Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

SATA II hard drive in a SATA I motherboard?

Last response: in Storage
Share
May 3, 2007 7:53:39 PM

Can a motherboard that only supports sata I use a hard drive that is sata II? If so, I heard something about changing the jumpers?

WD800JD in an ASUS A8N5X motherboard.
May 3, 2007 8:32:10 PM

There is no such thing as a "SATA II" device. There is 1.5gb/s ("SATA 150") and 3gpb/s ("SATA 300") is supposed to be backwards compatible.
http://www.sata-io.org/namingguidelines.asp
(marketing is not your friend)

The SATA spec has no definitions for jumpers. Most SATA drives don't have any jumpers on them. All 3gb/s SATA devices are supposed to auto-negotiate down to 1.5gb/s

It should work fine.

Also, try a searching first next time ;) 
May 3, 2007 9:52:57 PM

Just received my two WD800JD hard drives. On the hard drive it says: Use jumper pins 5 and 6 to enable sata 150mbs only operation.
Related resources
May 3, 2007 10:05:32 PM

well if their speed-negotiation algorithm doesn't work use their jumper. I'd try it without the jumper first. At least on a SATA drive you don't have to worry about corrupting your file system on the drive if it doesn't work ;) 
May 4, 2007 12:29:44 AM

Yes. It will.

I ahve done this on 50+ PC's.

The SATA 2 3Gbps Hard drive will only have a small pipeline to transfer data , so it will be forced to work as a 1.5 Gbps SAT1 drive.

Btw, there is a jumper to set a 3Gbps drive to 1.5 Gbps on the hard drive
May 4, 2007 12:56:40 AM

In most cases the jumper is not necessary, I've used those drives on at least 3 different SATA150 controllers without using the jumper.
May 4, 2007 1:24:34 AM

Quote:
Yes. It will.

I ahve done this on 50+ PC's.

The SATA 2 3Gbps Hard drive will only have a small pipeline to transfer data , so it will be forced to work as a 1.5 Gbps SAT1 drive.

Btw, there is a jumper to set a 3Gbps drive to 1.5 Gbps on the hard drive


...I will destroy you.

You really ought to read at least the first few posts of a thread before you respond. If you had you would know that

1. There's no such thing as a "SATA II" or "SATA2" device. It doesn't mean anything if you say a controller or a drive is "SATA II". And it really doesn't mean that it supports 3gb/s. It was never intended to be device classification. The SATA II specification contains many, MANY features that are completely independent of eachother. And running a 3gb/s device at 1.5gb/s does not necessarily mean that you have to disable NCQ (if the device even had it in the first place since the two features or mutually independent of eachother) or any of the other features.

2. SATA spec does not contain jumpers. It's a jumperless specification. Being jumperless was one of the goals in mind when creating the SATA spec. Some drives have them but it's not spec-compliant. Most don't. And soon none will because they really aren't necessary if you have a robust speed negotiation algorithm.

3. He knows there's a jumper on his drive. He said so.

At first I was like "why did he not listen to me? :( " and then I realized that you didn't listen to anyone... We all get a little lazy sometimes. Personally I rarely read past the fist three pages of a thread unless it's really interesting conversation (which is basically never) but it was 3 posts FFS. Short decisive ones at that.

*deep breath*

But yeah. Testing speed negotiation is on SATA drives is actually something I do as part of my project. Just tested a couple 3g drives set to negotiate speed on SerDes that had been fixed at 1.5g this week (and a few 1.5g drives when I set the SerDes to use the speed-negotiation and etc.). Should work fine without worrying touching the jumpers.

And pls, pls, pls I'm begging you don't call it SATA2. Yes, I know, some things are marketed as SATA2. That's marketing and it's like sex, drugs, rock music and the devil all rolled into one: listening to marketing is bad for you. If the marketers knew what they were talking about they wouldn't be marketers they'd get real jobs.
May 4, 2007 11:02:18 PM

Flasher, I did see your post. But, I was responding to the thread opener , irrespective of your post.

And I refferred to SATA II cos that's how they are marketed by manufacturers.

