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Urgent! CPU Temp too high???????

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May 9, 2007 1:39:55 PM

hi,

First of all I would like to say that this is my 1st post and I am so glad to have found this forum. Keep up the good work!

Okay....I've recently built my pc and I'm having some problems. The system seems to be pausing for like a split second, each time i do anything. So after leaving the PC off overnight, I got up and 1st thing in the morning switched on and accessed the BIOS.

The hardware monitor is showing the temperature at 65C and its still rising at 0.5C every five-ten seconds.

Since I've not built an Intel system in years, I don't know what is an average temperature for an E6300 core 2 duo (without overclocking). I'm worried as this seems too hot for a pc which has just been switched on!

One thing I must point out, is that when I was building the PC, the fan wouldn't clip onto the motherboard properly and although I have managed to sort this out, it seems a bit lose. If you think this might be the reason for the heat issue, can you please recommend me a cheap but good fan...i plan to overclock in the near future.

Last of all, since typing this msg, I ran the Asus Probe software and i am totally baffled with the CPU as it drops to a low of 47C and below I've taken a screenshot of it @ 57C:-



But the BIOS is always starting off at 65C+ and reached upto 71C within 2mins before I decided to switch off pc. The fan runs between 1500rpm to 1700rpm.

Do you still think its the fan or shall i assume a bug or software issue?

Are there any settings I need to change in the bios as I thought that the bios automatically sets everything?

PC SPEC:-

Intel E6300 Core 2 duo (not overclocked)
Standard CPU Fan
ASUS P5B motherboard
1GB Corair RAM
320mb point of view 8800GTS graphics card
2 x 250GB Hitachi HDD


Many thanks for helping

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May 9, 2007 1:52:09 PM

Quote:
hi,

First of all I would like to say that this is my 1st post and I am so glad to have found this forum. Keep up the good work!

Okay....I've recently built my pc and I'm having some problems. The system seems to be pausing for like a split second, each time i do anything. So after leaving the PC off overnight, I got up and 1st thing in the morning switched on and accessed the BIOS.

The hardware monitor is showing the temperature at 65C and its still rising at 0.5C every five-ten seconds.

Since I've not built an Intel system in years, I don't know what is an average temperature for an E6300 core 2 duo (without overclocking). I'm worried as this seems too hot for a pc which has just been switched on!

One thing I must point out, is that when I was building the PC, the fan wouldn't clip onto the motherboard properly and although I have managed to sort this out, it seems a bit lose. If you think this might be the reason for the heat issue, can you please recommend me a cheap but good fan...i plan to overclock in the near future.

Last of all, since typing this msg, I ran the Asus Probe software and i am totally baffled with the CPU as it drops to a low of 47C and below I've taken a screenshot of it @ 57C:-



But the BIOS is always starting off at 65C+ and reached upto 71C within 2mins before I decided to switch off pc. The fan runs between 1500rpm to 1700rpm.

Do you still think its the fan or shall i assume a bug or software issue?

Are there any settings I need to change in the bios as I thought that the bios automatically sets everything?

PC SPEC:-

Intel E6300 Core 2 duo (not overclocked)
Standard CPU Fan
ASUS P5B motherboard
1GB Corair RAM
320mb point of view 8800GTS graphics card
2 x 250GB Hitachi HDD


Many thanks for helping


Quote:
Do you still think its the fan or shall i assume a bug or software issue?


Try to reseat the heatsink. The stock Intel socket 775 fan is notorious for causing the problem you are having. The snap on HSF's like you are using are the easiest and probably the cheapest to replace. Large copper HSF's like the Zalman 9500 will improve your temps a lot. Unfortunately, the Zalman line is not cheap. Link:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...
May 9, 2007 1:57:01 PM

thanks badge for a fast reply...unfortunately I live in UK and was wondering if you can recommend a fan part in the UK...to make life easier, here is website you can help me choose from:-

www.cclonline.com


these guys are reasonably local. Just to give you an idea mate...I need a fan that will keep my pc cool even when I plan to OVERCLOCK. If you can spot a fan which clips on with a different method than the Intel one, then I'd rather have than as the intel one is a pain in the backside, lol....oh and my max spending mate is £25.

Thank You again for helping me.
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May 9, 2007 2:03:16 PM

Quote:
thanks badge for a fast reply...unfortunately I live in UK and was wondering if you can recommend a fan part in the UK...to make life easier, here is website you can help me choose from:-

www.cclonline.com


these guys are reasonably local. Just to give you an idea mate...I need a fan that will keep my pc cool even when I plan to OVERCLOCK. If you can spot a fan which clips on with a different method than the Intel one, then I'd rather have than as the intel one is a pain in the backside, lol....oh and my max spending mate is £25.

