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Virtual PC or Vmware?

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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February 27, 2009 5:56:45 AM

which could run faster than the other?
i shall begin to learn linux and programming in it.
by the way,which brand of linux should i choose ?i hear the Red Hat linux frequently.

More about : virtual vmware

a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 11:31:05 AM

All the VMs are much of a muchness. You could also look at VirtualBox.

Fedora (thee free version of RedHat) is as good a choice as any if you're interested in programming.
February 27, 2009 11:37:18 AM

Ijack said:
All the VMs are much of a muchness. You could also look at VirtualBox.

Fedora (thee free version of RedHat) is as good a choice as any if you're interested in programming.

thank you very much.
Vmware seems more professional from the interface
Virtualbox is heard for the first time.
I'm interested in programming and would like take it as my job
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February 27, 2009 11:37:33 AM

Ijack said:
All the VMs are much of a muchness. You could also look at VirtualBox.

Fedora (thee free version of RedHat) is as good a choice as any if you're interested in programming.

thank you very much.
Vmware seems more professional from the interface
Virtualbox is heard for the first time.
I'm interested in programming and would like take it as my job
February 27, 2009 11:38:10 AM

thank you very much.
Vmware seems more professional from the interface
Virtualbox is heard for the first time.
I'm interested in programming and would like take it as my job
a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 5:43:04 PM

VMware is more polished since it is a commercial product.

QEMU doesn't look as nice but it's free and works fine :) 

http://bellard.org/qemu/

QEMU can emulate ARM CPUs so you can use a virtual ARM computer on your PC.

:) 
a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 6:28:20 PM

linux_0 said:
VMware is more polished since it is a commercial product.

QEMU doesn't look as nice but it's free and works fine :) 

http://bellard.org/qemu/

QEMU can emulate ARM CPUs so you can use a virtual ARM computer on your PC.

:) 

Don't forget that VMWare Server is free - it's perfect for running Linux. VirtualBox is probably the most user-friendly, and feature-rich, VM for someone not familiar with using VMs. It will even allow you to run a 64-bit guest OS on a 32-bit host (provided you have a 64-bit processor - who doesn't nowadays).

I like QEMU, but it's probably not the best choice if you've not used a VM before.

If you're into writing an OS - I digress a little here - I can heartily recommend AMD's SimNow. It's slow, but has a debugger built in that let's you single-step through your program; right from boot onwards if you want. (I know you can debug with QEMU, but it's not easy!)
a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 6:33:01 PM

VMware server also uses more space, if that's an issue.
a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 6:38:39 PM

Since feifeivictor was asking about developing on ARM, QEMU is a good choice since it emulates ARM as well as all those other architectures.

I agree with ijack that QEMU is not the most user friendly but the QEMU GUI makes it pretty easy. :) 

Also QEMU is free and open source, VMWare server is free, but restricted and not open source.

I believe you are not allowed to use VMWare server for commercial use.
a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 6:39:37 PM

I believe you are not allowed to use VMWare server for commercial use. Without buying a license that is.
a b 5 Linux
February 27, 2009 7:05:49 PM

I'm pretty sure that there are no limitations on the use of VMWare server. Of course if you want support you have to pay; but that's one of the advantages of VMWare - you can get support.

I had missed the point about ARM development, even though I did read that other thread. I still wouldn't, initially, recommend developing on an emulated ARM environment; better to use a cross-compiler on an x86-hosted Linux. It's just so much easier to set Linux up, and get all the software you need, with something like Fedora. Certainly QEMU would be useful for testing ARM stuff (or do what I did and get a Buffalo Linkstation).
February 28, 2009 8:02:30 AM

for circuit and emulation of ARM,proteus might be another choice.
I lost a chance to work directly with ARM.
Now i'm trying to find a just-so-so job,to collect some money for further study.
i may use ARM & Linux in my amateurish designs of instruments.
now my research is application of X-ray
a b 5 Linux
February 28, 2009 9:12:01 AM

VMWare Workstation rocks! It's just not free after 30 days ;) 
February 28, 2009 9:14:43 AM

we can re-setup windows every 30 days.
ghost helps speeding up the process.
a b 5 Linux
February 28, 2009 9:43:32 AM

If you use Linux as the host OS you don't have to re-install :) 

VMware server isn't supposed to expire, VMWare Workstation does.

Virtualbox, QEMU, Xen and KVM are free and open source and obviously will never expire on you.

:) 
February 28, 2009 9:46:10 AM

your suggestion is so valuable for me
!