IS there such a thing as a router that just routes?

I have been looking for years to find a router that just routes.I keep buying routers that always block some kind of port.I dont want that,i just want a router so i can run my Playstation and computer without having to juggle connections and disconnections.
Does such a router exist that only routes or does every router that exists have some kind of port blocking so i need to mess with port forwarding and all that?
Please,somebody tell me a router exists that really for God's sake only routes.I can and do use software for firewall purposes.Does a routing company out there understand this and make a router just for routing purposes alone? :cry:


Sincerely
Ravage777
35 answers Last reply
More about thing router routes
  1. I think it's called a HUB!

    If all you are doing is sharing a connection you don't need a router.
    All you need is a Hub or at most a switch.

    Edit: HOWEVER COMMA....if you run your internet connection from the modem to the hub or switch and it's an always on connection, you are going to get hacked.
  2. Quote:
    I think it's called a HUB!

    If all you are doing is sharing a connection you don't need a router.
    All you need is a Hub or at most a switch.

    Edit: HOWEVER COMMA....if you run your internet connection from the modem to the hub or switch and it's an always on connection, you are going to get hacked.


    Well, a hub might work, but there are routers that only route and do not filter. I'm not sure if you will find a reasonably priced router for home though, as the only ones I can think of cost a lot more than the consumer wants to spend.

    Have you checked to see if you can hack a WRT54G so it only does routing and not filtering? I use OpenWRT on mine.

    Keep in mind you will still want to NAT your IP addresses, unless you setup something with your ISP. Otherwise, the packets will never get back to you, and you will be dead in the water.

    About the hacking, there are firewalls for computers, so they should protect you. Even though your system is behind a network firewall, it is still a good idea to run a firewall on each system. Additionally, an unprotected computer connected via dialup can get infected/hacked.

    EDIT: Now that I think more about this, you'll still need to mess with port forwarding. For example, say you want port 8080 opened to your PC and 12345 opened to your PS3. There's no way for the router to know which port should go to what IP, unless you direct it. So, stick with your current router. Performing port forwarding isn't a difficult operation.
  3. I'm using the D-Link 4100 Gaming Router and it works fine with 3 PCs and my PS3. No problem and lag even all the system are running and using online whether surfing or gaming. Easy to setup and very fast thus minimizing the pings or latency. I've been using this router for a year now and it's still one of the best router to online gaming.

    No, this router does not meet your requirement as it is very easy to setup, lots of features to mention "Gaming Fuel" to prioritize gaming data and etc. I don't know what firmware I'm using with this router but I got the one default and it works fine. Test it for yourself.

    http://img299.imageshack.us/img299/7348/untitledtf5.th.png
  4. I wont ever use both at the same time(Playstation 3 and my PC).I also dont leave it on as an always on connection and i turn it off when im done gaming.
    Because i meet these requirements can i find a router that just routes?
    How would i go about finding one because all the router sites i go to dont specify and then when i buy one it turns out to have some kind of port blocking.I have even purchased routers that have port blocking built in but labeled as no firewalls.I think that's what NAT is.
    Should i search for something called a hub or maybe search for something called a switch?
    Switch is a pretty broad search term.
    Boy i hope this works,i've allready worn out one cat5 cable because after plugging and un-plugging so many times the plastic locking switch part broke and it wouldnt stay in the plug hole so i had to replace it at almost 20$ a pop because i like the best cords.
    Actually i think it was a cat7,i'm thinking cat5 because thats what my modem to pc patch cable is but the phone company says i have to use thier cord or it wont work but for relay radio shack says i can use cat7 cables(or cat6,i dont recall except i know its not cat5)because they're faster for an additional 10$ a pop every 6.mo. when the cable end breaks from plugging and unplugging it so much.


    Sincerely
    Ravage777
  5. Whats wrong with enabling port forwarding?

    Try a Dlink. I have a Dlink604, and it allows me to put one IP address into what they call the DMZ. This removes all port blocking, and exposes the device to all the horrors of the internet. I use it from time to time when I play a game with someone over the internet.
  6. All routers route and by default consumer routers (d-link, netgear etc) come with predefine access lists which block and allow certain ports, protocols directions and stuff like that. If you don't want to block anything all you have to do is configure the access list inside of you router to allow everything, below is an example of what you'd want your filter or access to look like.

