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Copy files to external drive using Linux

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November 9, 2009 8:14:38 PM

I am unable to access My Documents using Windows XP; however, I can see them when booting through Linux. How do I copy these files to an external hard drive? I have no knowledge of Linux
a b 5 Linux
November 9, 2009 8:19:49 PM

It's really easy. If you boot from Linux, plug in your USB drive you should see a new device (think of it like a drive letter in Windows) appear. You can drag and drop files to this new device.

If you let us know the version of Linux that you are using then we can be more specific in the answer but it's so similar to the way Windows does it I'd say just give it a go.
November 10, 2009 1:16:42 AM

audiovoodoo said:
It's really easy. If you boot from Linux, plug in your USB drive you should see a new device (think of it like a drive letter in Windows) appear. You can drag and drop files to this new device.

If you let us know the version of Linux that you are using then we can be more specific in the answer but it's so similar to the way Windows does it I'd say just give it a go.


I have had a terrible time that started with the w32.ackantta.b@mm virus. I ran the Norton Recovery Tool which appeared to find/delete all risks. When I tried to reboot, I could not get by the Administrator login screen. It wouldn't accept the password. Subsequently, I downloaded Ophcrack to retrieve the password. Although unsuccessful, it allowed me to boot through what I think is Linux (or something similar). The download included PCMan File Manager 0.5. I was so excited because I was able to find "My Documents (especially My Pictures)." I want to transfer them to a Western Digital external hard drive so I can reinstall Windows XP. Do I have to do any kind of formatting to the external drive? I know the Linux language is different -- how might the external drive show up?
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a b 5 Linux
November 10, 2009 3:00:40 AM

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download

Download ubuntu-desktop, burn the iso, boot up, plug your external drive in and then you can copy and paste your files from your internal drive to your external one.

Your external drive will automatically open in the file manager when you plug it in. Your windows drive will probably be automatically detected.

Ubuntu-desktop is a live CD which can be used to access your windows drive. Linux is 100% immune to windows viruses unless you install WINE, which allows windows software to run on Linux.

Be careful not to do anything destructive.

Good luck :) 
November 10, 2009 10:29:39 PM

O.K., I have Ubuntu burned to a CD. Do I simply boot from the CD or should I install alongside XP? From your earlier instructions, I think I simply need to boot from the CD, but I wanted to be sure. Thanks for all your help!
a b 5 Linux
November 11, 2009 1:13:21 AM

Yea, just boot from the CD, select your language and then try ubuntu without installing on your computer.

Good luck :) 
a b 5 Linux
November 11, 2009 5:35:06 AM

peggyd said:
I am unable to access My Documents using Windows XP; however, I can see them when booting through Linux. How do I copy these files to an external hard drive? I have no knowledge of Linux


Yes, copy them onto a flash drive but avoid external hard drives unless they say they are mac-compatible (Fat32).
a b 5 Linux
November 11, 2009 5:27:04 PM

The HDD issue is a none issue as Ubuntu includes VERY good NTFS support.

Just use what you have to hand.
November 12, 2009 12:55:57 AM

Just stopped by to let you know your advice was "right on target!" I found Ubuntu very easy to use. I was able to successfully back up files on the external drive & already have XP reinstalled with all my documents copied back. Based on your comment that Linux is immune to Windows virus, I'm considering installing Ubuntu alongside to use for more risky web searches. What are your thoughts to that? Again, thanks for all your advice!!
November 12, 2009 2:54:22 AM

@peggyd, Have a look at Microsoft Security Essentials, it's a free anti-virus & anti-spyware tool from MS, it doesn't have the eye-candy some others have but it does detect things that many of the other packages miss.
a b 5 Linux
November 12, 2009 5:08:19 PM

peggyd said:
Just stopped by to let you know your advice was "right on target!" I found Ubuntu very easy to use. I was able to successfully back up files on the external drive & already have XP reinstalled with all my documents copied back. Based on your comment that Linux is immune to Windows virus, I'm considering installing Ubuntu alongside to use for more risky web searches. What are your thoughts to that? Again, thanks for all your advice!!


Just to check here, you DID scan all those documents and files that you copied back over didn't you?

Ubuntu as a tool for browsing the darker corners of the net, yes it works well for that. I've had good results using Ubuntu in a virtual machine that way before I went over to Ubuntu as the main OS for a good while.

If you are on Windows I strongly recommend using SpyBot search and destroy. It offers an 'immunize' feature which sets up a number of security measures for both IE and Firefox as well as creating a hosts file for you that stops you from connecting to a large number of known IP addresses that have been shown to host / serve malware. I find that using this together with the FlashBlock and AdBlock plugins on Firefox has been a very strong combination.
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