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Linux.Installed = True

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a b 5 Linux
August 28, 2009 8:09:15 PM

Computer finally came in yesterday, got it assembled and installed Ubuntu 9.04 (starting with something simple for now, just to get to know Linux :)  ). Anyways, I'm just in the process of getting everything setup, install, etc, and I have a few questions.

1.) I'm using a TV as my monitor (this is serving as a part-time HTPC), and it uses a funny resolution. I have a resolution that fits good enough right now, but is it possible to set custom resolutions?
2.) Any programs/applications/whatever that I should install? I'm considering getting Compiz-Fusion just because I like my eye candy, but we'll see about that. All I've really installed so far is VLC.
3.) I'm trying to set up file sharing over my LAN between this rig and my Vista PC, just to transfer all my video files over. How should I go about doing this? I've never done any network file sharing before, so I'm pretty clueless.


Thanks guys :) 

More about : linux installed true

a b 5 Linux
August 28, 2009 8:35:46 PM

Also, one more question I missed :) 

4.) Is it possible to install windows drivers off of the MoBo CD in Ubuntu? It doesn't appear that there are any Linux drivers available.
a b 5 Linux
August 28, 2009 11:02:49 PM

1) What kind of TV are you using and what resolutions is it capable of?

2) Install everything :)  Okay, maybe not everything. mplayer, myth, kdetv, tvtime would be cool to have.

3) You can use samba and sftp with filezilla http://ca.samba.org/samba/docs/man/Samba-HOWTO-Collecti... http://ca.samba.org/samba/docs/man/Samba-Guide/

4) No you don't have to and you shouldn't. Your kernel should have all the drivers you need except for the proprietary VGA and maybe the wifi drivers ( a wired LAN is better ). Windows drivers do not work on Linux ( except for NDISwrapper ).

Good luck :) 
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a b 5 Linux
August 28, 2009 11:24:41 PM

1) It's a 32" Samsung LCD. Resoultion is something like 1366x768 IIRC.

2) Alright, thanks :) 

3) Thanks!

4) Alright, thanks, just wasn't sure. I got the video driver installed but it doesn't display any others *shrug*. Oh well it's working awesome :) 
August 30, 2009 6:18:45 PM

Pyroflea, I thought you were an old Linux hand? As far as I remember, you've been on this forum for ages. Had you just not taken the plunge up until now? As for programs to install I can make the following recommendations:

MP3 playback: I like audacious as it works a lot like Winamp in windows. Other people like Amarok as it has integration with things like Last.fm and can sync to that mp3 player apple makes.

Movie playback: for me, mplayer is my bread and butter. it plays ANYTHING you throw at it, and you can install a GUI for it by installing gmplayer. I've heard good things about VLC as well.

Torrent client: I really like transmission as it is a simple little program that does its job well. It works as well for me on Linux as uTorrent worked for me on windows.

CD/DVD burning: I like K3b, but if you don't feel like installing a bunch of KDE libraries on your system (they are dependencies of K3b), brasero is another good burning program.

File sharing on a windows network: You will want to set up samba. That is probably the best way to share between Linux and windows machines across a LAN.

Games: Starcraft can be made to work well in Linux under WINE with a couple of tweaks if you like strategy games. If you like artillery games like Worms, you could try installing that and using WINE, or you could install Hedgewars, which is a very similar open source game. If you like shooters, Doom3, Quake1/2/3/4, Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, and Tribes 2 all have native Linux versions. Good open source shooters include Nexuiz, Warsow, and I have heard good things about sauerbratten although I haven't tried it.

For email: you can use either Evolution or Thunderbird. I can't tell you much about either b/c i normally just use web interfaces for email.

Chat programs: Pidgin supports a huge number of different protocols. I hear the next ubuntu will be replacing it with a program called Empathy, though, which does pretty much the same thing, except it also supports video and probably VOIP. As for stand alone VOIP, you can pick between Ekiga, Skype, TeamSpeak (more for games), and I think ventrillo works if you use WINE.


Perhaps that is more than you wanted to know, but I figured I'd be thorough, just in case there are newbies lurking the forums that could benefit from this info.

--Zorak
a b 5 Linux
August 30, 2009 7:02:08 PM

Whoa! Awesome post, thanks a lot. Just for clarification, I did use Linux a couple years ago, which is when I started on this particular forum, but I didn't really use it enough to get familiar with it. I just got a small uATX rig that I'm using part time as an HTPC, so I'm finally getting familiar with it. Thanks for all the suggestions :) 
a b 5 Linux
August 30, 2009 7:29:15 PM

Also (forgot to mention) I got Samba set up yesterday, and got all my videos transferred over!
August 31, 2009 12:23:52 AM

Pyroflea said:
Computer finally came in yesterday, got it assembled and installed Ubuntu 9.04 (starting with something simple for now, just to get to know Linux :)  ). Anyways, I'm just in the process of getting everything setup, install, etc, and I have a few questions.