    # | Source IP | Destination IP | Protocol | Action
    1 | Any IP | Any IP | All | Allow

    What you seem to really want is a switch which just forwards all traffic to whatever is plugged into it by default.
  7. Go to the setup page of your router and put the IP of your computer and the IP of your PS3 at the DMZ (demilitarized zone) this option must be somewhere in the NAT menu or Port Forwarding menu of your router.If you do that any data incoming at any port that your router doesn't know what to do with them it will just forward them (route them) to your PC and PS3.
  8. Thank you so much everybody.I have learned that the reasons all routers have NAT is that they are all made for multiple things to use the same internet connection at the same time.NAT is the first firewall i came across and i couldnt hook to certain stuff and gaming sites(mainly gaming sites that are online play-like Gamespy was one of them{their customer service for help with routers is terrible because it took me 2 months just to get online,all the while paying for a broadband connection.}) because of NAT.I am not going to be using multiple stuff at the same time on one connection so i dont need NAT.
    Are there routers that exist that just route but dont have built in firewalls or NAT?
    That way i dont ever have to mess with configuring.I just plug it in and i'm good to go dependant upon which piece of hardware i have turned on at the time.
    Preferably one with a switch for on and off,but on a side note thats another thing i have never seen on a router.I'll just turn off my stuff when i'm done using it and i'm fine although i question whether or not it puts premature wear on a router to have it on 24/7.
    Is there a router with an off/on switch that doesn't have NAT or any built in firewalls? :?:


    Sincerely
    Ravage777
  9. I haven't purchased a router in several years. Are cable/dsl modems now integrated with a router? I have a Internet>DSL modem>Router>multiple PC setup. The point of having a router is to enable multiple connections plus a firewall. If you don't need those things, why not skip the router altogether and just plug into the modem?
  10. Quote:
    I haven't purchased a router in several years. Are cable/dsl modems now integrated with a router? I have a Internet>DSL modem>Router>multiple PC setup. The point of having a router is to enable multiple connections plus a firewall. If you don't need those things, why not skip the router altogether and just plug into the modem?


    yes, most dsl and cable modems are now routers by default, with firewall and all the stuff, hell most newer ones have wi fi with themtoo...

    btw....
    some to the topic starter: some routers do have the option to turn off the firewall.
    or disable all "firewall rules"
  11. There are no consumer level routers that do not come preconfigured with access rules. You can always turn them off.

    The more expensive option is to buy a commercial router (think Cisco) and program it to just your external IP address and your internal IP address and your default route.

    This requires a little bit of technical knowledge, such as setting up your IP addresses manually, and a few commands in Cisco IOS to set up the route from your internal network to you ISP, but you will get exactly what you want .... a router that just routes with no access rules in place.
  12. It's called switch (a hub does not route at all; it just multiplies..) and costs only a few bucks. And I don't see the problem in configuring your router a little bit. Should take you no more than 5 minutes to get it right...
  13. As the last guy said, but a swtich.
    This is what switches are designed to do.

    You don't want a router.
    These add overhead and other stuff.
    A switch just quickly passes your traffic.

    Yes, you can use a flamethrower to light candles, but why try and find a flamethower that will only put out a flame 1 inch so as to not melt you candle instantly. It could be done but why do it. The flamethrower is more expensive and not specifically designed to do that job even though it could.
  14. Dude :)
    You are "playing" with technology, so ya' have to "learn" how to employ tech, right? What you are now doing is plain stupid! Inexpensive home routers are all 10/100 Mbit, so CAT-5 cable "works" perfectly well ... if your hardware is 10/100 speed, certified gigabit cables do not add anything except cost! Why do you plug/unplug cables to the router?? ... simply turn off/shutdown the system you are not using and it's "functionally" unplugged (Make sure to set BIOS to NOT wake on LAN)

    I recommend you call a sales tech at several different network hardware manufacturers and tell'em what you "think" you want ... they will tell how "a cow eats da' cabbage", so you can learn :D
  15. Basically, the type of router you would be looking for is...