Thank You again for helping me.


Actually your stock cooler will work well if you reseat the four pins in the MB and bring the HS down flush on the CPU. Be sure to reapply thermal grease. I use the Hyper 3 Coolermaster on a socket 775 board I have been running for a year. The Hyper 3 isinstalls the same way the stock 775 cooler installs, but it has a 92mm fan at 2700 rpm and copperheatpipes. The Zalman's are better, but more difficult to install generally. The Hyper 3 will do the job.

http://www.cclonline.com/product-info.asp?product_id=70...
May 9, 2007 2:24:10 PM

Hi there,

First off; your temperatures are definately too high even for the stock HS and fan. As posted above try reseating the HS (you may want to re apply some thermal grease - make sure you clean off the old stuff first though), it really pays to take your time doing this and get it right before you switch on, its way easier if you remove the mobo from the case. Also make sure that you do up the clips in a diagonal sequence to get an even load over the cpu. The heatsink should not be at all loose if fitted correctly - if you cant get the stock one to fit right then look into buying another, you may have a problem finding one at that price range that doesn't use the standard intel fitting in which case you could end up with the same problem.

Once you've reseated the HS check all your temps again (try using intel's TAT as opposed to the asus monitor programme). Then you should be good for a reasonable overclock just using the stock HS & fan, if you want a more agressive OC then deffo get a better HS. Also check out overclockers and overclock (google) - both good UK resellers.
May 9, 2007 3:32:19 PM

thank you so much guys for that advice.

First of all what is the average range temperature a CPU should be when not overclocked? what about the overclock temperature?

Secondly, I would rather prefer if the HSF I choose is not the standard intel fitting, because I know how hard that was and would rather not have to go through that headache again, so i am sorry, but i would be most grateful if we could choose another one, even if price is a little higher.

Thanks
May 9, 2007 4:16:03 PM

I just went through the exact same thing as you, and I was running a Zalman 7700 for the CPU cooling. The person who built this for me, did a piss poor thermal paste job. It had a big spot where it got pushed away on the CPU. I would idle around 43C and run up to 81C when 3d mark was running (yikes)

Re-seated the Heatsink, added a good job of Arctic Silver, and now I idle at 28C and full load under 3d mark is 58C. Sounds like a bad paste job, or the heatsink is not making good contact.
May 9, 2007 5:22:33 PM

Hey Ripper,

You can look at the temps in my sig for a guide as what to aim for with your temps, bear in mind that I have OC and have a Vcore overvault, but anywhere close to those give or take a few degrees and you are good to go.

As for coolers, if you are willing to up your price range you could do worse than get a Zalman 9500, a little pricey, but It's very quite on the lowest (which I run it on 24/7) and it uses its own mounting system (a bit tricky but fine if you don't rush.

A lot of people seem to swear by sythe ninja? so they must be the muts nuts n'all.

Also spend a fiver on some decent thermal paste - AS5 or shin etsu should be good enough - and apply it properly.

If you do all that you should be good for a nice juicy overclock :D 
May 9, 2007 6:03:09 PM

Quote:
Hey Ripper,

You can look at the temps in my sig for a guide as what to aim for with your temps, bear in mind that I have OC and have a Vcore overvault, but anywhere close to those give or take a few degrees and you are good to go.

As for coolers, if you are willing to up your price range you could do worse than get a Zalman 9500, a little pricey, but It's very quite on the lowest (which I run it on 24/7) and it uses its own mounting system (a bit tricky but fine if you don't rush.

A lot of people seem to swear by sythe ninja? so they must be the muts nuts n'all.

Also spend a fiver on some decent thermal paste - AS5 or shin etsu should be good enough - and apply it properly.

If you do all that you should be good for a nice juicy overclock :D 


hi benzene m8,

thanks for that advice...i might read reviews for all the coolers and decide then. Just to clarify, roughly what kind of o/c can i achieve if i bought a good HSF? I only want a rough idea and nothing accurate. My PC Spec is:-

Intel E6300 Core 2 duo (not overclocked)
Standard CPU Fan
ASUS P5B motherboard
1GB Corair RAM
320mb point of view 8800GTS graphics card
2 x 250GB Hitachi HDD

Also I got the Intel Thermal Analysis Tool you recommended and this is the output:-



What do you think of it? I was doing nothing and thats the result.
May 9, 2007 6:16:32 PM

Way to hot for idle temps TBH.

