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A/V Receiver that supports HDTV?

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December 13, 2004 12:58:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.

According to Yamaha's specs:
85 watts x 6 channels: front left/right, surround left/right, and
front/rear center channels
Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Pro Logic IIx, DTS Neo:6, DTS-ES Matrix 6.1,
and DTS-EX Discrete 6.1 surround processing for rich, enveloping audio
Composite-video to S-video upconversion simplifies TV hookups; also
offers HD component-video switching (60 MHz bandwidth)
4 audio/video inputs, 2 digital-audio inputs; offers Yamaha Digital
ToP-ART technology, 40-station AM/FM presets

According to the specs on Best Buy:
Inputs: 2 HDTV-compatible component video, 3 S-video, 4 composite
video, 6-channel input, 3 optical digital audio, 1 coaxial digital
audio, 2 stereo audio, front panel A/V, RF antenna
Outputs: 2 component video, S-video, composite video, optical digital
audio, stereo audio, subwoofer pre-outs with 9-band selectable
crossover

I'm wondering if this is a decent choice?

More about : receiver supports hdtv

December 13, 2004 2:30:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks! I was concerned that it only had two "HDTV-compatible component
video" connectors. With a SD-soon-to-be-HD satellite receiver, a DVD
player, and an Xbox--it doesn't seem like it will work for me.
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 3:27:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

If you have mixed input types you may be better served by the 5790, which
will upconvert everything to component. That way you can have a single cable
from the receiver to the TV and no need know what input to use on the TV for
the various sources.

This receiver is about $799 in the stores and about $550 online. I believe
that there is another Yamaha model slightly cheaper that also does the same
upconversion.

"Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1102960720.599200.287170@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
> that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
> the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.
>
> According to Yamaha's specs:
> 85 watts x 6 channels: front left/right, surround left/right, and
> front/rear center channels
> Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Pro Logic IIx, DTS Neo:6, DTS-ES Matrix 6.1,
> and DTS-EX Discrete 6.1 surround processing for rich, enveloping audio
> Composite-video to S-video upconversion simplifies TV hookups; also
> offers HD component-video switching (60 MHz bandwidth)
> 4 audio/video inputs, 2 digital-audio inputs; offers Yamaha Digital
> ToP-ART technology, 40-station AM/FM presets
>
> According to the specs on Best Buy:
> Inputs: 2 HDTV-compatible component video, 3 S-video, 4 composite
> video, 6-channel input, 3 optical digital audio, 1 coaxial digital
> audio, 2 stereo audio, front panel A/V, RF antenna
> Outputs: 2 component video, S-video, composite video, optical digital
> audio, stereo audio, subwoofer pre-outs with 9-band selectable
> crossover
>
> I'm wondering if this is a decent choice?
>
Related resources
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 5:08:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Guy wrote:
> Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
> that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
> the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.
>
> According to Yamaha's specs:
> 85 watts x 6 channels: front left/right, surround left/right, and
> front/rear center channels
> Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Pro Logic IIx, DTS Neo:6, DTS-ES Matrix 6.1,
> and DTS-EX Discrete 6.1 surround processing for rich, enveloping audio
> Composite-video to S-video upconversion simplifies TV hookups; also
> offers HD component-video switching (60 MHz bandwidth)
> 4 audio/video inputs, 2 digital-audio inputs; offers Yamaha Digital
> ToP-ART technology, 40-station AM/FM presets
>
> According to the specs on Best Buy:
> Inputs: 2 HDTV-compatible component video, 3 S-video, 4 composite
> video, 6-channel input, 3 optical digital audio, 1 coaxial digital
> audio, 2 stereo audio, front panel A/V, RF antenna
> Outputs: 2 component video, S-video, composite video, optical digital
> audio, stereo audio, subwoofer pre-outs with 9-band selectable
> crossover
>
> I'm wondering if this is a decent choice?

Kinda hard to say. How much are they selling it for?

You can find receivers with specs like these selling for anywhere
between $200 and $1000. The more expensive ones tend to have a handful
of features that aren't mentioned above - things like the ability to
introduce a delay into the audio path to help solve synchronization
problems. Or the ability to upconvert from composite or S-Video to
Component or DVI.

The other big difference is how real the wattage ratings are. The term
85 watts times 6 channels is meaningless. To make it meaningful, it
needs to read something like this: 85 watts per channel x 6 channels,
with all channels driven, from 20Hz to 20KHz, at less than 0.05%
distortion.

Yamaha tends to be relatively conservative in its amp ratings, so their
85 watts might be the same as someone elses 100 watts. But it still may
turn out to be only 40 or 50 watts when rated according to a full
specification. Then again, 40-50 honest watts per channel is probably
all you need.
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 4:51:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Consumer Reports likes Yamaha in the November issue.
The YHT-450 and the YHT-750 beat out other popular brands.

Be sure to check out the Yamaha web site to see if the HTR-5740
is a last years model or is being discontinued.

hdtvfan

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:08:08 -0500, Jim Gilliland
<usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:

>Yamaha HTR-5740
December 14, 2004 9:21:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:08:08 -0500, Jim Gilliland
<usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:

>...
>The other big difference is how real the wattage ratings are. The term
>85 watts times 6 channels is meaningless. To make it meaningful, it
>needs to read something like this: 85 watts per channel x 6 channels,
>with all channels driven, from 20Hz to 20KHz, at less than 0.05%
>distortion.
>
>Yamaha tends to be relatively conservative in its amp ratings, so their
>85 watts might be the same as someone elses 100 watts. But it still may
>turn out to be only 40 or 50 watts when rated according to a full
>specification. Then again, 40-50 honest watts per channel is probably
>all you need.


