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HDTV or SDTV - DLP or LCD. That is the question!

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November 30, 2004 10:59:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Greetings:

Here's our viewing habbits. The room is only 10' X 14' and brightly
lit during the daytime. (3 windows face the south and we're in
Florida too! Blinds help but it's not dark during the day.)
Typically, 1 to 3 people sit 9-10 feet away (down the long dimension
of the room) from the current 27", 20 year old, tube set. The new
entertainment center can hold a set that's 52" wide max. (That
eliminates some 50" RPTV sets with non-removable side speakers.) We
subscribe to Comcast for analog only, Extended Basic channels. We're
not into sports or digital music, so Digital Plus tier never was
tempting for us. Both retired and usually only watch about 3-4 hours
of TV (Network, Travel, HGTV, PBS, Weather, ...) per night. Rent an
occasional DVD or tape. Am very impressed with HDTV image. (I
actually saw previews 15 years ago at work.) Comcast currently
offers: Discovery Thtr HD, ESPN HD, two iNDEMAND, local NBC HD, local
CBS HD, Fox WideScreen, plus HBO HD East, Showtime HD East, MAX HD
East & Starz! HD East. The last four are obviously premium channels
we don't subscribe to either. Current rate is $42.95. HD would add
$9.45 since we don't have the digital tier. HD install is a whopping
$49.95 . We're too far from Orlando for an antenna. Dish Systems
don't have network HD. We're stuck with Crumbcast for now!

Question is: Are we ready for HD? We'd like to experience a few HD
shows and can afford a $4000 set to replace the aging boob tube. I'm
sure more shows are coming in the next year. Are HD sets too good for
SD and are we going to want the aging 27" tube back for Standard Def
network and other frequent shows?

Then, what HDTV?: The Samsung 50" DLP-RPTV (HLP5063W) looked
tempting, but we read mixed reviews especially about reliability. I'm
not about to spend $400 more for extended warranty to cover bulbs. At
9 feet away, is 50" TOO BIG? I'm always attracted to the brighter LCD
flat screens in showrooms. Now the Sharp 37" LCD Aquos (LC-37G4U)
looks sweet considering that the room is bright during the day. The
37GD4U with built-in HD tuner is $500 more than the Sharp HD
Monitor/NTSC tuner G4U model. Do I have an advantage (monthly cost or
performance wise) by getting the model with the NTSC/ATSC tuners?
Wouldn't external ATSC tuner be cheaper (and better)? Probably never
use iNDEMAND, so I think CableCard feature would help eliminate one
interface box.

Also I don't know the difference between DVI-I and DVI-D inputs.
Which does the Comcast box need?

What say you? (It's always fun helping other people spend their
money!)
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 10:26:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Rich wrote:
>
> Then, what HDTV?: The Samsung 50" DLP-RPTV (HLP5063W) looked
> tempting, but we read mixed reviews especially about reliability. I'm
> not about to spend $400 more for extended warranty to cover bulbs. At
> 9 feet away, is 50" TOO BIG? I'm always attracted to the brighter LCD
> flat screens in showrooms. Now the Sharp 37" LCD Aquos (LC-37G4U)
> looks sweet considering that the room is bright during the day. The
> 37GD4U with built-in HD tuner is $500 more than the Sharp HD
> Monitor/NTSC tuner G4U model. Do I have an advantage (monthly cost or
> performance wise) by getting the model with the NTSC/ATSC tuners?
> Wouldn't external ATSC tuner be cheaper (and better)? Probably never
> use iNDEMAND, so I think CableCard feature would help eliminate one
> interface box.

I love my 43" Samsung DLP. I watch it from about 9 feet away in a room
that's somewhat bright in the daytime (though most viewing is done at
night). Brightness has never been an issue, but my daughter sometimes
draws the blinds when she watches a movie during the day.

I've had it for 11 months and the bulb is still going strong. Obviously
I'll have to replace it eventually, but that's equally true of DLPs and
LCDs.

I had an LCD set for about a week before I returned it for the Samsung.
The LCD had very poor contrast - it just couldn't get dark enough to
give a good black level. The DLPs are much better in this regard
(though still not perfect).