    http://cgi.ebay.com/CISCO-SYSTEMS-2600-SERIES-2620-ROUTER_W0QQitemZ290107673219QQihZ019QQcategoryZ67321QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    This is a Cisco 2600 series router. It will take some technical knowledge to set this up, but you will still be required to use NAT. If you configure it with regular IP addresses, it will be a possibility that they exist somewhere else on the internet. This is the purpose of NAT or Network Address Translation, so you can use a private IP addressing scheme with only 1 routable IP address. Your ISP will be able to detect that you're routing actual IPs and then block your modem.

    atp777
    Network Engineer
  16. What the heck are you brabbling about? Did you read the OP's question?
  17. Learn to use the router, it does not take much effort. Putting your computer exposed on the internet even for short periods of time is risky and a software firewall is not going to cut it, that is like putting an alarm system on your bedroom door instead of the outside exits of your home, they are already in your house.

    Once you have the port you need opened you're done. You wont have to reconfig every day.

    And for the love of god stop buying over priced cables. I seriously doubt that the performance increase across the 20 feet the cable runs is noticeable. You most likely don't have hardware that "truely" uses the benefits.
  18. Quote:
    As the last guy said, but a swtich.
    This is what switches are designed to do.

    You don't want a router.
    These add overhead and other stuff.
    A switch just quickly passes your traffic.

    Yes, you can use a flamethrower to light candles, but why try and find a flamethower that will only put out a flame 1 inch so as to not melt you candle instantly. It could be done but why do it. The flamethrower is more expensive and not specifically designed to do that job even though it could.


    I wonder why these people confuse layer 1-2 devices with other layer stuff
    layer 1 and 2 are MAC based, thats NO WAY ROUTING..
    switches are MAC based...
    thus NO ROUTING

    routing = tcp/ip stuff...
  19. I use a router LINKSYS WRT54G. My 2 PC's and PS3 is hardwired to it. It is very easy to set up and works like a charm. They even have new downloadable managment software that optimizes the settings for all connections. I would advise getting a router then just a switch or hub becasue of the additional options for security built in. Also the firmware updates keep it current. I have had 3 or 4 fimrware updates for the past year and half I have owned it. I don't think passive hubs or switches have that ability.
  20. Quote:
    As the last guy said, but a swtich.
    This is what switches are designed to do.

    You don't want a router.
    These add overhead and other stuff.
    A switch just quickly passes your traffic.

    Yes, you can use a flamethrower to light candles, but why try and find a flamethower that will only put out a flame 1 inch so as to not melt you candle instantly. It could be done but why do it. The flamethrower is more expensive and not specifically designed to do that job even though it could.


    I wonder why these people confuse layer 1-2 devices with other layer stuff
    layer 1 and 2 are MAC based, thats NO WAY ROUTING..
    switches are MAC based...
    thus NO ROUTING

    routing = tcp/ip stuff...


    Yep you are right. Me=bad. Sorry. Anyway you'll need the router to assign your IP's internally. A switch don't do that...
  21. You can't possibly be suggesting a Cisco router for someone that doesn't even know what a "router" is.

    NAT is pretty much what those Linksys/DLink routers ae for, you buy a home router, you get NAT. Port forwarding is simple from within the router configurations, only take a few minutes, setup once, shouldn't have to touch it again. Consult thew manual with your router for this.

    If you want to have 2 computers share an internet, a switch will not cut it. NAT makes sure that each device can go out to the net, and figure out what traffic comming in goes to which device plugged into the router (PS#
    3, PC).