Are there any websites that measure and post real wattage ratings for
electronic equipment ?

I can't believe people are so stupid they don't have adequate laws for
this kind of marketing.
December 14, 2004 1:02:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Guy wrote:
> Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
> that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
> the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.

Please pardon my ignorance here, but why does an audio system have
video inputs? I've got a Yamaha model R-V1105 receiver which has
S-video
and composite inputs I've never used, nor know how. Any helpful
introduction
would be appreciated. TIA
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 4:10:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Gene wrote:

>
> Please pardon my ignorance here, but why does an audio system have
> video inputs? I've got a Yamaha model R-V1105 receiver which has
> S-video
> and composite inputs I've never used, nor know how. Any helpful
> introduction
> would be appreciated. TIA
>

The video inputs on a receiver are used to "fan out" the inputs of a TV.
My Toshiba TW56F80 has effectively two rear inputs. I use one S-video
and one component input. The component input is used exclusively by my
DVD player. The S-video input is used exclusively by my receiver. The
receiver has no component inputs and seven S-video inputs. I use all
seven S-video inputs. When I change from one input to another, the
receiver switches the audio and the video in one step.

Matthew
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 4:22:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Gene wrote:
> Guy wrote:
>
>>Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
>>that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
>>the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.
>
>
> Please pardon my ignorance here, but why does an audio system have
> video inputs? I've got a Yamaha model R-V1105 receiver which has
> S-video
> and composite inputs I've never used, nor know how. Any helpful
> introduction
> would be appreciated. TIA
>

So you can have all your video/audio equipment going into one box,
then the video out from that box to your TV. That way you switch
everything on the a/v box, and you do not have to switch inputs on
your TV.
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 12:09:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>>>>>>* wrote:
> On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:08:08 -0500, Jim Gilliland
> <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:
>
>>The other big difference is how real the wattage ratings are. The term
>>85 watts times 6 channels is meaningless. To make it meaningful, it
>>needs to read something like this: 85 watts per channel x 6 channels,
>>with all channels driven, from 20Hz to 20KHz, at less than 0.05%
>>distortion.
>>
>>Yamaha tends to be relatively conservative in its amp ratings, so their
>>85 watts might be the same as someone elses 100 watts. But it still may
>>turn out to be only 40 or 50 watts when rated according to a full
>>specification. Then again, 40-50 honest watts per channel is probably
>>all you need.
>
> Are there any websites that measure and post real wattage ratings for
> electronic equipment ?

I've never seen one. It would take a lot of work to test that many
products.
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 4:23:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

What is the purpose to have component and video etc. on a receiver? I
have all of those connection and don't use them. i connect everything to
my hdtv and the HD receiver and use the opitical from my reciver to the
HD receiver for sound. I never could understand the reason for
connecting into your receiver for component,video etc:..can some explain
this to me does it give you a better sound or anythhing else..Thanks
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 5:37:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 14-Dec-2004, "Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote:

> Gene wrote:
>
> >
> > Please pardon my ignorance here, but why does an audio system have
> > video inputs? I've got a Yamaha model R-V1105 receiver which has
> > S-video
> > and composite inputs I've never used, nor know how. Any helpful
> > introduction
> > would be appreciated. TIA
> >

Audio/Video receivers are designed so they can function as the 'heart' of a
home theater system.

You can plug into such a receiver the audio and video outputs of a VCR, DVD,
etc. and then connect the receiver A/V outs to your tv.

This was a very important thing when most tv's had only one or a few inputs
and we had more equipment to connect. For example, my 1991 Hitachi 31" tv
has only one set of inputs: Red, White, Yellow and S-video. But I have had
two VCR's, a DVD player, Cassette recorder, Phono, etc. over the years. By
using my Sony receiver as the 'heart' of the system I can choose what I want
to watch or listen to without having to switch a lot of cables around (which
I had to do originally). When I switch the tv to Aux whatever I choose with
the receiver plays through the tv and my 5.1 speaker system.

The receiver also makes it possible to record from one VCR to the other or
from the record player to the cassette recorder, etc. It also enables me to
have Dolby and/or surround sound from any of my equipment played through my
speaker system.

Of course, most newer tv's have more inputs but a receiver still gives added
flexibility that I would not want to be without. My 51" Hitachi RPTV has
five sets of a/v inputs and two sets of a/v outputs but I still use my Sony
receiver with it. However, I can appreciate your concern as it can be very
complicated and use a lot of cables.

When my wife looks at the back of the tv and receiver her usual comment is,
"What a mess of wires back there! How do you ever keep track of what they
are for and how to connect them up?"

My answer: Sometimes it is a bit confusing!

--
John in Sun Prairie
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 6:44:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 15-Dec-2004, Bodevon02@webtv.net (Matt R.) wrote:

> What is the purpose to have component and video etc. on a receiver? I
> have all of those connection and don't use them. i connect everything to
> my hdtv and the HD receiver and use the opitical from my reciver to the
> HD receiver for sound. I never could understand the reason for
> connecting into your receiver for component,video etc:..can some explain
> this to me does it give you a better sound or anythhing else..Thanks

Well, what if you have a cable or satellite box, a VCR (or Two), a DVD
player etc. and your TV has only one set of inputs?

If you have a good receiver and speaker system, of course it will sound
better--and better yet if you use an optical input to your receiver.

