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1080p

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Anonymous
December 5, 2004 11:25:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

So far this seems only to be available in two rather large LCD units,
one from Sharp (45") and the other from Samsung (46"). However, that
seems to be the way the world is going over the next couple of years.

I am looking for something on the order of 32" since that will give me
about the same vertical height as my present 4:3 TV. Is there any news,
or even rumors, of 1080p units being available in this size in the next
18-24 months?

--
Robert B. Peirce, Venetia, PA 724-941-6883
bob AT peirce-family.com [Mac]
rbp AT cooksonpeirce.com [Office]

More about : 1080p

Anonymous
December 5, 2004 11:25:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Robert Peirce wrote:
> So far this seems only to be available in two rather large LCD units,
> one from Sharp (45") and the other from Samsung (46"). However, that
> seems to be the way the world is going over the next couple of years.
>
> I am looking for something on the order of 32" since that will give me
> about the same vertical height as my present 4:3 TV. Is there any news,
> or even rumors, of 1080p units being available in this size in the next
> 18-24 months?

I have not read any rumors, but I expect you will see 32" to 40" size
range direct view LCD TVs at 1920x1080 resolution in the next several
years for marketing purposes & dual PC/TV use. Not likely to happen with
direct view CRTs in this size, even if it was not a major technical
challenge, given the cost and the fact that the bigger and higher end
CRT TVs are going to disappear from the market over the next few years.

However, if you are using a 32" 16:9 TV at, say a typical viewing
distance of 8", the benefits of going from 1366x768 or 1280x720 to
1920x1080 is minimal. The rule of thumb is that the limit of the angular
resolution of the human eye is 1 arc minute. So you want the pixels of
an ideal screen to be smaller than that from your viewing distance, but
going much below, say, 45 arc seconds in angular spacing is not going to
add anything.

Math time: width of a 32" 16:9 TV = 27.9". Viewing Distance = 8' = 96".
One degree = 60 arc minutes.

Angular field of view = arctan(27.9" / 96") = 16.2 degrees = 972 arc
minutes!

Even going down to a viewing distance of 6', the angular horizontal
field of view for a 32" 16:9 set is 1270 arc minutes. So the current
resolution of the 32" to 37" direct view LCDs is already adequate in
terms of resolution unless you sit very close to the TV.

This is a factor all those people bashing 720p in the "why does 720p
exist" thread appear to ignorant of (along with other things). 1080i or
1080p resolution only really add much when you get into big screens, say
45" and up, or when the apparent screen size get bigger than 21.3
degrees (1280 pixels/60 arc minutes) from your sitting position. It is
somewhat surprising that we even adopted 1080i as a broadcast standard
given that someone could have argued back in the mid-90s that only rich
people or sports nuts with big screen TVs would benefit and not your
mythical "average" consumer.

Hope this helps more than it confuses.

Alan Figgatt
December 5, 2004 11:25:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> So far this seems only to be available in two rather large LCD units,
> one from Sharp (45") and the other from Samsung (46"). However, that
> seems to be the way the world is going over the next couple of years.
>
> I am looking for something on the order of 32" since that will give me
> about the same vertical height as my present 4:3 TV. Is there any news,
> or even rumors, of 1080p units being available in this size in the next
> 18-24 months?

I've looked, and drooled, over those same 1080p units as well.

I also have the same questions as you do about 1080p, what is the immediete
future for it. Isn't HD-DVD and/or BluRay supposed to be embracing 1080p?
Are there any D-VHS players right now that put out 1080p? The only thing
I've seen thats capable of putting out 1080p is one of the professional HDTV
camera units used by the networks, which are well outside my budget! :^)

I'm with ya though. Lets reduce some of the HD chaos (and the threads here
about 720p vs 1080i) and head full fledged towards 1080p!
Related resources
December 7, 2004 7:18:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Eric" <none@nospam.not> wrote in message
news:10r6uobtecnusd5@corp.supernews.com...
>> So far this seems only to be available in two rather large LCD units,
>> one from Sharp (45") and the other from Samsung (46"). However, that
>> seems to be the way the world is going over the next couple of years.
>>
>> I am looking for something on the order of 32" since that will give me
>> about the same vertical height as my present 4:3 TV. Is there any news,
>> or even rumors, of 1080p units being available in this size in the next
>> 18-24 months?
>
> I've looked, and drooled, over those same 1080p units as well.
>
> I also have the same questions as you do about 1080p, what is the
> immediete
> future for it. Isn't HD-DVD and/or BluRay supposed to be embracing 1080p?
> Are there any D-VHS players right now that put out 1080p? The only thing
> I've seen thats capable of putting out 1080p is one of the professional
> HDTV
> camera units used by the networks, which are well outside my budget! :^)
>
> I'm with ya though. Lets reduce some of the HD chaos (and the threads
> here
> about 720p vs 1080i) and head full fledged towards 1080p!
>
Microsoft Media Player does 1080p and there are a few DVD's with this
feature already.

Richard.
>
December 8, 2004 10:36:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> Microsoft Media Player does 1080p and there are a few DVD's with this
> feature already.

I was unaware that WMP did 1080p. Thats pretty cool. Read some stuff about
how some folks were throwing computers into the HD mix for a temporary "HD
media solution". I'm coming up on looking for a new video card anyway, I
may just add HD to the list of features. Not familiar with whatever format
WMP uses to store HD on regular DVD's. (Going to google that later.) Since
the computer does all the video processing, I'm guessing it really doesn't
matter what the physical medium is -- as long as it's in a format that the
computer can process? How much (time wise) HD (say, 1080i) can a standard
DVD hold. Guessing about 15 minutes?
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 5:26:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 19:36:37 -0500, "Eric" <none@nospam.not> wrote:

>How much (time wise) HD (say, 1080i) can a standard
>DVD hold. Guessing about 15 minutes?

I've got a copy of The Fifth Element in 720p WMV9 with AC-3 5.1 audio
that fits on one DVD-R.

Extrapolating, I don't think it would be that tough to fit the same
thing in 1080p (or maybe 1440 x 1080, like MS's own offerings?) on a
dual-layer DVD.
!