A built-in digital tuner might be a good thing, but I don't have one and
get along pretty well. I feed the set with a Philips DVD player, a
Scientific Atlanta HD cable box (DVR) from Adelphia, and a Zenith
Over-The-Air HD receiver that I bought on closeout at Circuit City.

Even adding in the cost of the antenna, I still came in well under
$4000. And it would be lower still today than it was a year ago when I
was shopping.

It's true that SD video doesn't look very good on HD sets. The higher
resolution of the HD set lets you see the artifacts that would be masked
by a standard SD television. Add to that the higher expectation than
comes from watching HD for a while, and SD can be a real disappointment.
Still, my family watches plenty of SD television on our DLP, and we
get along just fine with it.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 11:31:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Rich wrote:
>
> Greetings:
>
> Here's our viewing habbits. The room is only 10' X 14' and brightly
> lit during the daytime. (3 windows face the south and we're in
> Florida too! Blinds help but it's not dark during the day.)

I have same size TV room... 2 windows South, 1 West...

Window blinds must be closed during day to view
my Sony 34" CRT tube !!! I need drapes too!!!




> Typically, 1 to 3 people sit 9-10 feet away (down the long dimension
> of the room) from the current 27", 20 year old, tube set.

Same for me.... on 34" 16:9 Sony HD set.... KV-34HS510...

The new
> entertainment center can hold a set that's 52" wide max. (That
> eliminates some 50" RPTV sets with non-removable side speakers.)

I have a 40" wide Sony case on Sony Stand.....
I have trouble fitting 4 Speakers from a Dolby Dig 6.1 system
on either side of TV..... Left, Right, Center, & Sub Woofer..
I also need space for a stack of: Tuners (2), DVD, & AV-Receiver.

We
> subscribe to Comcast for analog only, Extended Basic channels. We're
> not into sports or digital music, so Digital Plus tier never was
> tempting for us.

Too bad, HDTV has superb 5 or 6 channel DD surround sound !!!!


Both retired and usually only watch about 3-4 hours
> of TV (Network, Travel, HGTV, PBS, Weather, ...) per night.

Except for Weather, this stuff is on HDTV....

Rent an
> occasional DVD or tape. Am very impressed with HDTV image. (I
> actually saw previews 15 years ago at work.) Comcast currently
> offers: Discovery Thtr HD, ESPN HD, two iNDEMAND, local NBC HD, local
> CBS HD, Fox WideScreen, plus HBO HD East, Showtime HD East, MAX HD
> East & Starz! HD East. The last four are obviously premium channels
> we don't subscribe to either. Current rate is $42.95. HD would add
> $9.45 since we don't have the digital tier. HD install is a whopping
> $49.95 . We're too far from Orlando for an antenna.

Hard to believe? Prove or Disprove this at Web Site:
http://www.antennaweb.org and Enter your 5 OR 9 digit ZIP Code.
THen check the Digital only TV station option...
IF tower miles is 60 miles or less, you have an OTA antenna shot !!



Dish Systems
> don't have network HD. We're stuck with Crumbcast for now!
>
> Question is: Are we ready for HD? We'd like to experience a few HD
> shows and can afford a $4000 set to replace the aging boob tube. I'm
> sure more shows are coming in the next year. Are HD sets too good for
> SD and are we going to want the aging 27" tube back for Standard Def
> network and other frequent shows?

Yes, you are ready for HDTV IF you live in an area that offers
HDTV via OTA antenna, Cable, or Satellite.....
>
> Then, what HDTV?: The Samsung 50" DLP-RPTV (HLP5063W) looked
> tempting, but we read mixed reviews especially about reliability. I'm
> not about to spend $400 more for extended warranty to cover bulbs. At
> 9 feet away, is 50" TOO BIG? I'm always attracted to the brighter LCD
> flat screens in showrooms. Now the Sharp 37" LCD Aquos (LC-37G4U)
> looks sweet considering that the room is bright during the day. The
> 37GD4U with built-in HD tuner is $500 more than the Sharp HD
> Monitor/NTSC tuner G4U model. Do I have an advantage (monthly cost or
> performance wise) by getting the model with the NTSC/ATSC tuners?
> Wouldn't external ATSC tuner be cheaper (and better)? Probably never
> use iNDEMAND, so I think CableCard feature would help eliminate one
> interface box.