--
John in Sun Prairie
Anonymous
December 15, 2004 7:44:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 15:44:53 GMT, L230j@charter.net wrote:

>
>On 15-Dec-2004, Bodevon02@webtv.net (Matt R.) wrote:
>
>> What is the purpose to have component and video etc. on a receiver? I
>> have all of those connection and don't use them. i connect everything to
>> my hdtv and the HD receiver and use the opitical from my reciver to the
>> HD receiver for sound. I never could understand the reason for
>> connecting into your receiver for component,video etc:..can some explain
>> this to me does it give you a better sound or anythhing else..Thanks
>
>Well, what if you have a cable or satellite box, a VCR (or Two), a DVD
>player etc. and your TV has only one set of inputs?
>
>If you have a good receiver and speaker system, of course it will sound
>better--and better yet if you use an optical input to your receiver.

I bought a nice Sony A/V 7.1 receiver over a year ago. It was $599
but I got it from $499. A new model with very few changes replace it.
I use component, coaxial, RCA connectors from the VCR, digital
receiver and DVD player all going to the A/V receiver.

I use a single component cable from the receiver to the Sony HDTV set.
Makes it simple to switch the DVD, VCR or Dish receiver using only the
A/V remote. I see no less quality in the analog or HD signal to the
TV going through the receiver.

I have toyed with the idea of digital cables for the TV and receiver
but have heard it may not be that great of improvement. The picture
is fabulous as is.

hdtvfan
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 5:59:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Matt R. wrote:
> What is the purpose to have component and video etc. on a receiver? I
> have all of those connection and don't use them. i connect everything
> to my hdtv and the HD receiver and use the opitical from my reciver
> to the HD receiver for sound. I never could understand the reason for
> connecting into your receiver for component,video etc:..can some
> explain this to me does it give you a better sound or anythhing
> else..Thanks

Many people use them for switching inputs to the TV. For instance, some
models have multiple component inputs (such as my Mits 55511) but only 1
supports 1080i input. If you have multiple devices, they can be switched
through the receiver.
December 16, 2004 9:02:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I was wondering how the video would be affected when run through the
receiver in question (Yamaha HTR-5740). The sales spec says:

"HDTV-compatible component video output - a component video out
frequency response range of 5Hz-60MHz ensures compatibility with HDTV
monitors and HDTVs".

Is that a good range--or will I likely see noticeable (video) signal
degradation?
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 11:44:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I have the 5760. The main difference is 100 watts per channel and the
YPAO automatic calibration feature which I really like. It
automatically callibrates for surround sound, computing delay times and
such as well as balancing the tonal output of the speakers to provide a
fairly flat response across the spectrum. I highly recommend it.

I will say that if cost is not a real big factor I would go with the
5790 as other posters have noted it does vido upconversion so you only
have to run a set of component cables to the set.

The advatage to me in this set up is I would avoid having to change
inputs on the tv as everything would run through the receiver. In my
setup this has the advatage of ease and a good spousal satisfaction
factor. :) 

At present the equipment list is:
Yamaha HTR-5760
Sony Progressive Scan DVD player
Cheesy Toshiba VCR
DTV Dual Tuner Tivo
Samsung DTV HD/OTA HD Receiver
all feeding into a Toshiba 42HP83 Plasma hanging over the mantle.

Hope this all helps you make you decision.

Matt


In article <1102960720.599200.287170@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>, Guy
<newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
> that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
> the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.
>
> According to Yamaha's specs:
> 85 watts x 6 channels: front left/right, surround left/right, and
> front/rear center channels
> Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Pro Logic IIx, DTS Neo:6, DTS-ES Matrix 6.1,
> and DTS-EX Discrete 6.1 surround processing for rich, enveloping audio
> Composite-video to S-video upconversion simplifies TV hookups; also
> offers HD component-video switching (60 MHz bandwidth)
> 4 audio/video inputs, 2 digital-audio inputs; offers Yamaha Digital
> ToP-ART technology, 40-station AM/FM presets
>
> According to the specs on Best Buy:
> Inputs: 2 HDTV-compatible component video, 3 S-video, 4 composite
> video, 6-channel input, 3 optical digital audio, 1 coaxial digital
> audio, 2 stereo audio, front panel A/V, RF antenna
> Outputs: 2 component video, S-video, composite video, optical digital
> audio, stereo audio, subwoofer pre-outs with 9-band selectable
> crossover
>
> I'm wondering if this is a decent choice?
>
December 16, 2004 11:27:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 08:44:38 -0500, HD Matt
<nospammbode@multiprintinc.comnospam> wrote:

>I have the 5760. The main difference is 100 watts per channel and the
>YPAO automatic calibration feature which I really like. It
>automatically callibrates for surround sound, computing delay times and
>such as well as balancing the tonal output of the speakers to provide a
>fairly flat response across the spectrum. I highly recommend it.
>
>I will say that if cost is not a real big factor I would go with the
>5790 as other posters have noted it does vido upconversion so you only
>have to run a set of component cables to the set.
>
>The advatage to me in this set up is I would avoid having to change
>inputs on the tv as everything would run through the receiver. In my
>setup this has the advatage of ease and a good spousal satisfaction
>factor. :) 
>
>At present the equipment list is:
>Yamaha HTR-5760
>Sony Progressive Scan DVD player
>Cheesy Toshiba VCR
>DTV Dual Tuner Tivo
>Samsung DTV HD/OTA HD Receiver
>all feeding into a Toshiba 42HP83 Plasma hanging over the mantle.
>
>Hope this all helps you make you decision.
>
>Matt
>