I'd start by reseating what you've got, you should see a massive decrease just doing that. Good idea to read the reviews as well.

With that cpu you should be able to get at least a 30% overclock on air from what I've seen on the forums, and maybe even on the stock cooler. Bear in mind that overclock headroom differs even between CPU's of the same model and stepping, but by all accounts the E6300 can go like the clappers if well cooled, over 3Ghz on air is not unheard of :D  ...just take it carefully, start with the guide in the OC forum.

By the way, is your mobo P5B deluxe or vanilla? not sure about overclocking on the vanilla version, check the Asus mobo thread for more info on that.
May 9, 2007 8:09:12 PM

Quote:
Way to hot for idle temps TBH.

I'd start by reseating what you've got, you should see a massive decrease just doing that. Good idea to read the reviews as well.

With that cpu you should be able to get at least a 30% overclock on air from what I've seen on the forums, and maybe even on the stock cooler. Bear in mind that overclock headroom differs even between CPU's of the same model and stepping, but by all accounts the E6300 can go like the clappers if well cooled, over 3Ghz on air is not unheard of :D  ...just take it carefully, start with the guide in the OC forum.

By the way, is your mobo P5B deluxe or vanilla? not sure about overclocking on the vanilla version, check the Asus mobo thread for more info on that.


I'm just gonna replace the HSF as i'd rather have a good cooler in order to o/c.

My mobo is P5B standard, i.e NOT DELUXE...whats a vanilla?

I hope I can still o/c..or can i not? :? :( 
May 9, 2007 8:57:28 PM

Quote:
Vanilla = standard, no bells or whistles.

Found this http://forums.bit-tech.net/showthread.php?t=120993 article which suggests that you'll have no probs though.


thanks for this mate. I know we've been over the issue of HSF mate but I've just noticed something that is really bugging me and thought u might be able to help.

Everytime my pc is rebooted, the bios displays an error similar to this:-

"overclocking failed" and gives me an option to boot into setup or load defaults.

I of course load the defaults. Could this explain why i'm getting a heat issue or is this totally unrelated? FYI I just have tried upgrading to the latest BIOS, but this hasn't fixed it.

By the way when I installed the mobo, i never went into setup to alter anything as the setting were all set to "AUTOMATIC".

regards

ripper
May 9, 2007 9:30:18 PM

Quote:
Secondly, I would rather prefer if the HSF I choose is not the standard intel fitting, because I know how hard that was and would rather not have to go through that headache again, so i am sorry, but i would be most grateful if we could choose another one, even if price is a little higher.


The Intel HSF is actually not a bad one. It's just difficult to install properly. Once you get it installed it performs well.
May 9, 2007 9:57:55 PM

Quote:

Everytime my pc is rebooted, the bios displays an error similar to this:-

"overclocking failed" and gives me an option to boot into setup or load defaults.

I of course load the defaults. Could this explain why i'm getting a heat issue or is this totally unrelated? FYI I just have tried upgrading to the latest BIOS, but this hasn't fixed it.

By the way when I installed the mobo, i never went into setup to alter anything as the setting were all set to "AUTOMATIC".

regards


ripper



This has nothing to do with the temperatures your seeing.

My mobo does similar stuff sometimes - do you unplug your machine between reboots? - this can sometimes set it off. You may find that if you actually go into BIOS and alter a setting - save then exit, then switch off at the PSU before it boots to windows (I know...boring but the P5B does some strange shit..check the asus forum for false boot posts) that this message will go away.

The message seems to pop up for me after I've made some bios changes or added hardware , when I see it I hit the reset button or enter bios again and just save and exit and the bios seems to "take" the new settings...go figure 8O

good luck m8

Oh ...one more thing, what is the rated Vdimm for your RAM, I'm guessing 2.1v, in which case set it manually now and this may also stop the "overclock failed" message as default on the board is 1.8v IIRC.
May 9, 2007 11:49:17 PM

Quote:

Everytime my pc is rebooted, the bios displays an error similar to this:-

"overclocking failed" and gives me an option to boot into setup or load defaults.

I of course load the defaults. Could this explain why i'm getting a heat issue or is this totally unrelated? FYI I just have tried upgrading to the latest BIOS, but this hasn't fixed it.

By the way when I installed the mobo, i never went into setup to alter anything as the setting were all set to "AUTOMATIC".

regards


ripper



This has nothing to do with the temperatures your seeing.