    Starting to make sense?
  22. to the OP: You haven't done a good job describing your problem: You want a router that does what?
    You need port forwarding because of NAT: Network address translation. Unless you are directly connected to your gateway (READ: DSL or cable modem), you must have NAT if you have an application with some kind of special port requirement. There are a bunch of sites out there that will explain NAT to you: Why it's necessary, how to set up port forwarding, etc... My favorite one is http://portforward.com.
    I'm not sure about switches. I tried one before and it didn't work - A switch cannot give you an IP address like a router can - Most ISPs want each house to have only one IP address - If you use a switch only one device can be connected to the internet at a time. I tried a switch at my work - It turns out the device on the other end of the switch only wants to give out one IP address per physical port. With switches you can have multiple IP addresses per port. I'm not sure how one makes use of a switch. I'm not talking about switch-routers - a router with a switch attached to it. These are commonly called "Routers." I am talking about switches without routing functionality.
    You could try a IPv6 router. Supposedly this type of router eliminates the need for NAT. I'm not too sure about it. Maybe someone else knows if this will solve your problem?
  23. ok to the OP

    do not buy a hub. hubs slow networks down, you will be pissed off using a hub.

    CAT6 cable is only good for industrial LANs not for home internet usage. because your connection to the internet is (assuming you have standard DSL) only 1.5MB down stream you are buying cable that becomes pointless as soon as it hits the modem.

    a switch will allow you to have one internet connection(unless your using a router) but will not require any configuration. where a "home" router will have a switch in the back of it.

    but more to the point port forwarding is making your connection to the game servers faster, so by putting your pc and PS3 into a DMZ you will actually see a performance drop because all data traffic hits your pc/ps3 rather then just the data you specified to hit ie port forwarding . bottom line if you port forward in a firewall then your data gets to where its meant to go much faster.

    lastly when you run a software firewall what is running the firewall.....your computer!!! that means when your running a software firewall your cpu and ram are doing what your router can do, thus screwing with your game play.

    solution get a router(do your home work on whats right for you) with switch ports, about $45, and 2 Cat5e cables(one for the pc the other for the PS3) and forward the ports and leave it alone. you will be much happier i promise.

    and to the suggestion of IPv6 yes it gets rid of NAT/PAT but the devices capable of using it cost $100s if not $1000s, and besides the protocol only works on networks using IPv6 and your border(internet) routers have to translate it back to IPv4 just to use the internet meaning NAT comes back into play so one day but not now.
  24. Why are you not here more often? You seem to know what you're talking about, AND I think you were able to answer the OP's to the full content.

    Just stay here will ya?
  25. Quote:
    NAT is the first firewall...
    Are there routers that exist that just route but dont have built in firewalls or NAT?....
    Is there a router with an off/on switch that doesn't have NAT or any built in firewalls? :?:



    Here's the thing, plain and simple. By definition a router is made to route data, yeah. But here's the big thing, port forwarding is needed because all of the consumer grade routers are still dumb. Dumb in a sense that it couldn't know what device you really hook onto it, and also what applications you use. So for example downloading on bittorrent, it couldn't possibly instantly know what 'port' is assigned to it, so you need port forwarding. Also this is the same case for your PS3, unless it was set by the manufacturer it could'nt possibly know what port your PS3 uses. It actually doesn't even know that you hooked up a PS3 to it!


    The firewall and NAT part is pretty much the parts that don't need configuring, not counting though the port forwarding thing. Pretty much you need the firewall so hackers wouldn't be able to get control of your pc and get access to important files, also some worms could be stopped by a firewall. Though I see that you want to avoid the configuration part of it, I highly recommend that you still get a firewall; It's a case of 'prevention is better than cure' idealogy.

    Port forwarding isn't a hard thing for popular brands of routers now. PortForward.com (http://portforward.com) does provide a guide to common routers and the ports of programs and other hardware.
  26. the only way a switch would work is if he manually configured his PC and his playstation to the same IP address from his ISP (his ISP would have to support manual ip configuration through his modem) and make sure they are never turned on at the same time.

    I have done this before and it does work.

    If you want both devices connected at the same time to the same connection with only 1 ip address from his ISP, then he needs to have a router to connect his internal network (pc + playstation) to the external network (internet).

    I do not want to get into a detailed discussion about networking, I just wanted to provide a quick answer about getting a router that did not have acsecc rules.
  27. Quote:
    if he manually configured his PC and his playstation to the same IP address from his ISP


    That could definitely work. Though chair's would be flying if the brother/sister or anyone else for that matter, suddenly turns on the PC and the guy was already winning on an MMORPG on his/her PS3. :lol:
  28. Routers, by definition, filter. It's what they do. It's why they are routers and not switches. You can set up your router to route everything (DMZ) or just specific things (port forwarding) through to a specific port or IP address though.