Is there only one output on at a time?
Thumper
>
>In article <1102960720.599200.287170@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>, Guy
><newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Any comments on the Yamaha HTR-5740? Best Buy has a special right now
>> that includes this model, the Klipsch Quintet 5.1 speaker system, and
>> the Klipsch KSW-10 subwoofer.
>>
>> According to Yamaha's specs:
>> 85 watts x 6 channels: front left/right, surround left/right, and
>> front/rear center channels
>> Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Pro Logic IIx, DTS Neo:6, DTS-ES Matrix 6.1,
>> and DTS-EX Discrete 6.1 surround processing for rich, enveloping audio
>> Composite-video to S-video upconversion simplifies TV hookups; also
>> offers HD component-video switching (60 MHz bandwidth)
>> 4 audio/video inputs, 2 digital-audio inputs; offers Yamaha Digital
>> ToP-ART technology, 40-station AM/FM presets
>>
>> According to the specs on Best Buy:
>> Inputs: 2 HDTV-compatible component video, 3 S-video, 4 composite
>> video, 6-channel input, 3 optical digital audio, 1 coaxial digital
>> audio, 2 stereo audio, front panel A/V, RF antenna
>> Outputs: 2 component video, S-video, composite video, optical digital
>> audio, stereo audio, subwoofer pre-outs with 9-band selectable
>> crossover
>>
>> I'm wondering if this is a decent choice?
>>

To reply drop XYZ in address
December 17, 2004 9:04:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I see what you mean about the 5760 and the 5790. YPAO sounds really
cool. I'm leaning towards the 5760.

Have you noticed any signal degradation pumping the video through the
5760?

I'd really like to pump both the audio and the video through the
receiver...so that only the receiver need be changed when watching
different video sources--for the wife's benefit, if nothing else. ;) 

Not sure what you mean when you say that because the 5790 does video
upconversion, only one set of component cables need be connected to the
TV. Do you have to run additional connections to the TV with the
5760...and perhaps select the video source on the TV? If so, then it
defeats the benefit of only having to change the input source on the
receiver, doesn't it?

OTOH, I kind of figured I'd tweak each input source on the TV (a
DLP)....but with all of the input potentially coming in via one
component cable, that would seem to be impossible....or perhaps not
necessary?
December 18, 2004 8:58:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks, Pat. Suddenly, the 5760 is less attractive to me. I haven't
opened my 5740 yet and was wondering if it made sense to "upgrade".

OTOH, other than my composite VCR, all of my video sources are
component: Dish 811, DVD player, Xbox. So even with the 5760, I
wouldn't need to switch inputs on the TV very often--component or
S-Video. And the YPAO feature of the 5760 sounds attractive, for not
much more $ than the 5740. So maybe I will upgrade to the 5760.

I'm connecting the video signal(s) to a Samsung DLP HL-P5063W--which
has many inputs. I was under the impression that one of the advantages
of so many inputs is that one can tweak each signal until it looks best
on the TV. With all of the inputs coming in through one cable (with the
5790) or two cables (with the 5760), that "tweak feature" is lost,
isn't it? Is that perhaps the only DISadvantage to using a receiver in
this way?
December 18, 2004 11:04:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1103335461.747285.297460@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Not sure what you mean when you say that because the 5790 does video
> upconversion, only one set of component cables need be connected to the
> TV. Do you have to run additional connections to the TV with the
> 5760...and perhaps select the video source on the TV? If so, then it
> defeats the benefit of only having to change the input source on the
> receiver, doesn't it?

That's it exactly. All sources regardless of connection, composite, s-video,
or component, can be output through the component outs on the 5790. The 5760
only upconverts to s-video. Say you have a VCR with composite video out.
With the 5790 and only a component video connection to the TV, select VCR on
the receiver and you're watching it on the TV. With the 5760, you have to
have component and s-video connections to the TV. To switch from a component
output DVD player to the VCR, you have to select VCR on the 5760 and switch
the TV's input to the s-video cable from the receiver.

Pat
December 18, 2004 1:00:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>With 3 component devices, you've exceeded the number of inputs for the

receiver. Many of today's TVs do a great job with 480i sources so you
many
want to check out the use of the Xbox or even the DVD player on s-video

before feeling it's necessary to add a component switchbox or connect
directly.

Good point; thanks. I neglected to mention that the Dish 811 may
require two inputs--one for HD and one for SD. I'm still checking into
that. The 811 has DVI, component, and S-Video outputs.
Do any of these Yamaha receivers have a DVI input?
December 18, 2004 7:50:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1103378331.908866.3510@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> OTOH, other than my composite VCR, all of my video sources are
> component: Dish 811, DVD player, Xbox. So even with the 5760, I
> wouldn't need to switch inputs on the TV very often--component or
> S-Video. And the YPAO feature of the 5760 sounds attractive, for not
> much more $ than the 5740. So maybe I will upgrade to the 5760.

With 3 component devices, you've exceeded the number of inputs for the
receiver. Many of today's TVs do a great job with 480i sources so you many
want to check out the use of the Xbox or even the DVD player on s-video
before feeling it's necessary to add a component switchbox or connect
directly.

> I'm connecting the video signal(s) to a Samsung DLP HL-P5063W--which
> has many inputs. I was under the impression that one of the advantages
> of so many inputs is that one can tweak each signal until it looks best
> on the TV. With all of the inputs coming in through one cable (with the
> 5790) or two cables (with the 5760), that "tweak feature" is lost,
> isn't it? Is that perhaps the only DISadvantage to using a receiver in
> this way?
>
My TV remembers tweaks for each resolution rather than each input. I don't
know how yours behaves. Compare different ways of hooking things up and get
an idea of how things look as well as how convenient things are to operate.
Then you can decide what system you like best. One of the reasons I got the
5790 is that I got tired of having to help other family members work the
system.

