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BSOD-Core2Extreme QX6800, please help

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May 12, 2007 9:40:44 AM

Hi guys I have a problem where if my system gets stressed, it crashes and restarts. It's a new system I put together myself, and its driving me crazy, so I would appreciate any help.

System:
Motherboard: Asus Extreme Striker
Ram: 3 GB (3x1GB) Corsair XMS2 – 6400 (800)
GPU: 2x Nvidia GeForce 8800 GTX running in SLi
Sound Card: Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Xtreme Audio
Hard Drive: 2x Western Digital Raptor (10,000 RPM) 150 GB
CPU: Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6800
OS: Windows Vista Ultimate 32bit
Power Supply: Enermax Galaxy 850W
Chasis: Thermaltake Kandalf LCS

First let me say I’ve updated every component with the most recent drivers, and updated the bios to the newest version (1102)

The system first crashed while I was running Battlefield 2. I tried it again and the same thing happened. I figured it might be a problem with a game. But then I tested the system and ran two movies at the same time. After about a half hour the system crashed again. I ran a system stability test using the Stability Test on the Nvidia Control Panel, and the system crashed after almost a half hour.

I only ever got a Blue Screen of Death once, and the error was
Bad_pool_caller
0x000002, 0x00000007, 0x0000113d, 0x886e0620, 0x886e0628

I figured it might be the audio card, so I disabled the card from Device Manager. Unfortunately the system crashed again. The system only crashes when running something intensive, like movies, or a game, or the Nvidia stability test. The BSOD never repeated, the system just crashes and automatically reboots.

Event Viewer in the control panel lists dozens and dozens of the following Event ID 6 error:
IRQARB: ACPI BIOS does not contain an IRQ for the device in PCI slot 24, function 0. Please contact your system vendor for technical assistance.

The PCI Slot numbers in the event error change, but I read an article on the microsoft support site that said this was normal with vista, and could be safely ignored, which means I don't know if its relevant.

I’ve got a liquid cooling system on the CPU.

Unfortunately I can’t see what the temperature is for the graphics cards, because the Nvidia Control Panel doesn’t show their temperatures, even though I’ve installed ntune. I even downloaded sensors view, and it won't show my GPU temperatures either!

The whole system's only a few days old. Recently I tried to install a program, got the BSOD and the below message. I don't know if its related.
pfn_lilst_corrupt

0x0000004e (0x00000099,0x00072f1d,0x00000002,0x00048f1c)

it really sucks

I don't know whats wrong, and I'd appreciate any advice, as its driving me up the wall. Thanks!

please see attached files from cpu-z and pcprobe, they might help you see whats up!





May 12, 2007 9:48:35 AM

finally found out how to check the GPU's temperatures. They are at 78degres Celcius at idle... could this be the problem?
May 12, 2007 10:11:02 AM

78 is much idle maybe it cant handle when load.. both cards at 78? how many fans u have at ur gtx's? i would say the normal is 60-65 idle with a gtx
Related resources
May 12, 2007 10:26:04 AM

Quote:
finally found out how to check the GPU's temperatures. They are at 78degres Celcius at idle... could this be the problem?


Hot.. but I doubt it.. Nvidia driver should warn you before temp goes critical and shutting down PC and on the restart it should be mencioned as well.... try gaming under XP.. should correct the problem. If not, well maybe even some of the great Enermax powersupplies are faulty?

Before that try testing your RAM stick by stick or download Sandra/PCmark and try stressing different components to see witch stress crashes you PC sooner.

I don't know what else to add really, system specs are awesome and if I got that problem with your setup I would start testing RAM stick buy stick under WinXP before suspecting anything else.
May 12, 2007 10:32:25 AM

thanks for the advice guys.

I don't think its the temperature anymore... i ran two movies at the same time to crash the system.. when it crashed CPU was at 34 degrees celcius, and the video cards were at 79 degrees celcius, so hardly any different than idle, and the system was stable on idle.
May 12, 2007 10:38:56 AM

Honostly.. I would be VERY surpriced if it didn't turn out to be one of your memory sticks..
May 12, 2007 10:46:58 AM

This is not an hardware error. The bad_pool_caller error on BSOD indicate an driver error. That stop sign is the stop code and he points you to a bad driver. Under the 0x0000050***it shood be a name of the driver if some concrete one, if not then its a blank line. so you need to reinstall that driver, if you can find out what that is.
May 12, 2007 11:00:08 AM

Quote:
This is not an hardware error. The bad_pool_caller error on BSOD indicate an driver error. That stop sign is the stop code and he points you to a bad driver. Under the 0x0000050***it shood be a name of the driver if some concrete one, if not then its a blank line. so you need to reinstall that driver, if you can find out what that is.