Do we call a 200 GB drive a 189 GB??? No! We say " I got a 200 GB drive "
May 5, 2007 1:37:51 AM

Quote:
And I refferred to SATA II cos that's how they are marketed by manufacturers.

Do we call a 200 GB drive a 189 GB??? No! We say " I got a 200 GB drive "


Calling a drive either 200GB or 189GiB is legitimate because both definitions of Gigabyte are acceptable.

Calling a drive "SATA II" is not because there is no such thing. It doesn't matter if the marketing/manufacturers call it "SATA II" - they are just as wrong as you are.

Calling it "SATA II" is confusing because it implies that there are two different standards. There are not. SATA is one standard, and all SATA devices are interoperable regardless of the feature set they support. The lack of understanding this concept is what led to the original poster's confusion.
July 14, 2007 9:00:34 PM

Good question I had it too thanks for the answer all. SATA 1, SATA 2 SATA 150 or SATA 3.0. If you know what the people are referring to is all that matters Knit picking things like that just shows your own insecurity. Who cares if I can't spell HEHE
a b V Motherboard
a b G Storage
July 14, 2007 11:55:10 PM

SATA2 *Is the same standerd as SATA1. It is like a 2nd version of the same thing. like AGP4x vs AGP8x, the only difference is bandwith.
August 19, 2007 7:32:51 AM

Shadow703793 said:
SATA2 *Is the same standerd as SATA1. It is like a 2nd version of the same thing. like AGP4x vs AGP8x, the only difference is bandwith.


Yet another person that doesn't read...

SATA 2 is NOT another version of "SATA1"

There is ONE SATA specification, and it contains both 1.5gbps and 3gbps driver, there is NO such thing as SATA 2

AGP 4x and 8x is not a valid comparison, because both of those exist, SATA 2 does not.

Please please please read the few posts before yours before you post.
November 30, 2008 6:58:10 AM

OMG people call the FBI! Call the CIA!!! Call the White House!!! Call all 5 branches of the US Military!!!

Somebody is wrong on the freaking Internet!!!

Some of you guys really need to get a life... seriously... and check out girls every now and then... quit studying Klingon... and move the heck out of your mother's basement, too.

Why can't you just answer the guy's question and let him be?
July 6, 2011 1:43:06 AM

OMG! DUDE! ROFLMFAO!
September 25, 2011 11:31:27 PM

From http://www.sata-io.org/documents/SATA-Revision-3.0-FAQ-FINAL.pdf:

Quote:
Q11: What is the proper way to refer to the upcoming SATA 6Gb/s technology?
A11: When referring to the specification, use “Serial ATA Revision 3.0 specification” for the
first reference. For successive references, this can be shortened to “SATA Revision 3.0.” Do
not use “SATA 3.0.”


When referring to transfer rates, the technology can be correctly referred to as “SATA
6Gb/s.” Products themselves are to be called “SATA 6Gb/s <product name>.” For more
information, SATA-IO has developed Naming Guidelines with detailed recommendations.
Please note: references to “Gen 3” embedded within the SATA Revision 3.0
specification are strictly related to technical specification items and should not be
used for marketing and product naming purposes.


Being that this is Tom's Hardware, it is quite appropriate to be precise about things. Complete details here: http://www.sata-io.org/developers/naming_guidelines.asp! SATA-IO have done the hard work, please just follow their guidelines.
November 11, 2011 8:39:26 PM

that was a good laugh ... lol

in the grand scheme of things, and in general, people will use the terms sata, sata ii, and sata iii

youll see it in marketing and hear the terms thrown around in shops everywhere

i landed in this thread looking for jumper information for a wd800jd sata drive ... i have an old abit kv7 mainboard (a customers) that i was trying to get this drive to work on ... and it won't even begin to spin up, unless there is a jumper on 5-6 ... the board supports sata at 150 ... the drive is 300 ... therefore the need for the jumper ... not all drives are completely backwards compatible with all mainboards, therefore the need for the jumper

but thanks for the laugh haha
!