Having a 50" HD RPTV on an Analog Chan in Daylight is "not good"????

To me it seems like day light viewing requires either/both
Double backed drapes or a Direct view (Sony CRT Tube) set..
THe biggest they come for HD 16:9 is 34" diagonal (40" case)..
THese Digital sets have the Best Blacks available & Superior Guts
to process both Digital Pictures superbly or Analog 4:3
Programs very well.....

Sony CRT Sets: KD-34XBR960 Has everything, top dog! ($2200)
34" KD-34HS955 Has Tuner, superb tube, No pic & Pic($1900)
KV-34HS420 No Tuner, No Pic& Pic, Good Tube ($1400)

>
> Also I don't know the difference between DVI-I and DVI-D inputs.
> Which does the Comcast box need?

One is for HDTV to a Set Top Box..
One is for Computer to a Set Top Box... Which is which ?????

>
> What say you? (It's always fun helping other people spend their
> money!)
Related resources
December 1, 2004 3:56:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> If tower miles is 60 miles or less, you have an OTA antenna shot !!

Two reasons OTA is out here: 1. My home is in a slight valley and I
can't see over the next hill (yes, there are hills in Florida!). 2.
Roof or tower antennas (TV, Shortwave or Ham) are prohibited in this
deed restricted community. They even make you put dish antennas on
the ground. Brighthouse is not licensed in this community either.
Comcast is the only game in town. Glad to hear at least one person is
happy with the Sammy DLP set.

More comments/opinions?
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 6:07:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Rich wrote:
>
> > If tower miles is 60 miles or less, you have an OTA antenna shot !!
>
> Two reasons OTA is out here: 1. My home is in a slight valley and I
> can't see over the next hill (yes, there are hills in Florida!). 2.
> Roof or tower antennas (TV, Shortwave or Ham) are prohibited in this
> deed restricted community. They even make you put dish antennas on
> the ground. Brighthouse is not licensed in this community either.
> Comcast is the only game in town. Glad to hear at least one person is
> happy with the Sammy DLP set.
>
> More comments/opinions?

Other non discussed OTA antenna options.....

You can place a Channel Master UHF 3021 4 bay bow tie($25) in a
garage
and get 40 to 50 mile HD reception if TV transmission TOwer
gets into the 1000' tower height. W/no Aluminum siding....

Antenna can go in an attic or closet IF on Tower side of home...

These are simple HD things to try IF you get your hands
on a spare OTA set top box & some RG-6 antenna cable...
using an Analog TV with STB set to 480i Output..
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 12:24:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:5959ad48.0412011256.162a111e@posting.google.com...
: > If tower miles is 60 miles or less, you have an OTA antenna
shot !!
:
: Two reasons OTA is out here: 1. My home is in a slight valley and I
: can't see over the next hill (yes, there are hills in Florida!). 2.
: Roof or tower antennas (TV, Shortwave or Ham) are prohibited in this
: deed restricted community. They even make you put dish antennas on
: the ground.

OTA broadcast Yagi's work real well when hidden in an attic.
Assuming, that is, taht you have an attic that you can put an antenna
inside. You might need an amplifier if in a fringe area.

Russ
December 2, 2004 2:56:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Rich visit http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

They cannot restrict the antennas for TV.

Jim
"Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:5959ad48.0412011256.162a111e@posting.google.com...
>> If tower miles is 60 miles or less, you have an OTA antenna shot !!
>
> Two reasons OTA is out here: 1. My home is in a slight valley and I
> can't see over the next hill (yes, there are hills in Florida!). 2.
> Roof or tower antennas (TV, Shortwave or Ham) are prohibited in this
> deed restricted community. They even make you put dish antennas on
> the ground. Brighthouse is not licensed in this community either.
> Comcast is the only game in town. Glad to hear at least one person is
> happy with the Sammy DLP set.
>
> More comments/opinions?
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 4:20:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 1-Dec-2004, "Jim" <jwhite18816NOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote:

> They cannot restrict the antennas for TV.

It might be more in keeping with the FCC regulations to say than "They
cannot PROHIBIT antennas for TV. "

Landlords and HOA do have the right under some circumstances to restrict
antenna installation and so do local authorities.

