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LINUX_0 HAS FAILED ME!

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Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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March 1, 2007 7:40:01 PM

:lol:  Just kidding bud!!!

In all honesty though this was one area that he wasn't familiar with though.

That area is burning a full Dual Layer Disc.

I haven't messed with this in some time so lets just assume I know nothing about burning CDs or DVDs in Linux (which isn't too far form the truth).

Here's the juice. Thanks to Mr. 0s ingenuity and my stubborn damn the man attitude, I've got an approx 8GB file I need burned to a DVD for archival purposes. This 8GB file is a dd copy of my Windows XP partition. It's an activated fresh barebones install I can use it to restore my Windows install in case I run into problems on it..

I've got this fatty sitting on my Linux partition just talking up space and I want to get it on a DVD. Need help.

Edit: Forgot to mention I'm running FC5. I want to upgrade to FC6 but not until I have this taken care of.

More about : linux failed

a b 5 Linux
March 1, 2007 8:54:55 PM

So it's a dd image. You have a couple of options, both of which should work:

1. Convert the dd image to an ISO image by running mkisofs. Burn the ISO image to DVD using growisofs.

2. Open up something like K3B and tell it to burn a dual-layer disk. This should work. I've not burned any DL DVDs, but single-layer ones work okay.
March 1, 2007 9:31:19 PM

Just pick up an old 10GB HDD and dump it on there and sit it on your desk as a paper weight till you need it 8)
Related resources
March 2, 2007 6:31:34 PM

I believe in my travels I did come across using K3B, but if IIRC it isn't installed so I'll have to install it and give it a shot.

Thanks dudes!.
a b 5 Linux
March 3, 2007 2:49:40 AM

[code:1:ffba767d5b]
yum -y install k3b
[/code:1:ffba767d5b]

and maybe you should also

[code:1:ffba767d5b]
yum update
[/code:1:ffba767d5b]

GL :-D

Quote:
I believe in my travels I did come across using K3B, but if IIRC it isn't installed so I'll have to install it and give it a shot.

Thanks dudes!.
March 5, 2007 9:24:45 PM

I already have K3b installed and it will copy to a Dual Layer DVD :D 

Unfortunately, it appears that there is a 4GB file size limit even though the disc will fit 8.5GB. Looks like I need to split the file up anyway. Hmm, how would I go about doing this??? Since it appears that I need to split the file up, I guess Dual Layer capability is a bit of a moot point now.
March 5, 2007 10:33:05 PM

Old hard drives <15Gb are usually cast a side because they don't have any real use these days with windows machines requiring so much storage and performance. The 10Gb drive I tinker with was way too slow to put anything newer then Win98 on, but it ran Ubuntu faster then Windows did :)  You'd probably find a few cheap 10-20Gb drives on Ebay for under $10. 8)

I share a lot of stuff with friends by just handing out 10-20GB HDD's because they are simple to setup, don't get scratched and you don't have to burn CD's :) 

This is one of the things I like about Linux, I can use a lot of old hardware that is otherwise useless for Windows 8)
a b 5 Linux
March 6, 2007 2:05:52 AM

This should split it into 4096MiB pieces for you

[code:1:51b539edc7]
split -b 4096m dd_image_file split_dd_image_file_
[/code:1:51b539edc7]

[code:1:51b539edc7]
man split
[/code:1:51b539edc7]

for more info

GL :-D


Quote:
I already have K3b installed and it will copy to a Dual Layer DVD :D 

Unfortunately, it appears that there is a 4GB file size limit even though the disc will fit 8.5GB. Looks like I need to split the file up anyway. Hmm, how would I go about doing this??? Since it appears that I need to split the file up, I guess Dual Layer capability is a bit of a moot point now.
March 6, 2007 10:24:12 PM

Sorry, but that makes no sense to me. Lets says for the sake of argument the file is called backup.img

Are you saying:

[code:1:55d4f1a0d6]split -b 4096m backup.img split_backup.img[/code:1:55d4f1a0d6]

I'll see what man split turns up.

Sorry. I don't mean to be anal, but I really don't want to lose or screw up this file.
a b 5 Linux
March 7, 2007 9:07:35 AM

split -b 4096m dd_image_file split_dd_image_file_


-b 4096m = split the file into 4096MB pieces

dd_image_file = the input file

split_dd_image_file_ = the filename prefix to use when creating the split files


This will produce files named:

split_dd_image_file_aa

split_dd_image_file_ab

split_dd_image_file_ac

split_dd_image_file_ad

and so on depending on how big your input file is.


To clarify dd_image_file = the input file

is only used for reading so you cannot accidentally destroy it if you use that command.

