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Last response: in Networking
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April 24, 2007 10:35:05 PM

Hi I'm studying CISCO material right now for college. With the material I have I am unable to find the answer to this question. Would anybody be kind enough to help me out?

"Which Networking Device reduces the size of both collision domains and broadcast domains?"

<Options>

- hub
- layer 2 switch
- router
- bridge
- repeater


I would say it was a router but thats just a guess. By "reduce" I think it means talking about instead of having lots of collision/broadcast domains, making fewer? So I would rule out a hub and repeater because they extend cable segments.

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April 25, 2007 8:57:06 PM

The answer is layer 2 switch.
April 25, 2007 10:49:42 PM

thank you
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April 26, 2007 5:53:43 PM

I believe your answer is actually a Bridge.

A layer 2 switch has nothing to do with Domains - they only route on the same domain, so a domain collision is out of question.

Your real answer would be a Bridge. A router may also fall under this if you have mutliple choices.

I'm not a Cisco person so I did a define:collision domain on google:

Quote:
A LAN is a network which spans a limited geographical area. It is further described by the IEEE as a collision domain. A collision domain is a single CSMA/CD network which may consist of two or more Medium-Access Control (MAC) sublayers. MAC sublayers separated by a repeater are within the same collision domain. MAC sublayers separated by a bridge are within different collision domains. ...
ndc.nu/svc5.php
April 26, 2007 7:03:41 PM

Every port on the layer 2 switch is it's own collision and broadcast domain. A layer 2 switch does not route as routing is a function of layer 3.

A bridge breaks up a collision domain but does not break up the broadcast domain.

Quote:
I believe your answer is actually a Bridge.

A layer 2 switch has nothing to do with Domains - they only route on the same domain, so a domain collision is out of question.

Your real answer would be a Bridge. A router may also fall under this if you have mutliple choices.

I'm not a Cisco person so I did a define:collision domain on google:

A LAN is a network which spans a limited geographical area. It is further described by the IEEE as a collision domain. A collision domain is a single CSMA/CD network which may consist of two or more Medium-Access Control (MAC) sublayers. MAC sublayers separated by a repeater are within the same collision domain. MAC sublayers separated by a bridge are within different collision domains. ...
ndc.nu/svc5.php
April 26, 2007 11:52:43 PM

Sorry i haven't jumped on this one earlier. I am with el0 on this one.

BTW this is a question straight off the CCNA test.
April 27, 2007 12:40:12 AM

thanks for the help. so layer 2 switch then? i acutally have already submitted the module 8 CCNA and passed but i picked router. but I know for the real exam that its layer 2 switch. thanks :D 
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