Read again the referenced document.

--
John in Sun Prairie
December 2, 2004 5:16:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I'm not a Word Smith - of course you are right - that's why I provided the
URL. They can dictate height limits more than 12 feet above the roofline.

Jim (Must be a lawyer!)

<L230j@charter.net> wrote in message news:a5urd.256$ki7.226@fe03.lga...
>
> On 1-Dec-2004, "Jim" <jwhite18816NOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>> They cannot restrict the antennas for TV.
>
> It might be more in keeping with the FCC regulations to say than "They
> cannot PROHIBIT antennas for TV. "
>
> Landlords and HOA do have the right under some circumstances to restrict
> antenna installation and so do local authorities.
>
> Read again the referenced document.
>
> --
> John in Sun Prairie
December 2, 2004 11:08:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim" <jwhite18816NOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:<PVurd.5704$u81.2778@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>...
> I'm not a Word Smith - of course you are right - that's why I provided the
> URL. They can dictate height limits more than 12 feet above the roofline.

I'm not about to go through the hassle of arguing with the Community
Development District over federal law. Besides the Orlando
transmitters are 65 miles from me and I have to look through a large
city to "see" them and the local appliance dealers all say NTSC and
ATSC are not reachable from here. I don't mind the $9.45 monthly
charge. Can we get back to which set would be better for my viewing
conditions and habits? I'd like more input from the more experienced
videophiles. Thanks...
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 9:38:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:5959ad48.0411301959.1a14fe1e@posting.google.com...
: Greetings:
:
: Here's our viewing habbits. The room is only 10' X 14' and brightly
: lit during the daytime. (3 windows face the south and we're in
: Florida too! Blinds help but it's not dark during the day.)

LCD's and Plasma's don't reflect as bad as RPTV's and CRT's.

: Typically, 1 to 3 people sit 9-10 feet away (down the long dimension
: of the room) from the current 27", 20 year old, tube set. The new
: entertainment center can hold a set that's 52" wide max. (That
: eliminates some 50" RPTV sets with non-removable side speakers.) We
: subscribe to Comcast for analog only, Extended Basic channels.
We're
: not into sports or digital music,

You might investigate the music. They offer much more than what you
get over the radio. Big Band, very early Rock-N-Roll and early
country. Not just the modern junk that these kids listen to now.
(I'm an old f*art also.)

so Digital Plus tier never was
: tempting for us. Both retired and usually only watch about 3-4
hours
: of TV (Network,

Network is where HDTV shines. Lost, Law and Order, CSI just to name a
few are all in HD.

:Travel, HGTV, PBS, Weather, ...) per night. Rent an
: occasional DVD or tape. Am very impressed with HDTV image. (I
: actually saw previews 15 years ago at work.) Comcast currently
: offers: Discovery Thtr HD, ESPN HD, two iNDEMAND, local NBC HD,
local
: CBS HD, Fox WideScreen, plus HBO HD East, Showtime HD East, MAX HD
: East & Starz! HD East. The last four are obviously premium channels
: we don't subscribe to either. Current rate is $42.95. HD would add
: $9.45 since we don't have the digital tier. HD install is a
whopping
: $49.95 . We're too far from Orlando for an antenna. Dish Systems
: don't have network HD. We're stuck with Crumbcast for now!
:
: Question is: Are we ready for HD?

Yes, if you watch network tv then you're ready for HD

:We'd like to experience a few HD
: shows and can afford a $4000 set to replace the aging boob tube.
I'm
: sure more shows are coming in the next year. Are HD sets too good
for
: SD and are we going to want the aging 27" tube back for Standard Def
: network and other frequent shows?
:
: Then, what HDTV?:

My advice is to go to Sears, Best Buy, Circuit City, Tweeters,
Ultimate Electronics, and other local chains that you might have and
look, look, look. Shop until you find what you think you like best.
It's a personal decision.

I went with an LCD direct view because of the lack of reflections from
the window. My RPTV had a real severe reflection issue in my living
room, but other people might not have that problem.

:The Samsung 50" DLP-RPTV (HLP5063W) looked
: tempting, but we read mixed reviews especially about reliability.
I'm
: not about to spend $400 more for extended warranty to cover bulbs.