OR it could be his RAM and drivers fail because of it. I've had a faulty stick once and received MASSIVE amount of errors and his problem seems very similar to mine. It could be anything but I will press on checking his Corsair Stick By Stick before anything else ! :) 
May 12, 2007 11:06:42 AM

In any case.. if you have the Corsair XMS2 that runs at CL4 and not the CL5 your memory voltage is lower then it's very minimum (1.9 instead of 2.0 if you read the manual) What RAM do you have exacly?

BTW: I just found another XMS2 that needs 2.1V of juice:

XMS2
May 12, 2007 11:12:48 AM

thanks alot for the advice gys, its much appreciated!

I decided to use the nvidia control panel to perform a stability test on individual components...

I tested the RAM first... after 20 minutes i got the BSOD

So it must be some problem with the ram. I'm worried however because shortly before that I got a message from ASUS PC Probe II that said:

there are some warnings:
NB Core Voltage

My NB Core Voltage was 1.23v at the time

Does anyone know what that message might mean?

I've started testing individual ram sticks, i'll stress test each stick for an hour. I really really really hope I find one stick that messes the system. I'm worried it might be a problem with my power supply 8O


EDIT: just saw your second post xela, thanks btw :)  My ram is listed as Corsair CM2x1024-6400

More info from back on one of my ram sticks:
5-5-5-12
800MHz
1024MB
XMS2-6400
May 12, 2007 11:19:31 AM

That is possible to, im not saying he shouldn't check his RAM but for bad RAM usually comes some of this BSOD: UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP-more common for overclockers, PFN_LIST_CORRUPT-this is in 99% bad RAM or PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA-this is also usually bad RAM and your statement "OR it could be his RAM and drivers fail because of it" would most probably be this message from BSOD.
May 12, 2007 11:20:53 AM

Quote:
thanks alot for the advice gys, its much appreciated!

I decided to use the nvidia control panel to perform a stability test on individual components...

I tested the RAM first... after 20 minutes i got the BSOD

So it must be some problem with the ram. I'm worried however because shortly before that I got a message from ASUS PC Probe II that said:

there are some warnings:
NB Core Voltage

My NB Core Voltage was 1.23v at the time

Does anyone know what that message might mean?

I've started testing individual ram sticks, i'll stress test each stick for an hour. I really really really hope I find one stick that messes the system. I'm worried it might be a problem with my power supply 8O


I can't see anything wrong with NB voltage beeing 1.23v.. I would think that it is your mobo's default. NB = North Bridge (a chip that handles communications between the CPU, RAM, AGP or PCI Express, and the southbridge.)

Before you start testing any of your sticks make sure you set RAM voltage is set to 2.1 in your bios. It won't burn your ram even if it works on lower voltage and will make sure that it gets enought juice if you have a decent XMS2 !!!
May 12, 2007 11:24:45 AM

About your edit, I found this:

http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductDetail.jsp?ProductCode=85025-2

Retail
1024 Megabytes of memory in a 240-pin DDR2 DIMM
Implemented using 64M x 8 DDR2 SDRAMs
100% tested at 800MHz in high performance DDR2 motherboards
Legendary Corsair reliability and service
Test Specs
Each module is tested in an Intel-based motherboard at 800MHz
Tested at at the latencies of (5-5-5-12) at 2.1V
SPD programmed at standard latencies of 5-5-5-12

Please note the part where it sais tested 2.1 Volt for your sticks :p 
EDIT: It will NOT heart to try 2.1 even if they say 1.9 in the manual :twisted:
10$ that we have located your problem :) 
May 12, 2007 11:30:37 AM

thanks for the great help, i would never spotted the voltage issue on my own!

Do you think I should plug all three sticks of ram back into the computer, and then raise the voltage to 2.1v and stress test all three?

What I'm saying is, does this mean the problem was with the voltage and not the ram sticks themselves?

Or should i just keep testing individual sticks? THe one stick i have in there now has been stress tested for 32 minutes now with no BSOD.
May 12, 2007 11:34:29 AM

Quote:
thanks for the great help, i would never spotted the voltage issue on my own!

Do you think I should plug all three sticks of ram back into the computer, and then raise the voltage to 2.1v and stress test all three?

What I'm saying is, does this mean the problem was with the voltage and not the ram sticks themselves?

Or should i just keep testing individual sticks? THe one stick i have in there now has been stress tested for 32 minutes now with no BSOD.


Thats what my guess would be. I found this custumer review on Newegg.com:

Tempermental


Pros: It's fast memory.

Cons: Out of 4 sticks that I purchased, one stick was bad. After a few more intermeittent crashes, I found another stick that would intermittently fail memory tests. After gross amounts of research I was able to find some lab reports on the voltages used when testing with my motherboard and it turns out that the default voltage selected by the MB was .3 V too low.

