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Comparing older processor to new ones

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April 27, 2007 2:46:09 PM

Can someone tell me how I would compare my existing 4 year old pentum 4 2.53 GHz with systems that are currently on the market. I want something as good or better and I was hoping that there was a chart that compared the speed of all the new processors as well as older ones.

Thanks in advance for any help with this issue.
April 27, 2007 3:45:57 PM



Nice link, but seeing as how it doesn't include the OP's chip, it's kinda useless (unless I'm completely blind).

It all depends on what you need the computer for my friend. It sounds like you might need it for a business for accounting, payroll, inventory serach, etc. Most everyone here will tell you that the new Core 2 Duo chips from Intel are the way to go nowadays but if all you're looking at doing is maybe freshening up an older PC, perhaps you should consider a simple RAMM upgrade instead. The reason is that in order to benefit from a newer CPU you're going to have to shell out for a new motherboard, and possibly a new graphics card (if the board you buy doesn't have integrated graphics that is). You'll probably also need new RAMM as well...

So tell us what your needs are and I'm sure you'll get plenty of informed opinions from which to choose.

In the mean while, here are a couple of links to try: The first is kind of esoteric:

http://compare.intel.com/pcc/default.aspx?familyid=1

but here's one that's kind of nice. Look for Pentium 2.53 Northwood in the charts to see how well it stacks up against the best of the best from about 2 years ago...

http://www.tomshardware.com/2004/12/21/the_mother_of_al...

Good luck!
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April 27, 2007 3:48:22 PM

I would say look at the THG article about processors at 2.4Ghz, then extrapolate off of that. There is a P4 on there.
a c 108 à CPUs
April 27, 2007 4:19:18 PM



Nice link, but seeing as how it doesn't include the OP's chip, it's kinda useless (unless I'm completely blind).


(2006) Athlon X2 6000+ 3dmark06- cpu: 2305
2006 C2D E6600 Conroe 3dmark06- cpu: 2136

(2004) Pentium 4 2.53 GHz 3dmark03- cpu: 646

Hyperlinks are your friends . . . :) 
a c 108 à CPUs
April 27, 2007 5:07:28 PM

If I told you about this link I couldn't maintain my intelectual superiority . . . . :p 
April 27, 2007 5:23:39 PM

Thanks to all. The pentium 4 2.53 MGHz is my home computer that I am passing on to my daughters and I want to replace it. I want to have at least as good or better performance. I do some minor video editing and CAD work.

I looked at the Tom's Hardware CPU charts page 2 and found my old system but I am not sure how I would compare that speed number with newer processors that are in systems at the major retailers such as the Celeron D 356/360 or the Intel pentium 4 631/641 or the AMD Atholon 64x2 dual core 3800+/4200+/5000+ or the Intel Core 2 Duo E4300/E6420 or the AMD turion 64 x 2 dual core TL-52 or the Pentium D 925.

Thanks,
April 27, 2007 5:27:15 PM

Quote:
Thanks to all. The pentium 4 2.53 MGHz is my home computer that I am passing on to my daughters and I want to replace it. I want to have at least as good or better performance. I do some minor video editing and CAD work.

I looked at the Tom's Hardware CPU charts page 2 and found my old system but I am not sure how I would compare that speed number with newer processors that are in systems at the major retailers such as the Celeron D 356/360 or the Intel pentium 4 631/641 or the AMD Atholon 64x2 dual core 3800+/4200+/5000+ or the Intel Core 2 Duo E4300/E6420 or the AMD turion 64 x 2 dual core TL-52 or the Pentium D 925.

Thanks,


For your needs, you should really discount the Pentium 4's and Pentium D's immediately. X2s and Core 2 Duo-based systems. Essentially, any X2 or Core 2 Duo would smash your old system into the ground in the tasks you have listed, even the lowest-end, cheapest models.

Do you plan to buy a PC, or build it?
April 27, 2007 5:29:23 PM

Look up the CPU model numbers and find out what frequency they correspond to. Wikipedia has them all. For example, just google "list of intel pentium 4 wikipedia" and you'll get, not surprisingly, the Wikipedia list of all pentium 4s and their model numbers.

In general, an AMD Athlon 64 gets about 1.7 or 1.75 times the performance of a pentium 4 per-clock (eg, if there was a 1 GHz A64 it'd be similar to a 1.7GHz P4, maybe a bit more in games and a bit less in some apps). The Core 2 gets about twice the performance of a pentium 4 per clock.

Note though that Pentium 4s and Athlon 64s are single core. Pentium D, Core 2, and Athlon 64 X2 are dual cores.
April 27, 2007 10:08:23 PM

ajfink,

I plan on buying a new PC. You do noy mention the Celeron D. Would that processor still outperform my old Pentium 4 even though it is the low end of the current systems? I was trying to go cheap but still have as good a system than the one I had.

Also you say to discount the Pentium 4's and Pentium D's but jeff_2087 says in his reply that "the Pentium D is a dual core". Can you clarify?

Thanks,
April 27, 2007 10:34:06 PM

Quote:
ajfink,

I plan on buying a new PC. You do noy mention the Celeron D. Would that processor still outperform my old Pentium 4 even though it is the low end of the current systems? I was trying to go cheap but still have as good a system than the one I had.


It would be more powerful but not by a whole lot, and the Celeron D isn't dual core so you lose that advantage. The X2's can be had for almost nothing now so if you want to go that cheap yu may as well go X2

Quote:
Also you say to discount the Pentium 4's and Pentium D's but jeff_2087 says in his reply that "the Pentium D is a dual core". Can you clarify?

Thanks,


Pentium D's are inferior to X2's and cost similar.

Core2>X2>Pentium D>A64>Pentium 4>Celeron D

EDIT:There is plenty of overlap on the above though.
!