I thought the same until I bought a Bosh dishwasher from Sears about 3
years ago. Last year (warranty out) it decides to quit. Solid state
board went out. Price $700.00 plus labor. Warranty was $300.00. New
dishwasher $800.00. What did I do? ... Well, the service guy was
really nice, and sold us the warranty, and told us to wait a week. We
waited for the week and called back, and we got it fixed under the
warranty. Saved us much more than the warranty would have cost in the
first place.

: At
: 9 feet away, is 50" TOO BIG?

Some say no, I say yes. I don't set close to a movie theater screen
because it gives me headaches. I have a 52" 4:3 in my small living
room, It's just too big (for me that is). I'll replace with, at the
most a 42" 16:9.

My HD LCD went into the bedroom, it's a 27", and it's just a perfect
size for the bedroom.

: I'm always attracted to the brighter LCD
: flat screens in showrooms.

Me too. Plus LCD's don't burn in. I've had a 15" LCD computer
monitor now for 2 years. Never turned it off, except for vacations,
and it's 90% of the time on the windows desktop, and it's never burned
in.

:Now the Sharp 37" LCD Aquos (LC-37G4U)
: looks sweet considering that the room is bright during the day. The
: 37GD4U with built-in HD tuner is $500 more than the Sharp HD
: Monitor/NTSC tuner G4U model.

Consider the one with the built in tuner and one with a cable card.
Even if you don't go over-the-air, you can still use the tuner and the
cable card with Comcast and no set top box from them.
advantage: no set top box, use the one remote for the tv to controll
everything.
disadvantage: not able to (at this time with 1 way cable cards)
receive PPV's, or other "On-Demand" programing.

: Do I have an advantage (monthly cost or
: performance wise) by getting the model with the NTSC/ATSC tuners?
: Wouldn't external ATSC tuner be cheaper (and better)? Probably
never
: use iNDEMAND, so I think CableCard feature would help eliminate one
: interface box.
:
: Also I don't know the difference between DVI-I and DVI-D inputs.
: Which does the Comcast box need?

Get the cable card and that's a mute point except for DVD player
hookup
:
: What say you? (It's always fun helping other people spend their
: money!)
:

Russ
December 4, 2004 12:18:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

RUSS WROTE:
> Network is where HDTV shines. Lost, Law and Order, CSI just to name a few are all in HD.
> My advice is to go to Sears, Best Buy, Circuit City, Tweeters,
> Ultimate Electronics, and other local chains that you might have and
> look, look, look. Shop until you find what you think you like best.
> It's a personal decision.
> Russ

Thanks Russ, that's just the type of input from users that I was
looking for. I've seen every set in the stores, none were showing
true HDTV unfortunately. Yet the LCD direct view sets always looked
more vibrant to me. I've never been too impressed with plasma. No
one was willing to switch to a local SD channel either. Guess because
it doesn't help sell the high end sets like HD Plasma or LCD.
Regards, Rich...
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 6:30:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

There is a relatively small appliance outlet here in Austin that only uses
an OTA antenna to display its Sony HDTV sets. I suppose you could always
invest in a small unpowered HD OTA antenna. Make sure it has a 75ohm cable
ready to screw onto the back of a TV. Find a TV you like, ask them to let
you attach the cable from your antenna to the TV set's "antenna" input. Bet
it would be the first time they heard that one!

mack
austin


"Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:5959ad48.0412032118.6c7e8f16@posting.google.com...
> RUSS WROTE:
> > Network is where HDTV shines. Lost, Law and Order, CSI just to name a
few are all in HD.
> > My advice is to go to Sears, Best Buy, Circuit City, Tweeters,
> > Ultimate Electronics, and other local chains that you might have and
> > look, look, look. Shop until you find what you think you like best.
> > It's a personal decision.
> > Russ
>
> Thanks Russ, that's just the type of input from users that I was
> looking for. I've seen every set in the stores, none were showing
> true HDTV unfortunately. Yet the LCD direct view sets always looked
> more vibrant to me. I've never been too impressed with plasma. No
> one was willing to switch to a local SD channel either. Guess because
> it doesn't help sell the high end sets like HD Plasma or LCD.
> Regards, Rich...
Anonymous
December 5, 2004 9:13:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:5959ad48.0412020808.5244d8a1@posting.google.com...
> "Jim" <jwhite18816NOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:<PVurd.5704$u81.2778@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>...
> > I'm not a Word Smith - of course you are right - that's why I provided
the
> > URL. They can dictate height limits more than 12 feet above the
roofline.
>
> I'm not about to go through the hassle of arguing with the Community
> Development District over federal law. Besides the Orlando
> transmitters are 65 miles from me and I have to look through a large
> city to "see" them and the local appliance dealers all say NTSC and
> ATSC are not reachable from here. I don't mind the $9.45 monthly
> charge. Can we get back to which set would be better for my viewing
> conditions and habits? I'd like more input from the more experienced
> videophiles. Thanks