Other Thoughts: I would recommend this RAM to anyone that feels comfortable with tweaking BIOS settings, if you buy it and start experiencing crashes, random restarts etc. check with the manufacturers website and see what voltage they'd recommend for your MB. If you just want to plug-n-play, you may want to look elsewhere.

Sounds familiar? I would put all 3 sticks in and set the voltage to 1.9 exacly or to 2.0 since you don't overclock and 2.1 would be a clear overkill.

EDIT: And check your memory timings while your are at it :) 
May 12, 2007 11:38:12 AM

ok I'll try 1.9v first, stress test, then if that has issues i'll try 2.0v.

If both give me BSOD it might be a combo of low voltage and one of the ram sticks has an issue, so i'll test them individually at 1.9v

Thanks for your valuable help xela, there's absolutely nothing worse than blowing all your savings on a system, then it giving you issues.
May 12, 2007 11:44:25 AM

No problem.. I still have my savings in the pocket waiting for some real info on ATI but I have a system waiting to be ordered witch is very similar to yours only with C2D a better RAM for some overclocking :) 
May 12, 2007 11:53:28 AM

a s***it i just saw from your first post that you did get the pfn error :oops:  , in that case it IS a RAM problem and a hardware error, provably volts. sorry m8,xela i guess its not my day. :( 
May 12, 2007 11:57:27 AM

NP m8, we are both n00bs to the forum so it kinda comes with the territory :) 
May 12, 2007 12:14:01 PM

another thought might help. sometimes comp. responds badly to 3gb of ram try removing 1gb and leave 2gb in dc (1 slot and 3 slot). It is not recommended to run 3gb. 2 is better so maybe there is your problem. Im sorry if someone has mentioned that before as we all know i am bad at paying attention. :D 
May 12, 2007 12:30:30 PM

no worries OC, i appreciate help from everyone as I'm learning myself. And your conclusion was my conclusion for a long time, so i spent alot of time updating drivers, then disabling audio device etc trying to see if one of them was conflicting with vista.

I hope this voltage issue is the problem I have. So far 33 minutes stress test, and the system is stable with 3 GB of ram

I actually have a fourth stick of ram, but the technician who put it in said that the system was having problems with 4 gb of ram. He said he believed it was the asus extreme striker motherboard, which was having issues with handling 4 gb of ram.

But after all this i'm wondering if the problem was simply the voltage. With 4 sticks in, the system was probably using more power and so was unstable quicker (i think thats how it works). SO maybe he removed one stick, found the system stable, and decided the problem was the motherboard handling 4 sticks. It was only after stress testing the system that the 3 gb of ram became unstable.

If the problem was the voltage, maybe i should try sticking the fourth stick in, testing it at 1.9v and at 2.0 v
May 12, 2007 12:55:51 PM

Great news, with 3GB of ram, the stress test ran the 1 hour without any errors, restarts, bsod or anything! Thats great, it looks like we found the problem

Its something that wouldn't have ever occured to me, so thanks alot for the help xela, it is much appreciated!
May 12, 2007 1:06:51 PM

Quote:

I actually have a fourth stick of ram, but the technician who put it in said that the system was having problems with 4 gb of ram. He said he believed it was the asus extreme striker motherboard, which was having issues with handling 4 gb of ram.
If the problem was the voltage, maybe i should try sticking the fourth stick in, testing it at 1.9v and at 2.0 v


Yeap.. No way in hell a flagship ASUS mainboard could handle 4 GB of memory :p  Next time you see that technician.. run and hide untill someone else arrives :lol: 

If the test is successfull put your last stick in without giving it a 2nd thought.. and again.. check your memory timings :) 

Quote:
Great news, with 3GB of ram, the stress test ran the 1 hour without any errors, restarts, bsod or anything! Thats great, it looks like we found the problem

Its something that wouldn't have ever occured to me, so thanks alot for the help xela, it is much appreciated!


NP :) 
May 12, 2007 1:25:22 PM

i'll test the fourth stick later today, after making sure the system's stable at 1.9v

Another thing, remember i told you pc probe said my NB Core was a problem? I got another message from it now. I looked in the logs and this is what I found. Remember the first warning came before i changed the voltage on the memory, so unrelated.

===================================================
ASUS PC Probe II

Alert Log Report

Number = 5
===================================================

[05/12/2007 at 02:53 pm] NB CORE Voltage Abnormal, 0.00 V
[05/12/2007 at 02:53 pm] NB CORE Voltage become normal, 1.23 V
[05/12/2007 at 05:23 pm] 1.2VHT Voltage Abnormal, 0.00 V
[05/12/2007 at 05:23 pm] 1.2VHT Voltage become normal, 1.25 V
[05/12/2007 at 05:23 pm] 1.2VHT Voltage become normal, 1.25 V



What do you make of that?? :(  Maybe i should start a new thread, damn this system!!
May 12, 2007 1:33:37 PM

Found this quote

Quote:
thelawnet:

What CPU do you have?