Pat
December 21, 2004 1:13:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:04:37 GMT, while reading
alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Greywolf"
<greywolfin45@*spamisbad*sbcglobal.net>:

>"Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:1103335461.747285.297460@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> Not sure what you mean when you say that because the 5790 does video
>> upconversion, only one set of component cables need be connected to the
>> TV. Do you have to run additional connections to the TV with the
>> 5760...and perhaps select the video source on the TV? If so, then it
>> defeats the benefit of only having to change the input source on the
>> receiver, doesn't it?
>
>That's it exactly. All sources regardless of connection, composite, s-video,
>or component, can be output through the component outs on the 5790. The 5760
>only upconverts to s-video. Say you have a VCR with composite video out.
>With the 5790 and only a component video connection to the TV, select VCR on
>the receiver and you're watching it on the TV. With the 5760, you have to
>have component and s-video connections to the TV. To switch from a component
>output DVD player to the VCR, you have to select VCR on the 5760 and switch
>the TV's input to the s-video cable from the receiver.

If you are in a position of having to switch audio on the receiver and video
on the TV a lot (and even if you're not), you might want to consider a nice
universal remote - specifically the Universal Remote brand MX-500 which has
macro and learning capabilities, and a programmable LCD screen. I have one,
and I've programmed the same two buttons for all functions to select the
audio for that function, and the video, so whether I'm watching a DVD, TV,
tape, whatever, the same two buttons select the correct audio and video
(although for video, it cycles the selections, since I can't go right to
it).

This remote, btw, is very nice, unlike most. Everyone I know that got one
loves it. It's IR only, but they do make higher-end ones. It can be
preprogrammed using codes, then customized by learning, then macros can be
added. It has 5 screens of 10 favorite channels, which up to 5 characters
per channel, so you can program in "CSPAN" instead of remembering the
number.




--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
December 21, 2004 4:15:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Marty" <this.address@is.invalid> wrote in message
news:cg7es0hjgnqn36jjap3s025o9iu3l6sv0k@4ax.com...
> Somewhere around Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:04:37 GMT, while reading
> alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Greywolf"
> <greywolfin45@*spamisbad*sbcglobal.net>:
>
>>"Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>news:1103335461.747285.297460@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>> Not sure what you mean when you say that because the 5790 does video
>>> upconversion, only one set of component cables need be connected to the
>>> TV. Do you have to run additional connections to the TV with the
>>> 5760...and perhaps select the video source on the TV? If so, then it
>>> defeats the benefit of only having to change the input source on the
>>> receiver, doesn't it?
>>
>>That's it exactly. All sources regardless of connection, composite,
>>s-video,
>>or component, can be output through the component outs on the 5790. The
>>5760
>>only upconverts to s-video. Say you have a VCR with composite video out.
>>With the 5790 and only a component video connection to the TV, select VCR
>>on
>>the receiver and you're watching it on the TV. With the 5760, you have to
>>have component and s-video connections to the TV. To switch from a
>>component
>>output DVD player to the VCR, you have to select VCR on the 5760 and
>>switch
>>the TV's input to the s-video cable from the receiver.
>
> If you are in a position of having to switch audio on the receiver and
> video
> on the TV a lot (and even if you're not), you might want to consider a
> nice
> universal remote - specifically the Universal Remote brand MX-500 which
> has
> macro and learning capabilities, and a programmable LCD screen. I have
> one,
> and I've programmed the same two buttons for all functions to select the
> audio for that function, and the video, so whether I'm watching a DVD, TV,
> tape, whatever, the same two buttons select the correct audio and video
> (although for video, it cycles the selections, since I can't go right to
> it).

My TV in this case is a Toshiba TW56x81. It only switches inputs by cycling
through them. I'd have to have a macro to do a TV channel change which
always goes to the first input, then progress to video1, video2, video3,
colorstream1, colorstream2. That's 5 macros just for TV input plus including
the proper wait state between each command. I don't have that have enough
macros on my learning remote to add 5. A new remote would have cost more
than the difference between a lesser receiver and the one I got even
disregarding other receiver features I liked. Switching is a lot faster too.

Pat
December 22, 2004 4:55:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

What else can you tell me about the MX-500? The review on
www.remotecentral.com is favorable. I was looking at the
Harmony/Logitech remotes, as they market themselves as the one of the
few (the only?) remote that is function-based. Not sure what that
means, especially since many other remotes support macros. Do you know?

What is the significance of your statement that the MX-500 is "IR only"?
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 1:36:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Guy wrote:
> Not sure what that means, especially since many other remotes support macros. Do you know?

Anyone can use the Harmony Remotes. Babysitters, Grandparents, etc..
It's that easy.

Push "Watch a Movie" button, everything is switched on and ready for you
to watch a movie.
Push "Watch TV" button everything is switched on and ready for you to
watch TV.
Push "Listen to Music" button everything is switched on an ready for you
to listen to music.
Push "Additional Activities" button and get any other activites you want
to se up (Play Videogame, etc.)

For instance, many people out there always say "I just want to watch
TV". Well once your remote is set up, that's what you do. You push
"Watch TV" and BAM!, you are watching TV! Just use the channel and
volume buttons as you would with any remote. Additional features are
always there (menus, etc...) as well.

The Harmony Remote is the best money I have ever spent!
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 1:36:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Steve K. (steve@nodamnspam.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> Anyone can use the Harmony Remotes. Babysitters, Grandparents, etc..
> It's that easy.
>
> Push "Watch a Movie" button, everything is switched on and ready for you
> to watch a movie.

No, actually, that won't work with my setup, since Harmony doesn't know
anything about my component video switcher, which is required for watching
a DVD movie.

OTOH, teaching my Sony RM-AV3100 that pressing the "DVD" button to do
everything needed to watch a DVD was trivial.