    You probably need a router for your setup and you probably also want it to have an integrated DHCP server. Just set up the port forwarding.
  29. You -really- dont want to run a PC without the NAT stuff in place that the routers provide. Firewalls are great, but it's nice having that extra layer of protection. With firewall software, it's still your PC that's talking to the outside world. With the router, the traffic doesn't make it that far. If your router (or firewall software) supports it, just look how many port scans are going on all the time.

    Depending on how your ISP works, some device on the network needs to terminate the PPPOE/whatever session. Some DSL modems can be configured to do that, not sure about cable modems, but typically the home router does that. Some ISPs provide software that can as well (SBC did awhile back), but that software sucks.. and your PS3 wouldn't be able to do it. So just plugging in a cheap ethernet switch may not even be an option.
  30. Quote:


    I wonder why these people confuse layer 1-2 devices with other layer stuff
    layer 1 and 2 are MAC based, thats NO WAY ROUTING..
    switches are MAC based...
    thus NO ROUTING

    routing = tcp/ip stuff...


    I'm guessing because half the people who answered this thread don't even know what a 5/7layer OSI model means. This question was answered in the first few post, now its up to two pages because someone is to lazy to put an IP on a DMZ list or forward the correct ports if possible. (some games can't be properly forwarded with some routers.) Oh well, let him stumble around in the cloak of shadows for not listening...
  31. Oh wise person with encrypted name. Enlighten us please. :?
  32. Quote:
    I'm guessing because half the people who answered this thread don't even know what a 5/7layer OSI model means.
    Wikipedia has a good series of articles on the OSI model. Anyone interested should check it out.

    That said: The 1st OSI layer doesn't matter (It has nothing to do with the OP's question). Layers 4 thru 7 of the model don't matter (It has nothing to do w/ OP's question). Why do I need to know about OSI layers?
  33. Thank you everybody,that just about covers it.I've learned so much.I will try a router purchase again.It's just after so many times purchasing routers and neither the tech support people or the game sites can help me configure it i got fed up.(both tried and failed{the guy in India didn't have a clue,like he was reading the same manual i got or something})
    That information about the cables was very important because the guy at Radio Shack told me they are faster,he just didnt say if your moving a gigabyte or more though it's faster.
    It's kinda sad because i was one of his best cat cable customers.On a good note though now i got a brand new pile of cat5 cables that i know now are still totally good.And all this time i thought all those companys that keep giving me cat5 cables for free were cheapskates not giving me at least cat6 like i was buying.
    My modem even though i'm running 3mgs has only one connection and i asked the phone company if i could buy a modem with more than one connection but they said no and only they're modem will work so dont buy one at a store.So that option is out.
    I'm going to try one last time to buy a router but i am still going to look for one with an on/off switch and one that doesnt have NAT since i'm positive it still blocks some kind of ports hardware wise because it's built in and that's why i had to put my Netgear in a pile with the rest of them.
    It was blocking Gamespy ports and after trying to figure it out i was told its the NAT doing it and i have no choice but to get a better one.Thats how i got my Linksys and even though it supposedly doesnt have NAT it is still blocking some of my ports.And then there's the others but this is getting to long so thats all for now.
    I will try a router though but i am leaning more towards a switch if its not that expensive.I'll have to research it a bit more.I just really only want something that has more than one plug that my modem can hook into that as long as i'm only using one plug at a time actively i'll be fine.
    All this advice is AWSOME! and it will help me greatly in directing my research because until this thread i had never heard of a "switch" or an "hub".
    Seriously,Thank You everybody. :D


    Sincerely
    Ravage777
  34. Quote:
    You can set up your router to route everything (DMZ)
    How do you do this? I am using DD-WRT v23 SP2. When I go to the DMZ page it will only let me put one device in the DMZ.
  35. Then either switch them as needed, or do what was mentioned in post 7.

    Quote:
    # | Source IP | Destination IP | Protocol | Action
    1 | Any IP | Any IP | All | Allow
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