The fluctuations between 1.11 and 1.26 are most probably caused by C1E or EIST. These BIOS options allow your CPU to lower its multiplier and power consumption when it is idle, resulting in lower temps. So, the 1.11V readings you are getting are probably when the CPU is idle: EIST or C1E kick in and lower the CPU speed and voltage to keep it cooler. Asus probe does not "know" this is happening so it issues an alarm. I had this "problem" and simply turned Asus probe off (by the way, Asus probe uses a LOT of resources, I ended up using CPU-Z and Speed fan instead).

You can get rid of this by turning off EIST and C1E in your BIOS, setting your CPU's voltage (Vcore) to manual, and setting the CPU multiplier manually instead of to auto. As Kusky said, however, Asus Boards (and the P5B models) have a lot of vdroop, so whatever manual Vcore you set in your BIOS, the actual VCore readings will certainly be lower. This is normal for Asus boards.

Finally, if you set your voltage manually to a constant level, it is also normal to see slight voltage drops when the CPU is under load.

Having said all this, however, if you do not overclock, I think that usually there is no advantage to turning C1E and EIST off. If you plan to use your system at stock settings, leaving everything as is, will allow your system to run cooler and consume less power.


at this site:

http://forums.anandtech.com/messageview.cfm?catid=29&th...

I hope thats the issue...

EDIT**: If the issue is the motherboard altering voltage as the system requires, maybe i should manually set the voltages in the bios, instead of keeping them on auto. Not sure what they should be set to tho
May 12, 2007 1:43:02 PM

Don't pay PCProbe more attencion then it deserves. If you had a real voltage jump like that your mobo would fry/hang/reboot at it's very least.

I would blame it on young OS (Vista) or on software (made for young OS) :) 

Another possibility is that your mobo stop posting correct voltage for some reason but that it VERY unlikely.

And in any case I can assure you that this particular post is a lie because if your northbridge voltage really jumped to 0V PC Probe wouldn't have time to tell you about that :twisted: :idea:

EDIT:

I got to go for an hour but what you found on Anandtech doesn't have anything to do with what PCProbe posted.. trust me.. you don't get 1.2 to 0 drops in NB Core voltage :) 
May 12, 2007 1:45:57 PM

ok yeah, that makes sense. I was in a game, so 0 voltage should have shut down the computer, not rang an alarm.

asus..........
May 12, 2007 1:47:47 PM

Another thing that could be causing problems: Your WC CPU... Do you have good airflow onto the VRM's around the CPU? They regulate ALL the voltages on the motherboard, and if those bad boys overheat...weirdness ensues. They're designed to be cooled primarily by spill air from the CPU HSF, but with a water cooling block- no air. Does the Striker come with extra fans for the VRMs? It should, lots of Asus boards do. Get some airflow over those puppies, stat!
a b B Homebuilt system
May 12, 2007 1:50:23 PM

why 3x1gb?
May 12, 2007 1:55:11 PM

Quote:
Another thing that could be causing problems: Your WC CPU... Do you have good airflow onto the VRM's around the CPU? They regulate ALL the voltages on the motherboard, and if those bad boys overheat...weirdness ensues. They're designed to be cooled primarily by spill air from the CPU HSF, but with a water cooling block- no air. Does the Striker come with extra fans for the VRMs? It should, lots of Asus boards do. Get some airflow over those puppies, stat!


Good point.. but his watercooling also keeps his CPU at 18 C witch I recon is a total joke (room temp needs to be like 14 for that :)  ) If that is true that temperature at the whole area on MB around CPU would be lowered somewhat by his watercooling... I think hot VRM's could be a case if he had a silent heatsink or something similar but with such a kickass watercooling setup.. very doubdfull :wink:
May 12, 2007 1:58:09 PM

apache, the fourth stick was causing some issues with the technician who installed, but now after xela's help i think the issue was voltage. I'll be sticking the fourth stick in later today after ensuring the systems' stable.

Cb62fcni, thanks for the advice. I've got the thermaltake kandalf lcs chasis, which has three large fans in front sucking in air. They cool the liquid in the liquid cooling system, and also blow air into the rest of the box. There's two fans in the back, one large, one small, blowing air out, not to mention the power supply fan sucking air out. There's also a very small fan attached perpendicularly to the CPU, which isn't necessary as its liquid cooled.