My mobo does similar stuff sometimes - do you unplug your machine between reboots? - this can sometimes set it off. You may find that if you actually go into BIOS and alter a setting - save then exit, then switch off at the PSU before it boots to windows (I know...boring but the P5B does some strange ****..check the asus forum for false boot posts) that this message will go away.

The message seems to pop up for me after I've made some bios changes or added hardware , when I see it I hit the reset button or enter bios again and just save and exit and the bios seems to "take" the new settings...go figure 8O

good luck m8

Oh ...one more thing, what is the rated Vdimm for your RAM, I'm guessing 2.1v, in which case set it manually now and this may also stop the "overclock failed" message as default on the board is 1.8v IIRC.

@ benzene - This is the RAM i bought, but I haven't changed anything in the BIOS and left it on default/automatic settings:-

http://www.ebuyer.com/UK/product/92870/rb/27661441395

do u still think i need to change the settings for the ram mate?
May 10, 2007 12:07:21 AM

Pretty sure those modules are rated at 2.1V so yes, you should set that accordingly in bios.

EDIT it wont hurt to check around in the memory forum just to be sure that you can run em at 2.1v - I don't wanna feel bad if yer system goes pop :) 
May 10, 2007 2:05:17 AM

Your vcore is at 1.27v mine is at 1.21v. Drop it to 1.21 in the bios or the less one and it should bring your temps to normal.
May 10, 2007 7:57:06 AM

Quote:
Pretty sure those modules are rated at 2.1V so yes, you should set that accordingly in bios.

EDIT it wont hurt to check around in the memory forum just to be sure that you can run em at 2.1v - I don't wanna feel bad if yer system goes pop :) 


Okay mate...the only problem is that I don't know how to tell the mobo bios to let me change the options manually as I can't find any to allow me to change.


Quote:
Your vcore is at 1.27v mine is at 1.21v. Drop it to 1.21 in the bios or the less one and it should bring your temps to normal.


Thanks for that srgess...I don't know where in the bios i need to go to allow me change such a setting.
May 10, 2007 10:44:13 AM

I don't know the asus bios but there should be somewhere a plave like advanced setting or overclocking etc just search in the bios a place with Vcore or CPU voltage, its probly at default change it by the lowest one it need to be lower then your 1.27v too, if you can go lower then 1.21 try it if its not stable try one upper until your system is stable but it should be the lower 1.21v.
May 10, 2007 10:55:57 AM

Just a FYI for you, I found the Zalman 9500 fan on the website you suggested, www.cclonline.com for 30 including VAT.

Do a search for Zalman

While the stock hs and fan are decent, the Zalman is much better.
May 10, 2007 11:03:55 AM

Before buying a new fan and heatsink drop your cpu voltage you should be fine.
May 10, 2007 3:53:54 PM

thanks so much for all your advice guys...

well guess wot??? I've just gone and bought myself a zalman CPNS9500!!!! 8O

I hope I haven't made a mistake as this was the only one available that would fit in my case and provide adequent cooling power.

My only problem is that i'm baffled by the guide that zalman show in their manual and even more confused after looking at their animation on the website...do i need to take the mobo out as it says that i don't have to, yet my mobo (ASUS P5B) doesn't seem to have a back plate which is require by the fan :?

Lastly is there a simple step-by-step picture guide (Zalman animation is too confusing for me) i could follow to fit in the fan in a 775 mobo?

thanks for your help
May 10, 2007 4:35:31 PM

please ignore the above post as I have managed to place the backplate without taking out the whole of the motherboard.

I have screwed down the clip onto the backplate and now need to apply thermal grease. My only question is how do i apply the grease when they haven't provided me with a spreader? Also how much do i apply and how think of a layer does it need to be?

thanks
May 10, 2007 5:24:03 PM

a small grain of rice sized amount in the middle, u can then either use the heatsink to spread it as u attach it or use a credit card (or simular device) to spread out a thin layer.
May 10, 2007 8:14:37 PM

Quote:
please ignore the above post as I have managed to place the backplate without taking out the whole of the motherboard.

thanks


How the hell did you mange to do that?///TBH I woulda took the board out as its way easier that way.

Also; did you clean the old thermal paste off well?

What r ur temps now?