I have a 50 inch RCA DLP set for 13 months. Before I got it I NEVER watched
the prime time TV shows. Now I am amazed by the picture quality of the
evening HDTV shows and watch one or 2 each night that are in HDTV. The PBS
HDTV feed on Ku band satellite is also amazing quality and many very
interesting shows.

The DLP TV set is very bright, has no burn in problems, no convergence
errors and other problems associated with CRT TV sets. It weighs about 85
pounds and has had no problems in the 13 months, so far. It is a 1 chip
device with a color wheel, and so in dark scenes if you move your eyes you
can sometimes see the color "rainbow" due to the color wheel, I rarely
notice it any more and think it is a easy compromise to eliminate the color
errors on the edges of picture detail caused by mis-convergence of the 3
colors from CRT or LCD TV sets.

I think the new JVC D-ILA 3 chip sets look very good, and would strongly
recommend you check out much more info at the AVSforums, you can learn about
all the HDTV sets there. http://www.avsforum.com/

I have been designing video "stuff' for 40 years and my HDTV set is the best
video I have ever seen. Playing DVD disks in my computer and using a DVI
digital connector to the DLP TV set and using software to up-convert the DVD
to HDTV resolution with additional software processing gives the best DVD
playback I have seen anywhere, looks very close to HDTV image, and I would
never have thought this was possible. Using Zoom player and FFDshow to
process the DVD playback more info on AVSforums.

I get ATSC HDTV over the air about 55 miles away through hilly Kentucky,
have a 1 meter Ku dish for the PBS HDTV feeds on satellite, and a 12 foot
C-band dish for the HDTV feeds for premium movie channels and Discovery HD.

Mike T
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 6:38:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <TcIsd.4141749$yk.625920@news.easynews.com>,
"Mike T" <mtallent@u$-i$p.net> writes:
>
> "Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:5959ad48.0412020808.5244d8a1@posting.google.com...
>> "Jim" <jwhite18816NOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:<PVurd.5704$u81.2778@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>...
>> > I'm not a Word Smith - of course you are right - that's why I provided
> the
>> > URL. They can dictate height limits more than 12 feet above the
> roofline.
>>
>> I'm not about to go through the hassle of arguing with the Community
>> Development District over federal law. Besides the Orlando
>> transmitters are 65 miles from me and I have to look through a large
>> city to "see" them and the local appliance dealers all say NTSC and
>> ATSC are not reachable from here. I don't mind the $9.45 monthly
>> charge. Can we get back to which set would be better for my viewing
>> conditions and habits? I'd like more input from the more experienced
>> videophiles. Thanks
>
> I have a 50 inch RCA DLP set for 13 months. Before I got it I NEVER watched
> the prime time TV shows. Now I am amazed by the picture quality of the
> evening HDTV shows and watch one or 2 each night that are in HDTV. The PBS
> HDTV feed on Ku band satellite is also amazing quality and many very
> interesting shows.
>
> The DLP TV set is very bright, has no burn in problems, no convergence
> errors and other problems associated with CRT TV sets. It weighs about 85
> pounds and has had no problems in the 13 months, so far. It is a 1 chip
> device with a color wheel, and so in dark scenes if you move your eyes you
> can sometimes see the color "rainbow" due to the color wheel, I rarely
> notice it any more and think it is a easy compromise to eliminate the color
> errors on the edges of picture detail caused by mis-convergence of the 3
> colors from CRT or LCD TV sets.
>
When doing a lab comparison between LCD and DLP, I found that the LCD
has too many lag problems to provide a fully enjoyable picture for
moving images. I have seldom seen a 'rainbow', but very often see the
lag from a Sony (Wega) LCD.