I don't know if thats enough, i know the system generates alot of heat due to the large SLi graphics cards. They average at 78 degrees celcius on idle, and go up to about 80-81 degrees celcius when running battlefield 2. Not the most graphic intensive game, so i'm sure Oblivion will raise temps much more.

I touched the graphics cards once after a stress test, NOT a good idea.

Anyway the one biggest lesson i've learned from building a system is sound. My machine is way too loud, with alot of the noise coming from the power supply...
May 12, 2007 2:10:33 PM

You should be able to check your VRM temp, it has an embedded sensor. See if you can find it. A lot of fans are great, but if none of them are actually moving air directly over the VRM HS, that's where the problems could start, know what I mean?

As for Xela, I highly doubt his CPU is at 18C, even on water. Looks like sensor error to me. Unless it's a chilled WC setup? Regardless, having a cold CPU doesn't mean your VRMs are also cold. There's been people with Phase setups that burn up their VRMs.
May 12, 2007 2:22:57 PM

ok thanks i'll try to find my VRM temperature. BTW as for the CPU temperature, asus pc probe has it at 21degrees celcius now, nvidia monitor has it at that as well, as does sensoresview pro.

I like turning my air conditioner on high, so its possible my CPU was at 18degrees Celcius, measured by pc probe earlier today. But i'll have to try to see if there's some way to check my VRM temperature, maybe from the bios?
May 12, 2007 2:54:35 PM

Quote:
ok thanks i'll try to find my VRM temperature. BTW as for the CPU temperature, asus pc probe has it at 21degrees celcius now, nvidia monitor has it at that as well, as does sensoresview pro.

I like turning my air conditioner on high, so its possible my CPU was at 18degrees Celcius, measured by pc probe earlier today. But i'll have to try to see if there's some way to check my VRM temperature, maybe from the bios?


First, don't worry about PCProbe II showing NB Voltage errrors. I have a system entirely different from yours (with an Asus P5W-DH M/B) and it also shows core voltage errors identical to yours. I solved that by switching to the older PCProbe I...

Secondly, use Coretemp to determine the CPU temperature. The onboard monitor is usually inaccurate.

Thirdly, if you're using three ram sticks then your memory is not running in dual-channel mode. There should be one stick or two sticks in each of the same-coloured slots, otherwise the memory is only running at half bandwidth.

Fourthly, Don't hedge on voltage, 2.0 volts is perfectly ok for your Corsair ram. It may be ok at the moment at 1.9 volts, but that's only an incremental increase over the voltage that was causing a lot errors. You may find that the system is still not stable enough when running Folding@home or doing heavy rendering. 8)
May 12, 2007 3:00:02 PM

it should be 4x or 2x or ram installed the ram be running in single chan if its 1 or 3 installed

allso XMS2 ram lattey does not work very well in asus motherboards
the Corsiar XMS2 1024v2.1 <<2.1 ver>> the 1.2 ver of XMS2 is fine and is Nvida cert whare as the 2.1 is not Nvidia Cert (my box had no Cert on it but my 8 month old stuff does)

my firend and i have the same problem but he had 4x of the XMS2 2.1 stuff if i drop one of them 2.1 sticks in my M2n32-SLI (his is your motherboard) my pc is randomely unstable or the PC will not boot if its in the First slot on its own

i get an refund and get other ram (even tho the Box States this mobo works best with XMS ram its true if your useing the older stuff) and Buy the 2x2GB stuff or get other 4x1gb ram
May 12, 2007 3:26:49 PM

Quote:
ok thanks i'll try to find my VRM temperature. BTW as for the CPU temperature, asus pc probe has it at 21degrees celcius now, nvidia monitor has it at that as well, as does sensoresview pro.

I like turning my air conditioner on high, so its possible my CPU was at 18degrees Celcius, measured by pc probe earlier today. But i'll have to try to see if there's some way to check my VRM temperature, maybe from the bios?


If you have a good airco in your room, your CPU temp could really be somewhere in that area, still your readings are to good to be true if you ask me :)  Don't worry about VRM temps at all as:

- People who fryed their's VRM's while phase cooling thier CPU's must have overclocked like B*tches and you are running stock speeds/voltages.
- Your Mainboard has a huge copper heatsink on top of VRM and in turn that heatsink is connected to the sinks on Northbridge and Southbridge by heatpipes. If you have doubts, just tought this system at several places after stress to be sure.

I copy that installing older PCProbe I (if it works with Vista), getting CPU temp from a reliable soft and putting your 4th ramstick while boosting voltage to 2.0 are very good ideas :) 
May 12, 2007 6:45:13 PM

1 The fact that the VRMs are connected to the NB and SB is a cause for additional worry, as that heat they produce is expected to be dissipated from the HS on the VRM. If there's isn't sufficient airflow, the NB and SB could possibly overheat as well. The amount of volts going through don't matter nearly as much as the temperature caused by these volts. You can burn them out at 1V if they overheat.