1.) I'm using a TV as my monitor (this is serving as a part-time HTPC), and it uses a funny resolution. I have a resolution that fits good enough right now, but is it possible to set custom resolutions?
2.) Any programs/applications/whatever that I should install? I'm considering getting Compiz-Fusion just because I like my eye candy, but we'll see about that. All I've really installed so far is VLC.

Thanks guys :) 


I take 3.) has been answered already. As for 1.) and 2.), it's usually easiest to install the proprietary ATI (or NVIDIA) driver following the tutorial here https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BinaryDriverHowto/ATI (or here https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BinaryDriverHowto/Nvi...). But chances are Ubuntu will offer you installation of the driver automatically shortly after your first login. If you're on Intel integrated graphics, chances are you already have 3D activated. If not, things might get a little ugly.

As soon as you have 3D acceleration from some driver (could even be an open-source one but then you should have had it out-of-the-box), Compiz will be at work (it comes with the default install).

You can then change the resolution via amdcccle (ATI) or nvidia-settings (NVIDIA). Alternatively, you can use xrandr (see https://wiki.ubuntu.com/X/Config/Resolution).

If you want a 10 foot HTPC solution such as mythtv, it's also better to get started with it only once 3D acceleration is alive and well.
a b 5 Linux
August 31, 2009 12:30:53 AM

Thanks for your input :) 
a b 5 Linux
August 31, 2009 2:24:29 AM

Pyroflea said:
Computer finally came in yesterday, got it assembled and installed Ubuntu 9.04 (starting with something simple for now, just to get to know Linux :)  ). Anyways, I'm just in the process of getting everything setup, install, etc, and I have a few questions.

1.) I'm using a TV as my monitor (this is serving as a part-time HTPC), and it uses a funny resolution. I have a resolution that fits good enough right now, but is it possible to set custom resolutions?


Yes. The absolute worst you'd have to do is set a new modeline using gtf and then put that in xorg.conf or use it as a new XrandR mode. I have done that with a TV that wasn't properly detected by a laptop video card.

Quote:
2.) Any programs/applications/whatever that I should install? I'm considering getting Compiz-Fusion just because I like my eye candy, but we'll see about that. All I've really installed so far is VLC.


Ubuntu installs a bunch of stuff by default, so you're good for most general-usage and office type stuff as well as media playback. If you want to do an HTPC, install MythTV. I've been running a dedicated MythTV machine from an old Athlon XP machine I rescued from the trash for a year and a half now and it's been awesome.

Quote:
3.) I'm trying to set up file sharing over my LAN between this rig and my Vista PC, just to transfer all my video files over. How should I go about doing this? I've never done any network file sharing before, so I'm pretty clueless.


You can do this several ways. The easiest is to just browse the "Windows Network" in Nautilus and you should see your Windows computer's Public folder in there somewhere. At the very worst, type in "smb://<IP_address_of_Vista_machine>" in Nautilus after pressing Ctrl+L and it will bring that up. Then just drag and drop the files. Or you could do SFTP by installing openssh-server on your Ubuntu box and an SFTP client on the Vista machine and dropping the files into your Ubuntu machine's home directory over SFTP from the Vista machine. If you're really adventurous, you could use http or ftp file transfers or get the Unix compatibility stuff for Vista and mount an NFS share from the Ubuntu machine.
a b 5 Linux
August 31, 2009 2:34:02 AM

Thanks a lot for all the help guys, starting to get things done! I've got the file sharing all working (although it transfers very slowly, will have to do a bit of testing to find the bottleneck(s) in the network), and I've got a few of the programs mentioned above installed and working. I just have to get the resolution set properly, and otherwise it's going pretty good. Starting to get quite comfortable using it :) 
a b 5 Linux
August 31, 2009 4:21:08 AM

Okay, I'm working on the whole resolution bit. I've been reading https://wiki.ubuntu.com/X/Config/Resolution#Adding%20un... as a guide. I'm just a bit unsure as to what to do here, mostly just about the beginning.