For bios instructions check here http://www.thetechrepository.com/showthread.php?t=41
this is for P5B deluxe but I doubt yours is much different - WARNING do not use the settings this guy has, just use the pictures as a guide to find where the settings you need are.
May 10, 2007 9:05:07 PM

@ Boon72 - many thanks mate...i've managed to put on a very very thin layer (less than 1mm) of thermal paste

Quote:

How the hell did you mange to do that?///TBH I woulda took the board out as its way easier that way.

Also; did you clean the old thermal paste off well?

What r ur temps now?

For bios instructions check here http://www.thetechrepository.com/showthread.php?t=41
this is for P5B deluxe but I doubt yours is much different - WARNING do not use the settings this guy has, just use the pictures as a guide to find where the settings you need are.


I managed to place the back plate under the mobo, simply by taking out the PSU. Then the screws that are holding the mobo are loosen along the middle and the ones near the PSU are totally taken out. This now allows me to slightly lift the mobo...enough to slide the back plate under the CPU.

I could have taken the whole mobo out, but i would have had to rip out everything and i think the above is only a 5min job if that.

As for the temperature, its rapidly dropped (now between 39-42C) in the bios. The Intel TAT software though is sohwing the PC temp @ 37-38C idle. It seems like the heat sink was after all causing serious problems.

Before I move onto overclocking mate, I have another issue to tackle. The PC Case I have is causing problems...the huge fan on the side is blowing the air into the pc, straight onto the CPU and i need to change the circulation, so that the air is pulled out instead as I believe Zalman recommend that no air is blown onto their HSF. Don't know if this is what i should be doing though. :?
May 10, 2007 10:19:26 PM

Yep...remove the fan that is blowing into the case from the side altogether, just leave whatever you have venting out of the case. You're aiming for a negative pressure inside the case (ie its sucking air in from the front and side vents) and a nice gentle flow across the mobo. Which case do you have by the way?

In my case I have just one 120mm fan blowing out the back, none blowing in, my psu also has a fan that sucks air from inside the case and vents it out the back.

I'm a little surprised that your temps aren't lower (still well within reason mind so don't worry), get rid of the side fan and see where you're at then, post your load temps as seen with the TAT test too next time.
May 10, 2007 10:44:20 PM

Quote:
Yep...remove the fan that is blowing into the case from the side altogether, just leave whatever you have venting out of the case. You're aiming for a negative pressure inside the case (ie its sucking air in from the front and side vents) and a nice gentle flow across the mobo. Which case do you have by the way?

In my case I have just one 120mm fan blowing out the back, none blowing in, my psu also has a fan that sucks air from inside the case and vents it out the back.

I'm a little surprised that your temps aren't lower (still well within reason mind so don't worry), get rid of the side fan and see where you're at then, post your load temps as seen with the TAT test too next time.



I'm sorry mate, but i'm new to all this terminology...can you explain how i load the pc and check temperatures, so that I can post the results here?

Secondly my pc case is a Wizard wi120A. Can't find any good links to it, but this is the one:-

http://www.anglian-internet.co.uk/products/CAS033

Last, but not least, regarding the PC Case fan...well isn't it supposed to blow in, so that it can cool down the mobo components etc????

regards
May 11, 2007 12:47:32 AM

It depends where the fan is as to which way its supposed to blow.

In general, you want a intake fan at the front bottom, and an outlet fan at the top in the back. Its a cooler air on bottom, heat rises etc concept.

This set up shouldnt cause any disturbance with your Zalman fan. If you only have one case fan, outlet is more important than intake. Like a previous poster said, some neg pressure inside the case is better as it will naturally draw air inside the case.
May 11, 2007 9:37:52 AM

thank you for that helpful info....I have no rear fan in the case, other than the PSU fan.

The zalman HSF needs to blow out air to the rear of the case and I'm wondering if i even need another rear fan, as the zalman is doing almost the same job as what a rear fan would have done in the first place...also won't adding a rear fan obstruct the zalman, by coming in its way?

thanks
May 11, 2007 11:36:36 AM

Quote:
thank you for that helpful info....I have no rear fan in the case, other than the PSU fan.

The zalman HSF needs to blow out air to the rear of the case and I'm wondering if i even need another rear fan, as the zalman is doing almost the same job as what a rear fan would have done in the first place...also won't adding a rear fan obstruct the zalman, by coming in its way?

thanks


As for a rear exhaust fan obstructing the Zalman, I have no clue,I would need a picture. Are you talking physically or airflow wise?

Maybe the simplest solution is to turn the fan on the side of your case around so it blows the other way, so that the case wants to draw in cooler air from outside from other inlets. That way you wont have competing airflows in the case.
May 11, 2007 12:15:04 PM

Quote:
thank you for that helpful info....I have no rear fan in the case, other than the PSU fan.

