Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

2 internet connections, 2 routers, help!

Last response: in Networking
Share
May 4, 2007 6:06:44 PM

OK, here's my scenario:

At the company where I work, we currently have everyone on a partial T1 line, provided by MCI with a Siemens router. We are now adding a full T1 line from AT&T on a Cisco 1841 router. My issue is this: management wants me to put all the sales people on the partial T1 line, and everyone else on the full T1 line. It's all fine and dandy, but how can I have both isolated networks access the file server and share the printers? Is there anyway to connect the two together? Or should I do something different?

Please help! Thank you so much in advance! :D 

PS - I'm locked out of the Cisco router, only AT&T can get in, and i don't know about the Siemens router.
May 4, 2007 8:56:03 PM

Do you have a router that you have access to? I would just build two separate subnetworks, put all the sales people in one subnetwork and point their default route to the siemens router. I would put everyone else in the other subnetwork with the AT&T router and point their default to the AT&T router. Then tie both networks together with the router that you have access to. Since you don't have access to the two routers, you would need to create a route on the workstations pointing to the other subnetwork through the third router.

The ideal way to do this is to put both of your T1s on one router, create a policy map and send the sales people out the partial T1 and everyone else out the full T1... but to make it easier you would still have to subnetwork out the sales people.
May 4, 2007 8:56:29 PM

Do you have a router that you have access to? I would just build two separate subnetworks, put all the sales people in one subnetwork and point their default route to the siemens router. I would put everyone else in the other subnetwork with the AT&T router and point their default to the AT&T router. Then tie both networks together with the router that you have access to. Since you don't have access to the two routers, you would need to create a route on the workstations pointing to the other subnetwork through the third router.

The ideal way to do this is to put both of your T1s on one router, create a policy map and send the sales people out the partial T1 and everyone else out the full T1... but to make it easier you would still have to subnetwork out the sales people.
Related resources
May 4, 2007 10:47:25 PM

thanks for the explanation, el0him. it all makes perfect sense, but could you walk me through it, please? this is what i get:

have both T1 routers feed into another router. change the subnet masks on the computers, so the 9 sales comps have one, and remaining 15 nodes another. get ahold of a router, and route sales out of the partial, everyone else out the full T1.

my question is:
can you go into your explanation a little more in depth? right now, everyone either gets their IP automatically via DCHP, or they have something simple assigned (IP 192.168.1.100, subnet 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.1.1).
what subnet mask should i assign?

and more importantly, is there a solution that doesn't involve purchasing a new router? purchasing more equipment is kindof my last option. if i must purchase a router, which router do you recommend?
May 6, 2007 12:15:03 PM

Actually it would be easier to use 2 VLANs to split the traffic. As long as any servers are on a trunk port which allows both VLANs that wouldn't be an issue. So put the sales people in VLAN 2 and all other staff in VLAN 3. Of course, if you hav a L3 router and not a L3 switch that won't work, but you can also use vrf's to differentiate the two.

How are the workers connected to that intermediate router? Via a single switch or do you use 2 switches? Or are they connected directly to the intermediate router?

Using VLANs or vrf's would save you the trouble of renumbering your IP plan, and would also save you the trouble of using PBR (Policy Based Routing).
May 6, 2007 4:10:57 PM

right now there is no intermediate router. as of now, everyone is connected to one of two 24-port switches that feed into the partial T1 router.

::grrrr::

this is so complicated....

can anybody reccomend an inexpensive L3 switch that'll work for me?
May 8, 2007 5:20:55 PM

A true L3 switch is not possible for a low price. All are managed by default, and your'e looking at Cisco, Juniper and the like for a L3 switch.

As you have two 24-port switches it would be easy to connect everything. Set up VLAN 2 for one group of employees, VLAN 3 for the other, and connect the switches to each other with a trunk. Set up ISP A in one VLAN and ISP b in teh second. Make sure the ports between the switches and to any servers are trunk ports and allow VLAN2 and VLAN3. All employees in VLAN2 will use ISP A and all in VLAN3 will use ISP B.
!