--
Jeff Rife | "What kind of universe is this where a man can't
SPAM bait: | love his fake wife's mother's best friend?"
AskDOJ@usdoj.gov |
spam@ftc.gov | -- Ned Dorsey, "Ned and Stacey"
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 5:41:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Steve K. wrote:
> Guy wrote:
>> Not sure what that means, especially since many other remotes
>> support macros. Do you know?
>
> Anyone can use the Harmony Remotes. Babysitters, Grandparents, etc..
> It's that easy.
>
> Push "Watch a Movie" button, everything is switched on and ready for
> you to watch a movie.
> Push "Watch TV" button everything is switched on and ready for you to
> watch TV.
> Push "Listen to Music" button everything is switched on an ready for
> you to listen to music.
> Push "Additional Activities" button and get any other activites you
> want to se up (Play Videogame, etc.)
>
> For instance, many people out there always say "I just want to watch
> TV". Well once your remote is set up, that's what you do. You push
> "Watch TV" and BAM!, you are watching TV! Just use the channel and
> volume buttons as you would with any remote. Additional features are
> always there (menus, etc...) as well.
>
> The Harmony Remote is the best money I have ever spent!

It makes my wife happy, and easier to live with since she can use it with
this huge "money pit" of equipment (her exact words), which makes my quality
of life much better.
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 5:42:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jeff Rife wrote:
> Steve K. (steve@nodamnspam.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
>> Anyone can use the Harmony Remotes. Babysitters, Grandparents, etc..
>> It's that easy.
>>
>> Push "Watch a Movie" button, everything is switched on and ready for
>> you to watch a movie.
>
> No, actually, that won't work with my setup, since Harmony doesn't
> know anything about my component video switcher, which is required
> for watching a DVD movie.
>
> OTOH, teaching my Sony RM-AV3100 that pressing the "DVD" button to do
> everything needed to watch a DVD was trivial.

It should be able to learn the commands.......
December 23, 2004 3:00:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I started this thread and should probably start a new one for remotes.
Until then, what Harmony remote(s) are you guys talking about? I heard
that the battery life is horrible and that the remote itself is fragile
(one drop and it's kaput); any truth to these rumors? I'm in the same
boat of wanting to make things easier for the wife. As it is now,
watching a DVD requires three remotes and watching TV requires at least
two remotes. That's way too many.
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 4:16:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I love the Harmony. The batteries last about 2 months, which is not
brilliant, but not a disaster. We have had the remote for about 6 months and
given it the usual abuse that 2 adults and 2 preteen kids (and their
friends) can give it - it does not seem fragile.

Like most remotes it works best if there are discrete codes for selecting
inputs and power on/off, but it does OK when codes are not available. For
example it will do the correct number of button pushes to select the correct
input on the TV, but occasionally it will end up in the wrong place, but the
help key can fix the problem.

The remote remembers the settings and then does what it needs to go from one
place to another, so if you are listening to a CD and then want to watch TV,
it makes the appropriate changes to what is powered on and off, sets the
correct inputs on the receiver and TV etc.

This is the only remote that I need to control TV/TiVo/Receiver/VCR/CD/DVD.
All of the other remotes are filed away and have not been used for months.

The kids were able to use it with no training, my wife needed a few minutes.

The big advantage over the more traditional programmable remotes like the MX
and the Philips is that there is little programming to do, there are no
macros to write - the most common ones you need are already programmed. From
a user perspective, the end user does not need to know what device is being
controlled - the volume/channel/power controls acts on the device you tell
it when you set it up and can switch depending on what you doing. So, for
example, when watching TV, the channel buttons act on the TiVo, when
listening to radio, the act on the tuner, when watching a CD they skip to
the next track. This is a big step up from the cheaper multi device remotes
where you need to tell it what device to operate (and the user needs to know
how things are controlled and something about how the system is set up). All
of the "unusual" functions are available via the LCD menus, push "device"
select TV and the LCD has all of the hundreds of buttons that your TV remote
has - and sometimes many more, but this is a little clunky and is not
generally as good as the direct access buttons on the manufacturers remote.

The Harmony is not as powerful as the fully programmable higher end remotes
like the MX series and the Pronto, but for a relatively simple set up it is
much easier to program and is easier to use and far less intimidating for
technophobes. User programmable macros are not available on the Harmony, so
for example you couldn't set it up to toggle the 30 second skip function on
your TiVo.

I tried the Pronto Neo before getting the Harmony and spend hours getting it
to do what I wanted it to do, and then realized that if I changed a
component, then I would probably need to start all over again and I really
didn't like using the touch screen.

If you have a set up with multiple amplifiers, video pre-processors and the
like and you really want have complete control over everything at all times,
the Harmony probably won't be suitable. But if you want anyone to be able to
pick up the remote and push one button to watch TV and be able to control
the basic functions like volume and channel switching the Harmony is hard to
beat. The one feature that I think is missing is the ability to program in
channel numbers for favorite channels (I guess the "media" button sort of
allows this, but that is too hard to explain to casual users).

"Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1103832034.299660.290910@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I started this thread and should probably start a new one for remotes.
> Until then, what Harmony remote(s) are you guys talking about? I heard
> that the battery life is horrible and that the remote itself is fragile
> (one drop and it's kaput); any truth to these rumors? I'm in the same
> boat of wanting to make things easier for the wife. As it is now,
> watching a DVD requires three remotes and watching TV requires at least
> two remotes. That's way too many.
>
December 23, 2004 10:03:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around Wed, 22 Dec 2004 22:36:56 GMT, while reading
alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Steve K."
<steve@nodamnspam.com>:

>Guy wrote:
>> Not sure what that means, especially since many other remotes support macros. Do you know?
>
>Anyone can use the Harmony Remotes. Babysitters, Grandparents, etc..
>It's that easy.
>
>Push "Watch a Movie" button, everything is switched on and ready for you
>to watch a movie.
>Push "Watch TV" button everything is switched on and ready for you to
>watch TV.
>Push "Listen to Music" button everything is switched on an ready for you
>to listen to music.
>Push "Additional Activities" button and get any other activites you want
>to se up (Play Videogame, etc.)
>
>For instance, many people out there always say "I just want to watch
>TV". Well once your remote is set up, that's what you do. You push
>"Watch TV" and BAM!, you are watching TV! Just use the channel and
>volume buttons as you would with any remote. Additional features are
>always there (menus, etc...) as well.
>
>The Harmony Remote is the best money I have ever spent!

Sorry, that's not possible with most equipment I've seen; it's too modal, in
that if you were watching a DVD previously, your TV may need 2 presses of
the input selection to watch TV, where if you were watching a VCR, it might
take 1 press, and if you were watching TV, it would require none. Some
receivers have similar issues.

Something like the MX-500 can come as close as you can get, though.

--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
Anonymous
December 23, 2004 10:03:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Marty" <this.address@is.invalid> wrote in message
news:te5ms0do7qrjec564bb0ui1v74rgd538pv@4ax.com...
> Somewhere around Wed, 22 Dec 2004 22:36:56 GMT, while reading
> alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Steve K."
> <steve@nodamnspam.com>:
>
> >Guy wrote:
> >> Not sure what that means, especially since many other remotes support
macros. Do you know?
> >
> >Anyone can use the Harmony Remotes. Babysitters, Grandparents, etc..
> >It's that easy.
> >
> >Push "Watch a Movie" button, everything is switched on and ready for you
> >to watch a movie.
> >Push "Watch TV" button everything is switched on and ready for you to
> >watch TV.
> >Push "Listen to Music" button everything is switched on an ready for you
> >to listen to music.
> >Push "Additional Activities" button and get any other activites you want
> >to se up (Play Videogame, etc.)
> >
> >For instance, many people out there always say "I just want to watch
> >TV". Well once your remote is set up, that's what you do. You push
> >"Watch TV" and BAM!, you are watching TV! Just use the channel and
> >volume buttons as you would with any remote. Additional features are
> >always there (menus, etc...) as well.
> >
> >The Harmony Remote is the best money I have ever spent!
>
> Sorry, that's not possible with most equipment I've seen; it's too modal,
in
> that if you were watching a DVD previously, your TV may need 2 presses of
> the input selection to watch TV, where if you were watching a VCR, it
might
> take 1 press, and if you were watching TV, it would require none. Some
> receivers have similar issues.
>
> Something like the MX-500 can come as close as you can get, though.

Actually, virtually all of the better quality new equipment has, for several
years, used discrete codes for inputs, etc. Virtually all of our
installations are done with one touch operation for all inputs. Cheaper or
older products might not have this capability, but most does these days.

Leonard
December 23, 2004 10:07:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around 22 Dec 2004 13:55:18 -0800, while reading alt.tv.tech.hdtv,
I think I thought I saw this post from "Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com>:

>What else can you tell me about the MX-500? The review on
>www.remotecentral.com is favorable. I was looking at the
>Harmony/Logitech remotes, as they market themselves as the one of the
>few (the only?) remote that is function-based. Not sure what that
>means, especially since many other remotes support macros. Do you know?
>
>What is the significance of your statement that the MX-500 is "IR only"?

IR = infra-red. Some equipment uses RF, which is useful if your equipment
is in a closet, since IR requires visibility. The higher-end remotes from
Universal Remote can do both, I think.

The MX-500 can do "function-based" or whatever you want, since it's fully
programmable. If I want to watch a DVD, I press (and hold for a second) the
DVD function button which is programmed to turn on the receiver, select DVD
sound, turn on the DVD player, turn on the TV, then leave the remote in a
mode for playing DVDs. This mode includes buttons for setting the TV
picture mode/size, and TV input, since the initial turn-on has no way of
knowing the current input setting, which needs to be cycled to the proper
input for DVD.

--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
Anonymous
December 24, 2004 2:25:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Fred Bloggs (SPAM@hotmail.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> From
> a user perspective, the end user does not need to know what device is being
> controlled - the volume/channel/power controls acts on the device you tell
> it when you set it up and can switch depending on what you doing. So, for
> example, when watching TV, the channel buttons act on the TiVo, when
> listening to radio, the act on the tuner, when watching a CD they skip to
> the next track.

This is precisely how *every* decent universal remote works, at least the
half-dozen I have played with.

> This is a big step up from the cheaper multi device remotes
> where you need to tell it what device to operate (and the user needs to know
> how things are controlled and something about how the system is set up).

This is *always* true.

You have to tell the Harmony how your switching system works, and if you
don't know how things are connected, you can't tell it what to do.

Once you know that, programming most any remote is fairly easy. And, once
programmed, they have the same kind of "touch one button to watch a movie"
setup.

--
Jeff Rife | "I've never understood the female capacity to
SPAM bait: | avoid a direct answer to any question."
AskDOJ@usdoj.gov |
spam@ftc.gov | -- Mr. Spock, "This Side of Paradise"
Anonymous
December 24, 2004 7:03:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Guy wrote:
> I started this thread and should probably start a new one for remotes.
> Until then, what Harmony remote(s) are you guys talking about? I heard
> that the battery life is horrible and that the remote itself is
> fragile (one drop and it's kaput); any truth to these rumors? I'm in
> the same boat of wanting to make things easier for the wife. As it is
> now, watching a DVD requires three remotes and watching TV requires
> at least two remotes. That's way too many.