The zalman HSF needs to blow out air to the rear of the case and I'm wondering if i even need another rear fan, as the zalman is doing almost the same job as what a rear fan would have done in the first place...also won't adding a rear fan obstruct the zalman, by coming in its way?

thanks


As for a rear exhaust fan obstructing the Zalman, I have no clue,I would need a picture. Are you talking physically or airflow wise?

Maybe the simplest solution is to turn the fan on the side of your case around so it blows the other way, so that the case wants to draw in cooler air from outside from other inlets. That way you wont have competing airflows in the case.

When I meant obstruction, I meant an airflow obstruction, although both the zalman and the rear fan would be throwing the air out in one direction though...

I think the issue right now is:-

Should I have the Large side fan blowing INTO the case? (cool air onto the mobo components?

or

Should I have the Large side fan blowing OUT of the case? (warm air being sucked out of the case?)
May 11, 2007 12:35:21 PM

Blowing hot air OUT. This will naturally draw in cooler air unless our case doesnt have any venting (ie holes in it for air to come in through)
May 11, 2007 1:20:36 PM

Quote:
Blowing hot air OUT. This will naturally draw in cooler air unless our case doesnt have any venting (ie holes in it for air to come in through)


No mate...my case has plenty of areas where the air can come through...as i said before...at the front the air is pulled in by a 12cm fan (larger than standard).

I now will have to modify the fan, so that the air can be pulled out instead.
May 11, 2007 2:35:38 PM

Quote:
I didnt read what the other wrote, but replacing the stock hsf because you didnt properly install it sounds pretty stupid to me.
Ive installed at least a dozen of the 775 hsf's and I think they are by far the easiest ever made. 1, 2, 3, 4 pops and its in. How much easier can it get?


Thats right, but I'm used to AMD HSF's and have never put in the 775 fans before. I realised that by improperly installing the HSF, I had damaged its legs. Now instead of replacing it with another standard stock HSF, I decided that I plan to overclock, so this was my opportunity to get a better HSF.
May 11, 2007 3:44:02 PM

Quote:
Blowing hot air OUT. This will naturally draw in cooler air unless our case doesnt have any venting (ie holes in it for air to come in through)


Just to quickly give you an idea, here is a diagram showing where the fans are located and which way the air is flowing:-

May 11, 2007 5:06:30 PM

hey ripper,

right, here is what I suggest and what I would do in your situation, baring in mind that I have good low temps, an overclock and exactly the same CPU fan as you.

1. Remove the side fan that is blowing into the case, it is a waste of space and will do more to disrupt airflow in the case than cool anything and also creates a +ve pressure in there which you do not want. Reversing it so that it blows out is also a no-no as that will pull air away from the zalman and greatly reduce its efficiency.

2.Move the 12cm fan to the rear of the machine so that it vents OUT the back of your case.

With this configuration you will find that air is being passively sucked into the case from the front and sides,there will be a nice clean airflow across the mobo feeding the Zalman. The one problem that u might have with the above configuration is that most of the air will be sucked in through the side grill as opposed to through the front and therefore across your hard drives. If you feel that this is the case, block up the side vent (or a portion of it).

Hope that helps m8.
May 11, 2007 5:37:52 PM

Quote:
Yep...remove the fan that is blowing into the case from the side altogether, just leave whatever you have venting out of the case. You're aiming for a negative pressure inside the case (ie its sucking air in from the front and side vents) and a nice gentle flow across the mobo. Which case do you have by the way?

In my case I have just one 120mm fan blowing out the back, none blowing in, my psu also has a fan that sucks air from inside the case and vents it out the back.

I'm a little surprised that your temps aren't lower (still well within reason mind so don't worry), get rid of the side fan and see where you're at then, post your load temps as seen with the TAT test too next time.



I'm sorry mate, but i'm new to all this terminology...can you explain how i load the pc and check temperatures, so that I can post the results here?

Secondly my pc case is a Wizard wi120A. Can't find any good links to it, but this is the one:-

http://www.anglian-internet.co.uk/products/CAS033

Last, but not least, regarding the PC Case fan...well isn't it supposed to blow in, so that it can cool down the mobo components etc????

regards

Soory m8, just seen this post.

To load ur CPU open TAT, you'll see two buttons that say start next to the workload level indicators. Leave workload at 100% and just hit start on both buttons. Leave it a good 10 mins and see where your temps max out to.

