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ntfs vs. ext3 for a shared windows/linux partition

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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September 15, 2008 9:48:52 PM

My desktop has three hard drives. One holds my windows partitions, one holds linux, and the third I am going to use for data and documents. I want to be able to access this third drive from both my windows and linux installations, but can't decide if I should use NTFS and the ntfs-3g drivers for linux, or ext3 and the ext2-ifs drivers for windows. Any thoughts on how these two options compare?

Thanks,
joysofpi
a b 5 Linux
September 17, 2008 3:33:33 AM

Firstly, excellent idea on the use of a "bridge" partition! When I dualbooted I did much the same thing, and it ensures one system doesn't foul up the other.

I haven't used either (I used a fat32 that both could read/write, FUSE/ntfs-3g didn't exist) but I have heard of good results from either solution, so in my no-actual-experience-but-hearsay-opinion, either option is a good option.
September 18, 2008 9:59:08 AM

from what i have been told, the journaling for the ext3 is safer than ntfs, so i would go with that myself, but i really have little experience other than dualbooting; i use the ext2 ifs drivers with windows and they work great, but that doesnt answer the question very well
a b 5 Linux
September 18, 2008 11:57:04 PM

joysofpi said:
My desktop has three hard drives. One holds my windows partitions, one holds linux, and the third I am going to use for data and documents. I want to be able to access this third drive from both my windows and linux installations, but can't decide if I should use NTFS and the ntfs-3g drivers for linux, or ext3 and the ext2-ifs drivers for windows. Any thoughts on how these two options compare?

Thanks,
joysofpi


They are roughly the same, although Linux + FUSE (NFTS-3g) can handle NTFS better than Windows plus the ext2-IFS driver can handle ext2/ext3 in my opinion. You can't fsck ext2/3 from Windows, although Linux can let you run ntfsfix, which will do the same. I had a situation like yours and Windows killed ext2/ext3 partitions after a while (BSODing Windows left truncates and such that corrupted ext2/ext3 after a while) while Linux didn't do the same to NTFS.

One note: remember Linux supports characters in file names that Windows does not and that Windows is not case-sensitive. You don't have to worry about upsetting Linux with how you name things in Windows, only the other way around. Otherwise you can cause quite some trouble.
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