Initially, the Sony looked better (for static images), and they did a fairly
good job of providing a subjectively VERY VERY sharp HDTV image. Initially,
it appeared to be clearer than DLP. When viewing the image for more than
just a short time, then the artifacts from the Sony occurred often enough
and were serious enough to make the LCD Wega a non-contender. I do have
some minor criticism of the DLP also, but much less significant.

Note that I am not a fully unbiased observer, but would never
represent my position based upon dishonest information or even spin.

John
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 10:55:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"John S. Dyson" <toor@iquest.net> wrote in message
news:cp0k72$9pq$2@news.iquest.net...
> In article <TcIsd.4141749$yk.625920@news.easynews.com>,
> "Mike T" <mtallent@u$-i$p.net> writes:
> >
> > "Rich" <TheMagicSquare@comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:5959ad48.0412020808.5244d8a1@posting.google.com...
> >> "Jim" <jwhite18816NOSPAM@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> > news:<PVurd.5704$u81.2778@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>...
> >> > I'm not a Word Smith - of course you are right - that's why I
provided
> > the
> >> > URL. They can dictate height limits more than 12 feet above the
> > roofline.
> >>
> >> I'm not about to go through the hassle of arguing with the Community
> >> Development District over federal law. Besides the Orlando
> >> transmitters are 65 miles from me and I have to look through a large
> >> city to "see" them and the local appliance dealers all say NTSC and
> >> ATSC are not reachable from here. I don't mind the $9.45 monthly
> >> charge. Can we get back to which set would be better for my viewing
> >> conditions and habits? I'd like more input from the more experienced
> >> videophiles. Thanks
> >
> > I have a 50 inch RCA DLP set for 13 months. Before I got it I NEVER
watched
> > the prime time TV shows. Now I am amazed by the picture quality of the
> > evening HDTV shows and watch one or 2 each night that are in HDTV. The
PBS
> > HDTV feed on Ku band satellite is also amazing quality and many very
> > interesting shows.
> >
> > The DLP TV set is very bright, has no burn in problems, no convergence
> > errors and other problems associated with CRT TV sets. It weighs about
85
> > pounds and has had no problems in the 13 months, so far. It is a 1 chip
> > device with a color wheel, and so in dark scenes if you move your eyes
you
> > can sometimes see the color "rainbow" due to the color wheel, I rarely
> > notice it any more and think it is a easy compromise to eliminate the
color
> > errors on the edges of picture detail caused by mis-convergence of the 3
> > colors from CRT or LCD TV sets.
> >
> When doing a lab comparison between LCD and DLP, I found that the LCD
> has too many lag problems to provide a fully enjoyable picture for
> moving images. I have seldom seen a 'rainbow', but very often see the
> lag from a Sony (Wega) LCD.
>
> Initially, the Sony looked better (for static images), and they did a
fairly
> good job of providing a subjectively VERY VERY sharp HDTV image.
Initially,
> it appeared to be clearer than DLP. When viewing the image for more than
> just a short time, then the artifacts from the Sony occurred often enough
> and were serious enough to make the LCD Wega a non-contender. I do have
> some minor criticism of the DLP also, but much less significant.
>
> Note that I am not a fully unbiased observer, but would never
> represent my position based upon dishonest information or even spin.
>
> John
>

Have you looked at the new JVC D-ILA set. They look pretty good to me,
although I have not checked for the lag problem yet. I know there have been
some problems reported on AVSforum about color purity and having to be
replaced, but the set looks very good and has 3 chips so no color wheel. I
did see some color fringing on white text, but it may also be chromatic
aberation in the optics or chip registration errors, but was not visable
after about 5 feet.

Mike T
Anonymous
December 20, 2004 7:46:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 3 Dec 2004 21:18:09 -0800, TheMagicSquare@comcast.net (Rich) wrote:


>Thanks Russ, that's just the type of input from users that I was
>looking for. I've seen every set in the stores, none were showing
>true HDTV unfortunately. Yet the LCD direct view sets always looked
>more vibrant to me.

Me too... then I bought one and learned about black crush
!