If you want to be absolutely sure nothing bad happens to the file you can do this

[code:1:78166cf571]
chown root:root dd_image_file # change ownership to root - must be root to do this

chmod a=r dd_image_file # grant only read permission to all users on this file

ls -al dd_image_file # verify the permissions and ownership are correct

-r--r--r-- 1 root root ????????? Mar 7 06:06 dd_image_file

[/code:1:78166cf571]


In my example dd_image_file = backup.img in your code

and

split_dd_image_file_ = split_backup.img in your code


GL :-D


Quote:
Sorry, but that makes no sense to me. Lets says for the sake of argument the file is called backup.img

Are you saying:

[code:1:78166cf571]split -b 4096m backup.img split_backup.img[/code:1:78166cf571]

I'll see what man split turns up.

Sorry. I don't mean to be anal, but I really don't want to lose or screw up this file.
a b 5 Linux
March 7, 2007 9:27:32 AM

Sorry to double post but my post above was getting huge.

It is also a great idea to save the md5 and sha1 sums of the original file and the split files on all of the DVDs so that you can verify the integrity of the files after you burn them to DVD.

[code:1:ae5c511cac]

# original file
md5sum dd_image_file >> md5sum
sha1sum dd_image_file >> sha1sum

# split files
md5sum split_dd_image_file_* >> md5sum
sha1sum split_dd_image_file_* >> sha1sum
[/code:1:ae5c511cac]

This will calculate the md5 and sha1 sums of all the files and append them to md5sum and sha1sum respectively which you can then burn to DVD along with the split files.

After you are done burning you would run

[code:1:ae5c511cac]
md5sum /media/dvd/split_dd_image_file_*
sha1sum /media/dvd/split_dd_image_file_*
[/code:1:ae5c511cac]

assuming /media/dvd/ is where your DVDs are mounted

The md5 and sha1 sums you calculated when the split files were still on your HDD should match the md5 and sha1 produced when you calculate the sums from each of the DVDs.

If they do match you are good to go, if they do not match then you have a bad burn or something.

GL :-D
March 7, 2007 5:02:32 PM

I think I see it now. I'll end up with roughly 7.5GB of info split up into 2 pieces. One 4GB file and one 3.6GB (approx) file that would look something like this:

backup.img.aa
backup.img.ab

Correct?

It also means I need to make sure I have another 8GB or so of free space for the additional two files which shouldn't be problem.

Then just burn both to an 8.5GB Dual Layer disc and blammo it's done.

Of course if this works, you're going to have to help me on joining the two files back together for when I need to use the backup image.
a b 5 Linux
March 7, 2007 10:29:09 PM

Yes if the prefix is backup.img.

you will get

backup.img.aa
backup.img.ab

if the prefix is backup.img
you will get

backup.imgaa
backup.imgab



To join them back together:

[code:1:0fff8b5bcb]
cat backup.img.aa > backup.img # this will write to backup.img deleting its contents if it exists and is writable

cat backup.img.ab >> backup.img # this will append the file to the end of backup.img effectively joining the files together



cat backup.img.ac >> backup.img # if you had a 3rd, 4th, etc piece you would keep appending until you ran out of pieces
[/code:1:0fff8b5bcb]

Make sure you save the md5 and sha1 sums for the original backup.img file as well as the pieces so you can verify them!

Also I would suggest burning the files to 2 or more DL-DVDs if Dual Layer works for you.

Otherwise burn multiple copies of regular 4.4GB DVDs and buy a drive or from newegg http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.asp?Order=PRI...

That way if / when your DVD media gets scratched or degrades you will have another copy.

DVDs and CDs do degrade over time. Sometimes you will lose the data in under a year even though they claim a 100 year shelf life.

GL :-D



Quote:
I think I see it now. I'll end up with roughly 7.5GB of info split up into 2 pieces. One 4GB file and one 3.6GB (approx) file that would look something like this:

backup.img.aa
backup.img.ab

Correct?

It also means I need to make sure I have another 8GB or so of free space for the additional two files which shouldn't be problem.

Then just burn both to an 8.5GB Dual Layer disc and blammo it's done.

Of course if this works, you're going to have to help me on joining the two files back together for when I need to use the backup image.
a b 5 Linux
March 9, 2007 5:34:29 PM

I must admit that I do like the old HDD idea. I've seen enough old PC's in skips over the last few months to know they are out there.

A single dual layer disc does not seem to make much sense given the 4gb file limit. You might as well just split it and burn it to two separate discs. I do wonder how you get this image back on the system though as surely you would need a single file to dd back onto the disk, either DVD Dual or DVD Single x2 give you the same problem here.