  1. $ xrandr --newmode <Mode``Line>


It tells me to enter that to create a new mode. I assume the <Mode''Line> is just replaced with the name of my choice? Please correct me if I'm wrong :) 

After that, it tells me to use the cvt utility with the resolution that I choose

  1. $ cvt 1366 768{/code]
  2.  
  3. And then copy the "Modeline" line into the terminal as follows (this is the example code, not my terminal's output):
  4.  
  5. [code] $ xrandr --newmode "800x600_60.00" 38.25 800 832 912 1024 600 603 607 624 -hsync +vsync


After that, it just ends. I don't really know what else to do. Any help is appreciated :) 



On a completely different topic, I have a feeling this will be VERY simple, but how does one install a program in Wine? I would prefer a Terminal method, but graphical is fine as well. Thanks :) 
August 31, 2009 8:18:13 AM

open ther terminal and type
sudo apt-get install wine
August 31, 2009 2:41:46 PM

Wine: after installing (sudo apt-get install wine), run "winecfg" to auto-configure wine. ONLY thing you do in the popup is changing the audio to ALSA, then confirm by pressing OK.

Then you can install Win32 executables just by double-clicking them in the explorer ("Nautilus") or on the desktop. Alternatively, install via "wine programname.exe"

----

As for your xrandr question, I don't have an Ubuntu system here to try. I can try this evening and post back. Also, don't be afraid to just play with it. As long as you don't provide incorrect horizontal and/or vertical syncs for your monitor, there's very little chance you can do any harm. Just make sure you have a copy of your xorg.conf (you can make one via "cd /etc/X11; sudo cp xorg.conf xorg.conf.old") so we can help you to get back X in case you mess things up.
a b 5 Linux
August 31, 2009 10:01:44 PM

Thanks a lot for the help guys. I got Photoshop installed (I know there's GIMP, I am just used to Photoshop) via Wine, and it's working perfectly. I've been watching a TV series that I need to catch up on (for those of you that are interested, check out the series Dexter. It's amazing!). Gonna work on the resolution issue sometime (I swear!). Thanks again though everyone. :) 
a b 5 Linux
September 1, 2009 12:56:10 AM

GIMP (better than Paint.net IMO) is nice but there's still nothing quite as powerful as Photoshop. Considering the price of PS I'd kind of hope it was the best anyway :lol: 
September 10, 2009 4:23:38 AM

Just curious, but on the subject of Myth. Over in Mythbuntu land they said run from ATI stuff. Does this include onboard vid chipsets on the 785G boards (ATI Radeon HD 4200)? I've only run Linux in a virtual box, but want things to hopefully go smoothly as possible with my Hauppauge 1900 swap over, given my lack of experience. I've looked at Sage and others that will go the Window route, but I'm attracted to the plugins and support at Myth.
a b 5 Linux
September 10, 2009 8:15:19 PM

overlandpark4me said:
Just curious, but on the subject of Myth. Over in Mythbuntu land they said run from ATI stuff. Does this include onboard vid chipsets on the 785G boards (ATI Radeon HD 4200)? I've only run Linux in a virtual box, but want things to hopefully go smoothly as possible with my Hauppauge 1900 swap over, given my lack of experience. I've looked at Sage and others that will go the Window route, but I'm attracted to the plugins and support at Myth.


Personally, I would go out of my way to pick an ATi graphics card for a MythTV machine unless you're trying to play back H.264 or MPEG-4 on a relatively low-end CPU. ATi's graphics cards with a modern kernel (2.6.30 or 2.6.31) all can use the open-source Xorg radeon driver and get excellent tear-free video playback using XVideo right out of the box. Second place would be Intel's more recent IGPs like the G43 or G45 (X4500/X4500HD) as they also use Xorg drivers, but have occasional tearing issues with XVideo. I would only recommend NVIDIA GPUs if you want to play back H.264 or MPEG-4 video on a mediocre CPU as those NVIDIA cards using NVIDIA's proprietary drivers can decode those codecs using VDPAU and significantly reduce CPU load. However, it can be a pain in the butt to install proprietary drivers and the proprietary drivers are usually less stable than the open-source Xorg ones. Also, you can't play back video using XVideo with Xorg drivers on NVIDIA GPUs if I am not mistaken.
September 10, 2009 11:33:39 PM

Thanks. I'm behind the curve and trying to catch up. Would it be ok to run the onboard 4200 chipset and save some dollars, or would you do a board (785G, G45?) with a card thrown in? I'd like something that is cool, quiet, and hibernates when it isn't recording. I want to record and playback at HQ levels and call it a day with my Replay TV box.


Regards, Owen
a b 5 Linux
September 10, 2009 11:35:35 PM

From my experience, the HD4200 seems to be working just fine. I have all of the desktop effects enabled, and I watch HD video as well as SD video, and it seems to work just fine for me.
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