2 The temp readings ARE too good to be true. Unless the water is chilled, or you are operating outside in Antartica it is nearly impossible for there to be a reading of <30C. Possible causes: Bios, have you flashed to newest available? Download and use TAT and speedfan are report the temps you get.

3 Disable EIST and C1E.

4 Put vDIMM at 2.1V

5 If intability exists, raise your NB Volts +0.1
May 13, 2007 1:45:57 PM

well its a moot point now...

I started computer up in the morning, and no boot at all. One long continuous beeping sound. Looked it up, it said that means some sort of problem with the ram.

I tried individual sticks of ram, and discovered the following:

1.All four sticks of ram worked and the computer booted up if I stuck them in the right two slots on the motherboard.

2.But whenever i plugged any stick of ram into the two left slots on the motherboard, it wouldn't work.

Looks like the problem is with the left two slots on the motherboard. What's strange is that the system WAS booting up as of last night using those two slots.

The system was unstable before, i'm thinking it wasn't a voltage issue but something wrong with the motherboard ram slots. Upping the voltage seems to have put that problem off for a while, until this morning when the two left slots stopped working completely.

Anway have to ship it back to supplier to replace motherboard i guess... what an unbelievable pain in the butt :(  It's what i get for trying to custom build a system
May 13, 2007 2:10:19 PM

Hi cronus88

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/modules.php?nam...

Do you run your RAM at 800 MHz?
I have the same problems with Vista 32 bit + 64 bit after upgrading from 2 GB to 4GB (4 slots)

I solved the problems by setting the RAM down from 800 MHz to 667 MHz in the bios.


My system

Intel QX6700 OC to 3.33 GHz, FSB 1333 MHz (100% stable)
Intel Bad AXE2
4 GB Corsair PC8500 RAM (Running at 667 MHz in the bios)
Raptor 150 GB Harddisk
ATI X1950XT
Audigy 2
Dell Ultrasharp 2407WFP 24" widescreen
Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit
May 13, 2007 2:22:30 PM

This may have already been asked but why are you running 3 sticks of ram in a dual channel board won't it run in single channel mode when it's not in pairs :oops:  sorry I see that the question has been asked already
May 13, 2007 2:39:07 PM

Quote:
well its a moot point now...

I started computer up in the morning, and no boot at all. One long continuous beeping sound. Looked it up, it said that means some sort of problem with the ram.

I tried individual sticks of ram, and discovered the following:

1.All four sticks of ram worked and the computer booted up if I stuck them in the right two slots on the motherboard.

2.But whenever i plugged any stick of ram into the two left slots on the motherboard, it wouldn't work.

Looks like the problem is with the left two slots on the motherboard. What's strange is that the system WAS booting up as of last night using those two slots.

The system was unstable before, i'm thinking it wasn't a voltage issue but something wrong with the motherboard ram slots. Upping the voltage seems to have put that problem off for a while, until this morning when the two left slots stopped working completely.


For two sticks, you must put one each in the matching colours, one in the left, one in the right. My P5W-DH doesn't even boot with two sticks in the slots nearest the CPU, but will if they are in the far slots, though it will only be in single-channel mode. Disconnect and reconnect power completely to the power supply, put in one stick each side, then connect power, press the power button and immediately and press and hold the bottom-right "Insert" key while booting to clear the resource allocation table.
May 13, 2007 6:15:40 PM

thanks for the advice guys, i tried as you suggested. I tried running two matched sticks in the same color, but since one of them was in one of the two left slots on the motherboard it didn't work.

It really does look like the fault is in the left two slots on the motherboard. I intend to stick 4 gb of ram in once its replaced, and bring it down from 800mhz to 667mhz, so it runs smoothly.
-----------------------------------
I have another issue though:

I bought 4gb of ram, each pair sold together, supposedly a matched pair.

Please see the attached pictures of one of the two pairs at the end of this post:

Please note that while one reads:

002661 07120721-0

the other one reads:

1089524 07170873


This is the third line down.

The reason I'm pointing this out is becasue on the other matched pair, the second number is the same for both pieces of ram. And the first number on both pieces of ram are only one digit apart, so for example 000001 and 000002 (not the actual numbers of course.)

This leads me to think that i have one genuine matched pair, whereas the second pair is not a matched pair, and i got ripped off.

can anyone with alot more experience advise me? thanks alot



May 13, 2007 6:40:09 PM

Quote:
thanks for the advice guys, i tried as you suggested. I tried running two matched sticks in the same color, but since one of them was in one of the two left slots on the motherboard it didn't work.