I could do with doing along similar lines for my sister and dads laptops. I'm seriously wondering if upgrading one of my old drive and getting a cheep USB caddy might be the simplest way.
March 9, 2007 9:07:53 PM

The only reason I wanted to use a DL disc was for simplicity. The file itself is 7.5GB in size so I figured I would just burn it to the DL as opposed to splitting it up. Which ended up being a moot point as I didn't know about the 4GB size limitation imposed by K3B (mkisof).

See linux_0s last message. You re-combine the 2 files into 1 when you need it. Then dd the backup file to the C: partition where my XP install presides.

The majority of my programs lie on a separate partition (more for housekeeping purposes) as do the Documents and Settings folder and the swap is on the first partition of a separate drive. So the only data I lose is the XP install itself. It comes in real handy when I feel XP is getting sluggish or if I happen to catch a nasty virus. Just pop on in to FC5, dd away and blammo I've got a barebones install of XP again.

I simply wanted a way to restore my XP install without having to re-install and activate it all the time. Sort of like a poor man's Norton Ghost. I actually trust this method far better than anything Norton makes. And yes we tried G4L but it didn't seem to want to recognize my partitions.
a b 5 Linux
March 9, 2007 9:51:28 PM

If you have another partition on the disc to put the image on then this should
negate the issue of putting the file back together. For my situation with two laptops that only have a single partions I still have a problem of where to join the two files back together.

You can use gparted to create and restore the partition image file. It might be better to use the command line though as you could then pipe through gzip and save some space with the image file.

I like the idea of full system images. A baseline with snapshots of known good stable configurations once in a while as full images would be a very nice way to protect yourself. You could always create a backup / restore script to automate the process and reduce the complexity in the future. You could place a copy of the restore one on the first disc of the backup set.

I'm sure other people must have done this all before. I'll bet a cup of tea DSL will have a package for it. It just screams to all be run from a small flash drive with a backup and burn script... Hmmm...

** heads off to bed pondering a hacking session tomorrow **
March 13, 2007 9:07:21 PM

Quote:
If you have another partition on the disc to put the image on then this should
negate the issue of putting the file back together. For my situation with two laptops that only have a single partions I still have a problem of where to join the two files back together.

I see your point and that's why I made my Windows partiton small and have everything setup to go to different partitions. 7.5Gb is plenty of room for Windows and it's basic drivers and small enough to manage on another drive or on a DVD or two. The bulk of my Programs reside elsewhere, as do the Documents and Settings folders.

Quote:
You can use gparted to create and restore the partition image file. It might be better to use the command line though as you could then pipe through gzip and save some space with the image file.

You see this is where I wish I had more time to spend on my machine these days. I really know next to nothing about Linux and you've quite lost me with that. I get one day off of the week to myself, and half of that gets spent on taking care of the errands I couldn't get done during the week. And now that the weather is getting better the other half is devoted to the bike.

Hmm, your idea gave me a thought though. A bootable DL DVD (or DVD set) that contains DSL and the backup file too. Sort of a stand alone backup. Is this kind of what you were thinking of?
a b 5 Linux
March 14, 2007 4:53:17 PM

Yes. Very much the case. I was thinking a kind of boot and restore solution. I'd love to get a system in place where once a week or so my sis could run and burn a CD of the latest changes. If she needed to restore boot of the special disc and feed in the last cd or two.

As for Gparted have a quick look here for the bootable live CD. You can also run it as an application on most any distro. Very similar to partition magic and totally GUI. I really do rate it very highly.
a b 5 Linux
March 14, 2007 5:23:34 PM

Just to add in a bit of precaution, if you are going to be working with your primary partition (with /, /etc, /bin, maybe others), it is best to do so from a LiveCD environment so that it is unmounted and inactive. I have never heard of issues coming from doing relatively simple operations on an active partition, but common sense just points to erring on the side of caution on this one.
a b 5 Linux
March 14, 2007 6:14:17 PM

I certainly agree for making the dd images. I must say that the liveCD serve as a lot of people first taste of Linux nowadays and for good reason. I should be on a referal program for Gparted at the minute.

I guess the easiest way to do it would to automate a script that ran from a bootable USB drive. A small partition for a cut down linux install and the rest of the disk for images.

My sisters machine only has a 40Gb drive and a doubt it is half full. Put a 160Gb disk in a caddy and for ~80UK you could have a very tidy automated backup solution. Personally I'd probably have a full and incremental option, dd for the full and an rsync script for the incremental.

I guess to finish it off having the option to boot a dd image would be kind of cool, icing on the cake restore image and then copy over latest incremental via rsync. It must be doable.
!