That case looks a bit dodgy TBH (sorry) but the huge fan blowing in is gonna do more harm than good, read the post above and try that.
May 11, 2007 6:01:30 PM

Quote:

Soory m8, just seen this post.

To load ur CPU open TAT, you'll see two buttons that say start next to the workload level indicators. Leave workload at 100% and just hit start on both buttons. Leave it a good 10 mins and see where your temps max out to.

That case looks a bit dodgy TBH (sorry) but the huge fan blowing in is gonna do more harm than good, read the post above and try that.


I will look into these case fans and might try several methods to see which keeps the pc the coolest...will let you know the results.

Anyway here's the results for the test:-

At full 100% load, with the large case fan blowing ONTO the mobo, the cpu hit a max of 63 degrees. This test i ran for a whole 10 mins.

After idling for 5 mins, the temperature rapidly dropped to:-

CPU 0 = 39 Degrees
CPU 1 = 40 Degrees

Is that still too high? If so, then wouldn't you think that its because there is hardly any thermal paste on the heat spreader? :?
May 11, 2007 6:17:53 PM

Quote:

Soory m8, just seen this post.

To load ur CPU open TAT, you'll see two buttons that say start next to the workload level indicators. Leave workload at 100% and just hit start on both buttons. Leave it a good 10 mins and see where your temps max out to.

That case looks a bit dodgy TBH (sorry) but the huge fan blowing in is gonna do more harm than good, read the post above and try that.


I will look into these case fans and might try several methods to see which keeps the pc the coolest...will let you know the results.

Anyway here's the results for the test:-

At full 100% load, with the large case fan blowing ONTO the mobo, the cpu hit a max of 63 degrees. This test i ran for a whole 10 mins.

After idling for 5 mins, the temperature rapidly dropped to:-

CPU 0 = 39 Degrees
CPU 1 = 40 Degrees

Is that still too high? If so, then wouldn't you think that its because there is hardly any thermal paste on the heat spreader? :?

So, well within spec, whilst not the coolest, but not where you want to be before you start to overclock - if you have to raise ur Vcore those temps are gonna rise close to the limit.

I think that you may not have done the best job installing the zalman (but I could be wrong), really, if I were you I'd get the board out the box, take the zalman off, clean the cpu and zalman with isopropyl alcohol or timclean (maplins sells both, use a cloth that don't leave fibres behind) then reapply using a quality thermal paste (AS5, shin etsu).

Doing this will pay dividends even though it seems like a lot of work and you will then have lower temps and real peace of mind as you start to OC.

Yes, experiment! That's what its all about, try several different configurations and see what works best.

Good luck
May 11, 2007 6:33:49 PM

When I cleaned the old thermal paste off the heat spreader, I used my lacoste shirt :oops: 

Also can you double-check that the automatic bios settings have set the vcore for my cpu to the correct amount? I get the feeling that its already too high? 8O :-

a b à CPUs
May 11, 2007 7:47:23 PM

Try again to Post

Take Benzene's advice - before overclocking. I also have the 9500 cpu hsf. There instruction show that the hsf fan should be blowing toward the BACK exshast fan.

I would move the side fan to the rear. My set-up is One 120mm in rear blowing out, and One 120mm in front blowing in. My case is different and I have the 6400 vs the 6300. My system is warmer the some - but I put too much thermo paste on and haven't redone it yet.

OC'ed to 3.2 Gigs (Bus at 400)
Ambient tem is approx 24 C

Idle temp is 41 C
Load temp w/Ortho is 55, Loaded with TAT is 61
May 11, 2007 9:55:43 PM

Quote:
Try again to Post

Take Benzene's advice - before overclocking. I also have the 9500 cpu hsf. There instruction show that the hsf fan should be blowing toward the BACK exshast fan.

I would move the side fan to the rear. My set-up is One 120mm in rear blowing out, and One 120mm in front blowing in. My case is different and I have the 6400 vs the 6300. My system is warmer the some - but I put too much thermo paste on and haven't redone it yet.

OC'ed to 3.2 Gigs (Bus at 400)
Ambient tem is approx 24 C

Idle temp is 41 C
Load temp w/Ortho is 55, Loaded with TAT is 61


Sorry, but I just want to clarify that the zalman doesn't blow the air towards the side of the case, but it actually blows it out towards the rear:-



My Side fan is too big (22cm) to be moved to the rear...the max size that can be fitted at the rear is 12cm i believe. Maybe I could simply leave everything as it is and just add another 12cm rear fan to help the airflow?