It really does look like the fault is in the left two slots on the motherboard. I intend to stick 4 gb of ram in once its replaced, and bring it down from 800mhz to 667mhz, so it runs smoothly.
-----------------------------------
I have another issue though:

I bought 4gb of ram, each pair sold together, supposedly a matched pair.

Please see the attached pictures of one of the two pairs at the end of this post:

Please note that while one reads:

002661 07120721-0

the other one reads:

1089524 07170873


This is the third line down.

The reason I'm pointing this out is becasue on the other matched pair, the second number is the same for both pieces of ram. And the first number on both pieces of ram are only one digit apart, so for example 000001 and 000002 (not the actual numbers of course.)

This leads me to think that i have one genuine matched pair, whereas the second pair is not a matched pair, and i got ripped off.

can anyone with alot more experience advise me? thanks alot





good to hear your system has settled down. I have a similar system also water cooled. My advise to you is go ahead and run Memtest as Corsair recommends. I have already RMA'ed (2) sets of XMS2 6400C4D memory kits(the ones with the cooling fins) back them because of BSODS and random crashing especially during games. You are not alone.

I am currently running 2GB kit of Patriot Extremes at the same speed with no issues. Also, I assume you are running Windows XP 64 bit or Vista 64bit because Windows and Vista 32 will not recognize more than 2.25GB or RAM because of my SLI 8800GTX's with 4GB of RAM installed.
May 13, 2007 6:55:19 PM

Hi again cronus88

I do not believe there is something wrong with your motherboard.
Not all Motherboards support 4 GB of RAM in 4 slots.
Therefore you you need 2x2GB RAM in 2 slots to run your 4 GB RAM at 800 MHz

This is from Mondoman:
See http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/modules.php?nam...

The problem in general is that with unbuffered RAM, the more DIMMs installed, the weaker the signals to each DIMM, since they all share the same signals without any buffering or regeneration. If you are already pushing your system near the edge (e.g. by OCing the FSB), then running 4 DIMMs instead of 2 may push it over the edge. Running the memory bus at DDR2-667 instead of DDR2-800 in effect lessens the tolerances on the signals and pulls the system back from the edge.
May 13, 2007 7:07:45 PM

Quote:
Hi again cronus88

I do not believe there is something wrong with your motherboard.
Not all Motherboards support 4 GB of RAM in 4 slots.
Therefore you you need 2x2GB RAM in 2 slots to run your 4 GB RAM at 800 MHz

This is from Mondoman:
See http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/modules.php?nam...

The problem in general is that with unbuffered RAM, the more DIMMs installed, the weaker the signals to each DIMM, since they all share the same signals without any buffering or regeneration. If you are already pushing your system near the edge (e.g. by OCing the FSB), then running 4 DIMMs instead of 2 may push it over the edge. Running the memory bus at DDR2-667 instead of DDR2-800 in effect lessens the tolerances on the signals and pulls the system back from the edge.


Like mine, his is a 680iSLI high performance motherboard. They are designed to support up to 8GB of RAM up to at least 1200Mhz. 4Ghz is not an issue unless the RAM is bad like I have found out using Corsair memory.

He should be able to run two sets of dual channel 2GB sticks in each slot with no issues if he wishes.
May 13, 2007 7:24:19 PM

thanks for the replies guys, much appreciated.

Luke7: its not the 4gb of ram issue, i've never actually even put all 4 sticks in at once, the most i ever put in was 3. And now even one stick of ram in either of the two left slots and the system won't boot up.

As for the two right slots, I'm getting BSOD even on those after playing half life 2, so it looks like the whole system is crapped. Next step is just up the voltage to 2.1v, and see if i have the same problems in the two right slots.


It's not a voltage issue anymore, because i can't get the system to boot up with even one stick of ram in either of the two left slots.

EIther of the two right slots the system boots up fine, unless I stress it upon which i get BSOD.

----------

warezme could you please explain a bit more the below:

Quote:
I am currently running 2GB kit of Patriot Extremes at the same speed with no issues. Also, I assume you are running Windows XP 64 bit or Vista 64bit because Windows and Vista 32 will not recognize more than 2.25GB or RAM because of my SLI 8800GTX's with 4GB of RAM installed.


I had xp 32 bit and it ran 3gb of ram with no problems, though it was at 533mhz.

thanks again for the help.
May 13, 2007 7:48:59 PM

Quote:
thanks for the replies guys, much appreciated.

Luke7: its not the 4gb of ram issue, i've never actually even put all 4 sticks in at once, the most i ever put in was 3. And now even one stick of ram in either of the two left slots and the system won't boot up.

As for the two right slots, I'm getting BSOD even on those after playing half life 2, so it looks like the whole system is crapped. Next step is just up the voltage to 2.1v, and see if i have the same problems in the two right slots.


