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Using Linux to port files from OS X (power pc) drives to Win 7 drives

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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December 31, 2009 7:41:11 PM

Recently, my Quad G5 mac fried (power pc chipset) and I'm building a new Windows 7 system. I'm trying to figure out the best and fastest way to move all the data from my OS X drives (1 500 gb with files/apps, 1 1 tb with files, 1 external 1 tb with files) on to newly formatted Windows 7 drives.

Furthermore, I would like to install Win 7 on the 500 gb.

My initial thought is to boot the new, fresh system from a Linux disk and move all the files within Linux. Something like this:
In Linux:

1. Move all the files I want to keep from the 500gb on to the 1tb, then format the 500 gb for Win 7.

2. Move all files from old 1tb to new, clean 1 tb

3. Format old 1 tb

At this point, I should be ready to install Win 7 on the 500gb, and have a properly formatted 1 tb with my old files and a clean, formatted 1 tb.

I have no experience with Linux, but it is my understanding that I can mount any/all disks in Linux in order to do the file management and transfer that I need to do.

A few last thoughts...the Mac was the only only I had owned since my Apple IIc so I'm not a stranger to Windows by any means. That is to say, I'm not an overly ignorant mac user jumping in over his head. However, I have not used Windows 7 at all.

So...any thoughts?

1. Can Linux do what I think it can?
2. Is this a good idea for a workflow?
3. Do I even need Linux to do this?

Thanks for any help.

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a b $ Windows 7
a b 5 Linux
December 31, 2009 9:05:23 PM
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1. Yes Linux can do this, but I'm not sure whether any of the standard Live CDs contain the necessary modules to read Mac partitioned disks and HFS+ file systems.
2. Workflow sounds fine. It's not a particularly complicated operation.
3. You can do this purely in Windows using HFSExplorer. But of course you need an installed Windows to run this. (On the other hand, you may need an installed Linux to run your solution.) You could always use GParted Live to resize the partitions on one of your 1TB drives, move everything from the 500GB disk to that one, and then install Windows on the 500GB disk. Then you could use HFSExplorer to move the data from the Mac disks to Windows ones. (I hope that makes sense! Really it's your solution with GParted Live being your live Linux CD.)
December 31, 2009 9:14:23 PM

That all makes complete sense. I feel much more confident now...it all made sense in my head, just needed to make sure it made sense to someone else.

Thanks very much, and happy new year!
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a b 5 Linux
December 31, 2009 9:21:50 PM

Why don't you install Linux on one of your drives and dual boot? :) 

Linux is really fun to play with and can help rescue your other operating systems when they fail.

Good luck && happy *olidays :) 
a b $ Windows 7
a b 5 Linux
December 31, 2009 9:24:52 PM

linux_0 said:
Why don't you install Linux on one of your drives and dual boot? :) 

Linux is really fun to play with and can help rescue your other operating systems when they fail.

Good luck && happy *olidays :) 

I'd agree (and it need only take 20-30GB), but it's not a solution to the immediate problem. The data needs to be moved off the 500GB disk first so that it can be repartitioned as a Windows disk rather than a Mac one. Then the data from the other disks can be dealt with, and they also need repartitioning.
a b 5 Linux
December 31, 2009 9:38:27 PM

Linux can also be installed on a 4GB USB flash drive or SD card and virtually any other bootable device with enough space.

Specialized distros can be installed on even smaller media.

Most Live CDs allow you to install software onto the ramdisk, the only issue is it evaporates when you reboot.

Semper Fi :) 
!