressed and may not look as good- many of the channels are
"VHS-quality".

> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them.
Basically
> I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it
be
> better to wait?

Consumer Reports is usually a good reviewer, I'd trust what they say.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 7:23:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Is HDTV worth the price?
Is a $20 filet mignon worth its price while you can buy a $2
hamburger? Only you can answer such question. Everyone's value system
and financial situations will lead to different answers. How can my
answer help your decision?

Is this HDTV worth its price more than that HDTV? When given the same
type of products, you can clearly see some are too expensive compared
to other alternatives. E.g. plasma TVs are way overpriced in my
opinion.

Buying a regular TV at the dawn of the HDTV era? Are you out of your
mind? There are only two choices in my book. Buy a HDTV now, or buy
a HDTV later. Unless you plan to throw away that new TV in couple of
years.

HDTV is great. With 5.1 surround sound and superb picture quality,
your TV viewing enjoyment reaches a different level, assuming you
already have 5.1 audio equipment.

The only problem is that HD programming is not enough. HD stations
only do a few hours each day or rerun the same thing 50+ times. If
you only watch primetime programs, the current level of HD programming
is marginally acceptable because there are still many non-HD programs
during primetime. If you believe the hardware price will continue to
drop, it is okay to wait couple more years. When at lease all
primetime shows are in HD, then it would be a good time to buy.




"Bradley Burton" <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote in message news:<JS5qd.96906$V41.45576@attbi_s52>...
> How are the HDTV's? I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
> best buy (over HDTV's). Is this true? Also, I heard the installation costs
> are extremely high. About how much is that?
>
> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
> I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
> better to wait?
>
>
> Thanks, Brad
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 10:30:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Caloonese" <caloonese@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ee67c74a.0412011623.63ae6731@posting.google.com...
> Is HDTV worth the price?
> Is a $20 filet mignon worth its price while you can buy a $2
> hamburger? Only you can answer such question. Everyone's value system
> and financial situations will lead to different answers. How can my
> answer help your decision?

agreed

depends on how much disposable income you have and what you want to spend it
on

But if you can part with $2500 or so without pain and you really like to
watch movies/sports/TV, then yes.

The image quality of HD is superior to that of all but the best theaters.

NBC had Shrek on last week and it was incredible - looked much better than
it looked at the mall cineplex and I thought it was beautiful back then.
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 10:26:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"edee em" <emarano@cogeco.ca> wrote in message
news:toaqd.16458$14.5680@read1.cgocable.net...
:<snip>
: PS: One problem I have been noticing is that the audio on HD
stations plays
: much lower than the ota stations. Anyone have a cause/fix for this?

Yes, I've noticed the same. But, at the same time now the analog
audio sounds very loud and distorted while the digital 5.1 audio is,
while lower in volume, much more sharp and very listenable (is that a
word?)! Use them watts and crank it up a bit :) 

Russ
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:04:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <163sd.35562$bP2.10094@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com>,
qwerty.kw5kw@swbell.net.qwerty says...
>
> "edee em" <emarano@cogeco.ca> wrote in message
> news:toaqd.16458$14.5680@read1.cgocable.net...
> :<snip>
> : PS: One problem I have been noticing is that the audio on HD
....
> Yes, I've noticed the same. But, at the same time now the analog
> audio sounds very loud and distorted while the digital 5.1 audio is,
> while lower in volume, much more sharp and very listenable (is that a
> word?)! Use them watts and crank it up a bit :) 
>
> Russ
DD is, by design, -6db different. So yes its less loud, but higher
quality. "If you need to crank it up a bit".
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 12:30:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Timothy Springer (tnsprin@nobody.nonet) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> In article <163sd.35562$bP2.10094@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com>,
> qwerty.kw5kw@swbell.net.qwerty says...
> > Yes, I've noticed the same. But, at the same time now the analog
> > audio sounds very loud and distorted while the digital 5.1 audio is,
> > while lower in volume, much more sharp and very listenable (is that a
> > word?)! Use them watts and crank it up a bit :) 
> >
> DD is, by design, -6db different.

No, it isn't. The default setting for the dialog normalization is -4dB
(not -6dB), but there is no reason it has to be kept at the default. Many
DVDs do this.

--
Jeff Rife |
SPAM bait: | http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/CloseToHome/NamespacePollu...
AskDOJ@usdoj.gov |
spam@ftc.gov |
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 9:11:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In alt.tv.tech.hdtv, Bradley Burton <bradbadNOSPAM@comcast.net> wrote:
> How are the HDTV's?

Go to an electronics store and see for yourself. Personally, I find it
hard to watch regular TV after staring at HD for a while. That being
said, at home, I watch standard TV for several reasons.


I heard that sometimes the basic channels are less
> clear than a regular TV. I've even heard that a regular TV is actually the
> best buy (over HDTV's).

That is like comparing a pickup truck and a Mazda Miata. Which is the
best buy? There's some direct comparison, but they are very different
products.



> A magazine (Consumer Reports?) gave a pretty bad review on them. Basically
> I'm wondering whether the HDTV's are worth buying right now, or would it be
> better to wait?

It depends on your situation as much as anything. They are what they are
and they cost what they cost. I wouldn't choose HD over food and
clothing, but if you have sufficient resources, it would be foolish not
to get HD. Likely you are somewhere in the middle.

--
In the councils of government, we must guard against the
acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought,
by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the
disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.
-- Dwight David Eisenhower
!