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I need some pointers on WINE please

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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May 9, 2009 1:10:44 AM

I thought wine was for running windows apps in linux. It is but in a dual boot situation do I have to install windows apps in linux? If so how do I do that? Linux isn't going to let me do it. A command prompt I'm thinking. I'm not so good at DOS or dos like stuff. Also is there any way to access a windows partition under Linux using wine?

More about : pointers wine

a b 5 Linux
May 9, 2009 5:43:35 PM

http://www.winehq.org/help/

WINE docs


http://wiki.winehq.org/FAQ#head-9436a59348244acf33be921...

Quote:


1.6. Do I have to use the command line?

If you have a sufficiently recent version of Wine (at least 0.9.60), you do not have to use the command line to use Wine. You can use a graphical interface for most things, much like on Windows.




Cedega, the commercial version of WINE has had a GUI for a long time. I think CrossOver has a GUI as well. Cedega and CrossOver are based on WINE with some modifications and both are commercial products. WINE itself is free.

Read the wine FAQ for more info on Cedega and CrossOver.

http://cedega.com/
http://www.codeweavers.com/products/

Make sure you check the WINE appdb first to see if your app is supposed to work or not.

http://appdb.winehq.org/

Some windows apps run perfectly, some run well, some with minor bugs, some with major bugs and some do not run at all. Your mileage will vary.

You need to install your windows apps under WINE, cedega or CrossOver.

Linux can access windows partitions but running apps from the windows partition is not recommended and might break your apps under windows and even break your windows install.

http://wiki.winehq.org/FAQ#head-497f1a295d53dd3444f211d...

Quote:

3.1. I have lots of applications already installed in Windows. How do I run them in Wine?

Short answer: You have to install them in Wine just like you did in Windows. Applications usually have a setup or installer program.

Long answer: Some applications can be copied from Windows to Wine and still work, but don't try this unless you like tinkering under the hood of your car while it's running.

Wine is not designed to interact with an existing Windows installation.

WARNING: Do not try to configure Wine to point to your actual Windows C:\ drive. This will break your Windows and require a reinstall. We have tried to make this hard to do so you probably cannot do it by accident. If you do manage this, Wine may or may not continue to operate, but your Windows install will be 100% dead due to critical parts of it being overwritten. The only way to fix Windows after this has happened is to reinstall it.



Good luck :) 
a b 5 Linux
May 9, 2009 6:00:55 PM



WINE will unfortunately expose you to windows viruses, trojans, malware and spyware so you must use anti-virus software and other tools to protect yourself.

ClamAV is pretty good and AVGfree is also good.

You can install ClamAV under Linux using your Linux package manager (yum, apt-get, etc ).

AVGfree for Linux can be found here http://free.avg.com/download?prd=afl

Always scan for viruses before you run anything under WINE and disable autorun.




More from the WINE FAQ.

Quote:

11.1. Wine is malware-compatible

Just because Wine runs on Linux doesn't mean you're protected from viruses, trojans, and other forms of malware.

There are several things you can do to protect yourself:

1.

Never run executables from sites you don't trust. Infections have already happened.
2. In web browsers and mail clients, be suspicious of links to URLs you don't understand and trust.
3.

Never run any GUI application (including Wine applications) as root. (See above. )
4.

Use a virus scanner, e.g. ClamAV is a free virus scanner you might consider using if you are worried about an infection; see also Ubuntu's notes on how to use ClamAV. No virus scanner is 100% effective, though.
5. Consider removing the default Wine Z: drive, which maps to the unix root directory. This is only a weak defense, but it might help against some attacks. The downside to this is you won't be able to run Windows applications that aren't reachable from a Wine drive (like C: or D:) , so you might have to move downloaded installers to ~/.wine/drive_c before you can run them.
6. If you're running applications that you suspect to be infected, run them as their own Linux user or in a virtual machine.
Related resources
May 9, 2009 10:22:26 PM

linux_0 said:
WINE will unfortunately expose you to windows viruses, trojans, malware and spyware so you must use anti-virus software and other tools to protect yourself.

ClamAV is pretty good and AVGfree is also good.

You can install ClamAV under Linux using your Linux package manager (yum, apt-get, etc ).

AVGfree for Linux can be found here http://free.avg.com/download?prd=afl

Always scan for viruses before you run anything under WINE and disable autorun.




More from the WINE FAQ.

Quote:

11.1. Wine is malware-compatible

Just because Wine runs on Linux doesn't mean you're protected from viruses, trojans, and other forms of malware.

There are several things you can do to protect yourself:

1.

Never run executables from sites you don't trust. Infections have already happened.
2. In web browsers and mail clients, be suspicious of links to URLs you don't understand and trust.
3.

Never run any GUI application (including Wine applications) as root. (See above. )
4.

Use a virus scanner, e.g. ClamAV is a free virus scanner you might consider using if you are worried about an infection; see also Ubuntu's notes on how to use ClamAV. No virus scanner is 100% effective, though.
5. Consider removing the default Wine Z: drive, which maps to the unix root directory. This is only a weak defense, but it might help against some attacks. The downside to this is you won't be able to run Windows applications that aren't reachable from a Wine drive (like C: or D:) , so you might have to move downloaded installers to ~/.wine/drive_c before you can run them.
6. If you're running applications that you suspect to be infected, run them as their own Linux user or in a virtual machine.


I'm not going to use wine to access the net or run a windows app downloaded from the net that I don't KNOW to be clean. I anticipated the issue though. You can't make it act like windows without having it act like windows. You get the good with the bad. For the most part, if it's worth having, it's worth coding for Linux. I'm too new to Linux to do anything else right now. I do have a couple of games I'd like to run though thus the question.
a b 5 Linux
May 10, 2009 4:30:56 AM

I forgot the really important part, what kind of graphics card do you have?
!