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620W Will Not Be Enough Power?

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  • Power Supplies
  • HD
  • Components
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Last response: in Components
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May 3, 2007 1:09:55 AM

So I read on Fudzilla.com, and I quote, "ATI recommends that you get a 750 Watt or better power supply with two 2x3pin PCIe connectors. Otherwise your Radeon HD 2900XT with 512 GDDR3 memory won't even work." Could this be true? For a single card system? 8O S*$#!!!! :twisted: :evil: 

So who wants to buy my brand new, still in the box, never been used because I am waiting for the HD 2900 XT release, Corsair HX620W PSU?!? Anyone? Anyone? Buhler?

I just read an article somewhere that showed wazoo, dual core, dual card (I think 8800's of some make) blinky light, 2-3 HD system with a 5-600 watt PSU to show you don't need 1,000,000 jigawatts.

I need some insight, information, knowledge. Perhaps our very knowledgable friend mpilchfamily can talk me off the ledge...

More about : 620w power

May 3, 2007 1:47:30 AM

Its also rumored that it will only need a pair of 6pin connectors to work, but a 8pin is recommended if overclocking. In other words its really close to 6pins but we had to put the 8 pin on there just in case.
May 3, 2007 1:54:34 AM

For sure about future upgrade ability, but hopefully that trend will start reversing itself soon enough .
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May 3, 2007 3:20:58 AM

so, my PSU has a combined 38 Amps on the 12v rails. will this be enough?
May 3, 2007 5:32:31 AM

I bought the Corsair 620 based on solid reviews. In your opinion, mpilchfamily, taking the HD 2900 XT out of the picture for now, was this a good PSU to buy? How can I determine what my amperage ratings, etc. are? (I know you must have a sticky for this...)

Dufus
May 3, 2007 5:33:19 AM

And should I hang on to this PSU?

D
May 3, 2007 6:30:47 AM

From the Corsair website:

"Triple 12V Rails provide independent reliable power to the CPU, video card and other components with a combined rating of 50A (40A on 520W) maximum! Advanced circuitry design that automatically enables power sharing between the triple +12V rails in an event of overload on any single +12V rail. Powerful +5Vsb rail with 3A rating."

Sound good? Capable? Sufficient?
May 3, 2007 2:01:14 PM

50A is more than sufficient for any single card setup including the R600s.
May 3, 2007 4:54:31 PM

Quote:
From the Corsair website:

"Triple 12V Rails provide independent reliable power to the CPU, video card and other components with a combined rating of 50A (40A on 520W) maximum! Advanced circuitry design that automatically enables power sharing between the triple +12V rails in an event of overload on any single +12V rail. Powerful +5Vsb rail with 3A rating."

Sound good? Capable? Sufficient?


I have had this PSU for almost 2 months and could not be happier. The modular cables are flat and IMO a breeze to work with. It replaced a Themaltake 680W that had a fan die in it. I didn't have time to run out, buy a fan and repair it as I was headed for a LAN party, so I grabbed this PSU on the way.

Take the 3 12v rail part with a grain of salt. It has 2 physical rails and what they call a "virtual rail". Not to much to fuss about as most PSU vendors do this. Still an awesome PSU. I am including a link below about PSU testing methods used by most "review sites. It's a good read and the guy who wrote it knows a great deal about the components that go into a PSU.


http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/410
May 3, 2007 10:40:26 PM

Thanks for the link, it has help to grow my understanding of PSUs. :) 

What kind of card/system are you running with your 620W unit?

D
May 3, 2007 11:47:33 PM

Quote:
How do you know the total Amperage of the combined +12v rails?

First of all adding the amerage rating of the rails is not how you get the total amperage. Secondly the Label on Apeiva PSUs do not offer the information needed to find the total amperage. Third, Apevia is amoung, if not the worst PSUs you can buy. They have a bad habbit of not lasting very long and destroying systems when they die. With those PSUs you are spending about $90 for a pile of junk. About $40 of that goes into all the little flashy addons that make the PSU look cool. So you are only paying about $50 for a 600W unit. That means they are using some very cheap parts. Not a good idea for running a high end system. You will have too much invested in your system to risk it with such a cheap unit.

It will be in your best intrest if you read the PSU 101 & 102 sticky at the top of this section.


i know now that apevia is a bad brand but didn't when i bought it. i made the mistake of not reading and learning enough about PSU's and it's a mistake i have to live with because, unfortunately, i can't afford to buy a new PSU, and the best i can do is hope it doesn't take out other components when it inevitably does die. :oops:  :cry: 

moving on, how do i find the total amperage if adding 20 and 18 is not correct? :?:

on a side note, in case i should find myself able to afford a good PSU sometime soon, what brands or models would you recommend, mpilchfamily?

thanks in advance.
a b ) Power supply
May 4, 2007 12:45:55 AM

While not all manufacturers list them, look for the maximum wattage across all +12v rails. You may need to do some simple math if they say something like, "520 watts maximum +3.3v, +5v, +12v1, +12v2" and "160 watts maximum +3.3v, +5v. In a case like this, you can simply subtract 160 watts from 520 watts and come up with 360 watts for just the +12v rails. The idea is to get just the wattages across the +12v rail(s). Divide that number (watts) by 12 (volts) and you get the maximum amps across the +12v rail(s).

In the example above, we're looking at 30 amps maximum combined across the +12v Rails (360/12=30). All this while the amperage across the +12v rails is "rated" at 17A or something close.

*note - the above is just an example. This does not reflect the capability of any single power supply that I'm aware if. I pulled the numbers at random.

-Wolf sends

Edit: Brands that I hear commonly preferred are FSP (Fortran Source), Seasonic, Antec, and PC Power and Cooling. That's just what I've heard.
May 4, 2007 12:57:58 AM

Your Corsair 620W will be just fine, never fear. Use your brain to weed out unrealistic info :) 
May 4, 2007 1:18:02 AM

Quote:
...160 watts maximum +3.3v, +5v. In a case like this, you can simply subtract 160 watts from 520 watts and come up with 360 watts for just the +12v rails.

listen to mythos, if I may expand on his concept... there is the scenario where you are not drawing the full 160w (or whatever the +3.3/+5 max is) so you have all that leftover power from the transformer/caps/etc available that can go directly to the +12v rectifiers if needed. Waste not, want not :wink:

Hence, if you're running a server that has 8 x ECC dimms and a dozen SCSI 15k hdd's then you are probably using a whole lot more of the +3.3v/+5v rail than a typical game rig.
May 4, 2007 2:30:26 AM

Quote:
i know now that apevia is a bad brand

You need to read this - Young Year YP-AB review @ hardwaresecrets, apevia uses youngyear as their primary OEM. I actually had that unit, it ran for 18 months 24x7 then died. It's a poor quality unit, but it does have protective circuitry.

Quote:
how do i find the total amperage if adding 20 and 18 is not correct? :?:

Well the manufacturer specs say "nominal" power on the +12v1=14A, and +12v2=16A so it *should* be 30A... But after reading the hardwaresecrets article, would you believe it?

Quote:
on a side note, in case i should find myself able to afford a good PSU sometime soon, what brands or models would you recommend

Well that apevia goes for $90/$98 shipped @ newegg I would have gotten the Corsair CMPSU-520HX, still the best deal out there at buy.com for $100 w/free shipping and a $20 MIR as a bonus.
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