It's not a voltage issue anymore, because i can't get the system to boot up with even one stick of ram in either of the two left slots.

EIther of the two right slots the system boots up fine, unless I stress it upon which i get BSOD.

----------

warezme could you please explain a bit more the below:

I am currently running 2GB kit of Patriot Extremes at the same speed with no issues. Also, I assume you are running Windows XP 64 bit or Vista 64bit because Windows and Vista 32 will not recognize more than 2.25GB or RAM because of my SLI 8800GTX's with 4GB of RAM installed.


I had xp 32 bit and it ran 3gb of ram with no problems, though it was at 533mhz.

thanks again for the help.

sure dude, your board, again like mine will support up to 8GB of dual channel memory. These are run in sets like (2) 1GB sticks or (2) 2GB sticks up to (4) 2GB stick in all four slots. The slots are color coded and each matched "pair" goes into matching color slots to complete their dual channel link.

In your case 3GB is an odd number and your system will likely default to single channel X 3GB because you have a missing set.

Also ONLY Windows XP 64bit and Windows VISTA 64bit will support more than 4GB of RAM.

Windows XP 32 bit and Vista are supposed to recognize up to 4GB. Because of your SLI..., it will NOT.

The reason being, is drivers will take up a big chunk of accessible memory and Windows will not "see" more than 2.25GB even though you may have 4GB or RAM installed.

The memory available is especially limited because of your SLI setup. SLI is taking up a huge chunk of memory access space.

I have already run into this problem and searched everywhere for the answer. The only fix is to Install 64bit windows or Windows server version. So, I said forget that and pulled out 2GB of unused RAM and left just 2GB instead.

I am sure your memory is faulty and you should just RMA it back. Run Memtest from a bootable CD with the memory set to 4-4-4-12, 2.1v. This is the rated speed for your Corsair's C4D's if they fail with errors, return them. They should perform at their rated speed. You have an expensive high performance board designed to handle all this. You do not need to downclock or slow them down. If they do not work, send them back.

If they do not fail than yes, you may have a bad board.
May 13, 2007 8:14:11 PM

Hi warezme

If you can give me advice me in how I can run my 4 GB at 800 MHz I would be thanks full.
I can run 4 GB at 800 MHz if I do not OC my system. FSB default at 1066 (266) MHz.
As soon as I set the FSB over 320 MHz I need to down clock my RAM to 667 in the BIOS, when all 4 slots are in use.
I want to run my system at 3.33 GHz and the FSB at 1333 MHz (333 MHz)
My system

Intel QX6700 OC to 3.33 GHz, FSB 1333 MHz (100% stable)
Intel Bad AXE2
4 GB Corsair PC8500 RAM (Running at 667 MHz in the bios) 5-5-5-15. Volt settings 2.2
Raptor 150 GB Harddisk
ATI X1950XT
Audigy 2
Dell Ultrasharp 2407WFP 24" widescreen
Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit
May 13, 2007 8:34:12 PM

Quote:
Hi warezme

If you can give me advice me in how I can run my 4 GB at 800 MHz I would be thanks full.
I can run 4 GB at 800 MHz if I do not OC my system. FSB default at 1066 (266) MHz.
As soon as I set the FSB over 320 MHz I need to down clock my RAM to 667 in the BIOS, when all 4 slots are in use.
I want to run my system at 3.33 GHz and the FSB at 1333 MHz (333 MHz)
My system

Intel QX6700 OC to 3.33 GHz, FSB 1333 MHz (100% stable)
Intel Bad AXE2
4 GB Corsair PC8500 RAM (Running at 667 MHz in the bios) 5-5-5-15. Volt settings 2.2
Raptor 150 GB Harddisk
ATI X1950XT
Audigy 2
Dell Ultrasharp 2407WFP 24" widescreen
Windows Vista Ultimate 64 bit


There are a couple of things you can try. The easiest thing if your motherboard supports this since I am unfamiliar with this board is to run the memory FSB UNLINKED from the main system FSB (a bios setting). This is an option that allows your CPU FSB to be raised independently of your memory.

This lets you bump up your CPU as high as it can go stable leaving the memory at its best rated speed.

The second and more difficult way is to run something like the latest version of CPU-Z, available at guru3d.com and see what SPD (speeds) are available for your RAM. These are sets of manufacture programmed speeds that are best for your RAM.

One speed will be its highest speed with the tightest timings, ex: 5-5-5-15 1056, and another speed will be the highest speed with much looser timings, ex: 6-6-7-16 1200. these are just examples and not necessarily what your memory is programmed for.

If you cannot UNLINK your memory FSB from the system than you can manually input the slower timings but higher speed timings and push your system FSB higher.

Good luck,
!