My batteries last about 6 months (I've had it for about 1.5 yrs). I have
the 768 model. It is no more fragile than any other unit.

It is the only remote needed for the main functions for the DVD, TV, CD
Jukebox, VCR (I think it still works...), and receiver. I have been looking
at the 659, as it may be even easier for the family to use.....
December 24, 2004 9:00:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks, Fred! What Harmony model do you have? Do you know if it will
work with a Dish Network 822 receiver? (I believe it uses RF and not
IR.)
Have you found the lack of user programmable macros to be a problem?
December 24, 2004 9:03:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks, Marty. My Dish Network 822 receiver uses RF. Am I out of luck
with the MX-500? The MX-700 is way beyond my $150 budget.
December 28, 2004 2:30:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I've since learned that the 822 can be configured to work with IR.

I sprung for an MX-700. Should have it by the end of the week.

BTW, posting a message on the HTM forum on remotecentral.com might help
alleviate the power status questions you have about your Samsung.
December 28, 2004 8:41:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around Thu, 23 Dec 2004 14:17:36 -0500, while reading
alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Leonard Caillouet"
<nospam@noway.com>:


>> >The Harmony Remote is the best money I have ever spent!
>>
>> Sorry, that's not possible with most equipment I've seen; it's too modal,
>in
>> that if you were watching a DVD previously, your TV may need 2 presses of
>> the input selection to watch TV, where if you were watching a VCR, it
>might
>> take 1 press, and if you were watching TV, it would require none. Some
>> receivers have similar issues.
>>
>> Something like the MX-500 can come as close as you can get, though.
>
>Actually, virtually all of the better quality new equipment has, for several
>years, used discrete codes for inputs, etc. Virtually all of our
>installations are done with one touch operation for all inputs. Cheaper or
>older products might not have this capability, but most does these days.
>
I guess I've fallen behind and can't catch up - my Samsung 4663 TV doesn't
seem to have discreet codes for video input or picture size. Also, the on
button also turns it off, although there is a discreet off that doesn't turn
it on (but only from the universal remote, not the supplied remote).

I've given up trying to get the "best" due to having a wife and son that
will need to go to college, but I thought mine was at least part of the
"better" quality. Guess $2500 doesn't buy as much as it used to. :-(

I'm probably wrong, though, about the possibility I mentioned, as someone
said the harmony remote could remember what mode it's in - I didn't think
about that possibility, but I guess it's possible - as long as you never do
anything manually.
--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
December 28, 2004 8:44:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around 24 Dec 2004 18:03:30 -0800, while reading alt.tv.tech.hdtv,
I think I thought I saw this post from "Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com>:

>Thanks, Marty. My Dish Network 822 receiver uses RF. Am I out of luck
>with the MX-500? The MX-700 is way beyond my $150 budget.

I guess so - it's infrared only. Home entertainment is getting way too
expensive! It's possible that there are IR to RF converters. But I would
think there would be more of a market for the opposite, since many people
want to hide their stuff in a closet or other unit.

--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 3:12:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Marty wrote:
> Somewhere around Thu, 23 Dec 2004 14:17:36 -0500, while reading
> alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Leonard
> Caillouet" <nospam@noway.com>:
>
>
>>>> The Harmony Remote is the best money I have ever spent!
>>>
>>> Sorry, that's not possible with most equipment I've seen; it's too
>>> modal, in that if you were watching a DVD previously, your TV may
>>> need 2 presses of the input selection to watch TV, where if you
>>> were watching a VCR, it might take 1 press, and if you were
>>> watching TV, it would require none. Some receivers have similar
>>> issues.
>>>
>>> Something like the MX-500 can come as close as you can get, though.
>>
>> Actually, virtually all of the better quality new equipment has, for
>> several years, used discrete codes for inputs, etc. Virtually all
>> of our installations are done with one touch operation for all
>> inputs. Cheaper or older products might not have this capability,
>> but most does these days.
>>
> I guess I've fallen behind and can't catch up - my Samsung 4663 TV
> doesn't seem to have discreet codes for video input or picture size.
> Also, the on button also turns it off, although there is a discreet
> off that doesn't turn it on (but only from the universal remote, not
> the supplied remote).
>
> I've given up trying to get the "best" due to having a wife and son
> that will need to go to college, but I thought mine was at least part
> of the "better" quality. Guess $2500 doesn't buy as much as it used
> to. :-(
>
> I'm probably wrong, though, about the possibility I mentioned, as
> someone said the harmony remote could remember what mode it's in - I
> didn't think about that possibility, but I guess it's possible - as
> long as you never do anything manually.

In looking at the programing setup for the Harmony, you can either chose for
it to go directly to the selected IO point, or chose to have it scroll from
where it is at if no discrete codes for inputs are available. I couldn't
couch for how well this would work, I just noticed it as I was looking to
set up the new Comcast DVR.
December 29, 2004 8:49:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around 28 Dec 2004 11:30:40 -0800, while reading alt.tv.tech.hdtv,
I think I thought I saw this post from "Guy" <newsgroupposter@hotmail.com>:

>I've since learned that the 822 can be configured to work with IR.
>
>I sprung for an MX-700. Should have it by the end of the week.
>
>BTW, posting a message on the HTM forum on remotecentral.com might help
>alleviate the power status questions you have about your Samsung.

MX-700? Did you win the lottery? Hope it works out well for you.

Thanks for the suggestion about remotecentral.com - I'll check it out.

--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
December 30, 2004 1:34:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

FYI, the MX-700 was an open box item from an authorized reseller. $150.
!