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Filesystem Sharing: Mac/Linux/Windows

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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February 28, 2007 4:59:56 PM

I'm currently collecting parts for my dual boot workstation. While I wait, I'm trying to figure out the best approach to sharing files between my imac and the pc workstation. I want to share a FW HD enclosure (two 500gb HDs in raid0) between OSs.

First approach:

Format ext HD as Fat32. Problem is the 4gb limit and antiquated filesystem. But read/write with all OSs.

Alternative:

Format ext HD as Ext3 using Linux. Download and install Mac and Windows Ext2 drivers. No file limit. More stable? Read/write, yes.

Third approach:

Set up network, and use Samba. Haven't had time to investigate this fully, but it looks rather complicated.

Then there is Fuse and MacFuse which will allow, i think, read/write to NTFS at some point.

For those of you who share between OSs, what has been the most reliable approach to sharing files?
February 28, 2007 10:32:37 PM

If you're going the network route, I would suggets looking at NFS. It's natively supported in OS X, and easily added in WIndows through the freely available Services for Unix.

As for a local filesystem, you've pretty much summed it up. I don't have experience with the Windows EXT3 stuff, but I am told it's reasonably stable.

Also, the NTFS-3G stuff for Linux does support NTFS read/write, and I also understand this is rather stable as well. As this is a FUSE FS, it also should work with MacFUSE.

Looks like you've already done alot of the leg work here, I'd say try some stuff out with unimportant data and see what works best for you.
February 28, 2007 11:02:40 PM

Thanks for the reply.

Quote:


Also, the NTFS-3G stuff for Linux does support NTFS read/write, and I also understand this is rather stable as well. As this is a FUSE FS, it also should work with MacFUSE.


Yes, this is the most interesting option. I'm going to pursue this, but need to verify that its ok with 64-bit.

The fall back will be the NFS you mentioned.
March 2, 2007 12:00:08 AM

Great input from bmouring as always :-D


NFS or SAMBA would work

NTFS-3G does work on 64bit distros


Either way I would ext3 the drives and use NFS or SAMBA :-D

GL
March 11, 2007 7:23:09 AM

I installed NTFS-3G to get the ability to access my 250Gb storage drive I had from Windows with all my games, images, dvds music and anime on. Now I've been able to access it as Read Only, so I copied a lot of my important files onto my Ubunt drive (160Gb) so I would work with them.

Now I've got about 4.6Gb free on my 160Gb :lol:  I set the NTFS-3G Configuration Tool so that it will let me have Read & Write access to my 250Gb drive, but soon as it mounts the drive again, this happens...



I then cannot even find my 250Gb (because it failed to mount and is staying umounted.) So I reset the NTFS-3G config back to normal RO rights and everything is all cherry pie :p 

Anyone seen this error before, and how does one fix it? I followed the information in the error, but no avail yet.... :cry: 
March 11, 2007 7:30:21 AM

I have never encountered that error.

I suspect ntfs-3g probably has a valid reason to complain.

Quote:

[root@hostname ~]# ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /xp/
WARNING: Deficient FUSE kernel module detected. Some driver features are
not available (swap file on NTFS, boot from NTFS by LILO), and
unmount is not safe unless it's made sure the ntfs-3g process
naturally terminates after calling 'umount'. The safe FUSE kernel
driver is included in the official Linux kernels since version
2.6.20-rc1, or in the FUSE 2.6.0 or later software packages,
except the faulty FUSE version 2.6.2. Please see the next page
for more help: http://www.ntfs-3g.org/support.html#fuse26

[root@hostname ~]# df /xp
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdb1 200201996 25820468 174381528 13% /xp
[root@hostname ~]# mount |grep xp
/dev/sdb1 on /xp type fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other)






Quote:
I installed NTFS-3G to get the ability to access my 250Gb storage drive I had from Windows with all my games, images, dvds music and anime on. Now I've been able to access it as Read Only, so I copied a lot of my important files onto my Ubunt drive (160Gb) so I would work with them.

Now I've got about 4.6Gb free on my 160Gb :lol:  I set the NTFS-3G Configuration Tool so that it will let me have Read & Write access to my 250Gb drive, but soon as it mounts the drive again, this happens...



I then cannot even find my 250Gb (because it failed to mount and is staying umounted.) So I reset the NTFS-3G config back to normal RO rights and everything is all cherry pie :p 

Anyone seen this error before, and how does one fix it? I followed the information in the error, but no avail yet.... :cry: 
March 11, 2007 5:39:02 PM

Sounds like a classic case of the NTFS superblock showing that the filesystem was not unmounted cleanly.

If you've been trying the suggested solutions without avail, about the only additional thing I could suggest booting a Windows XP install disk, jump into the recovery console, and run a chkdsk to try to clean the filesystem to make NTFS-3g happy.

If that doesn't work, and you are adventurous, you can try using the command [code:1:0bc6857044]sudo mount -f -t ntfs-3g /dev/hdb1 /media/storage[/code:1:0bc6857044] to force the mounting. I would strongly suggest backing up important data from the drive before forcing mounting a filesystem: generally speaking the coders of the filesystem support in the VFS layer try to make sane concessions to get the filesystem to mount but it does make things a bit more hairy when some of the sanity checks are ignored.
March 11, 2007 10:38:16 PM

Quote:
I would strongly suggest backing up important data from the drive before forcing mounting a filesystem: generally speaking the coders of the filesystem support in the VFS layer try to make sane concessions to get the filesystem to mount but it does make things a bit more hairy when some of the sanity checks are ignored.


8O I might just use the XP disc -> Recovery -> chkdsk method :) 
!