I am totally confused by the readings you gave RetiredChief and would be grateful if anyone can explain my readings i gave earlier.

thanks
May 11, 2007 10:09:12 PM

Definitely do not have the side fan blowing outward. To test if it really does any good, just unplug it and see how your temps change, if at all. The rear fan should be at least as big as the front fan, because you want more air *blown out* than *blown in*, so outside air flows in through other openings to make up the difference.
May 12, 2007 12:13:52 AM

Quote:
When I cleaned the old thermal paste off the heat spreader, I used my lacoste shirt :oops: 


Now this tells me that you are not being systematic and are definitely going at this half arsed, ok it's your rig/money/time and doing it your way may not blow your machine up, but then again ....

If you are at all serious about overclocking your rig STOP, take a deep breath and begin to think like a surgeon operating on his own kid - that is the level of care that you should be trying to take with your pride and joy. If you don't want to invest the time, effort and patience to O/C right I suggest you shut the box, leave everything at stock settings, crank up your favourite game and chill with a beer. Your temps are reasonable and Vcore is fine so no probs just running it as it is.

If you are adamant that you want to continue then;

1. Goto Maplins, get some isopropyl alcohol (£2) and some decent thermal paste (£5 - AS5, shin etsu etc) and some lint free cloths (99p).

2. Download CPU-z - this little app will tell you all you need to know about the hardware in yer box apart from temps. Also download speedfan which is a nifty little tool that should allow you to adjust your fan speeds.

3. Bite the bullet; take the machine apart, get the mobo out the case, remove the heatsink and fan - clean the CPU and heatsink with the isoprop and the cloths that you bought - not, I repeat NOT with your Lacoste shirt 8O

4. Ensure that you have correctly seated the back plate of your zalman and the rest of the mounting gear - do not over tighten the screws else SNAP...my board oh noes 8O

5. When the cpu & heatsink are clean and dry apply an even, ULTRATHIN layer of AS5 across the entire surface of the CPU using an old credit/library/nectar card (do not do this while it sits in the mobo, put it on something nice and soft - a piece of foam is great). You need about a half a grain of rice sized blob of paste to accomplish this - take your time, I am very careful with this step, it takes me 5 minutes to get it perfectly thin and even!

6. Now carefully fit the zalman (you've popped the cpu into its socket of course, and its orientated correctly with the retaining lever locked in place - nice and snug).

7. Reassemble your machine, take your time - its fun. Try placing the fans as I suggested above and route all your cables neatly leaving a nice clear air path. Check everything is plugged in right.

8. Cross your fingers and toes then boot-up. Do the fans all spin? Good.

9. Now check your temperatures with TAT at load and idle - I'll bet they're sweet'n'low :D 

10. Read Wusy's guide on overclocking and crank that baby as high as you feel comfortable - stress test using orthos GO (google it).

11. Run Super Pi and be amazed at how quick you can calculate Pi to a million decimal places, feel smug that your CPU performs like a part that cost £50 more and that you have joined the ranks of geekdom.

I suggest that you also read around in the oC forum and other places as well to get a basic understanding of what your actually changing as you OC.

If you dont want to go to all this trouble I strongly suggest that you DON'T OC your PC.
May 17, 2007 6:29:15 PM

ok, after the headache caused over the last few days, where i screwed up my mobo, I have managed to work it again. Having said that, I did exactly as requested and have carefully put arctic silver 5 paste (small blob).

The temperature now is even higher and the cpu idles between 38C - 40C. Here's a few pics showing what i have done:-

Small blob:

Half spread, using a plastic card:


Fully spread, thin layer:


Another shot, showing a fully spread layer:


The current Idle temp:
May 17, 2007 7:11:30 PM

Good to hear you got your system back up and running.

Temps are looking good there. GL to ya on OC.
May 17, 2007 8:08:43 PM

Quote:
Good to hear you got your system back up and running.

Temps are looking good there. GL to ya on OC.


Grimmy mate, those temps are idle in a reasonably cool room, with the pc case off. Also the PC has not even been o/c.

Don't you think their a bit too much?
May 17, 2007 8:18:12 PM

The temps are OK. However, if you want to go for better, try redoing the thermal compound. Your last photo, especially, seems to show lots of thin lines/scratches in the layer of compound, which could end up trapping air when you apply the CPU cooler. Just apply a rice-grain-sized blob similar to your first photo, then don't spread it, but just mount the CPU cooler (which will do the spreading for you).
!