Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Vista x64

Last response: in Windows Vista
Share
January 29, 2008 2:00:57 PM

I will soon upgrade to vista x64 from xp x86, and have some doubts about drivers. This may sound stupid, but does my 64 bit CPU from AMD have any drivers for Vista 64? I couldn't find any on their website. And also, are there any 64 drivers for the Creative Soundblasters?

On a side note, how would you rate vista 64? Is it stable/faster than 32 bit with more than 2 gig ram and a 64 bit cpu?

Thanks.

More about : vista x64

Best solution

a b \ Driver
January 30, 2008 1:46:19 PM

You're most likely getting no replies because there are already a lot of threads on the same subject... anyways:

You will not need any drivers for your Proc. Chipset drivers will be available from your Mobo's maker. Creative's newest drivers do support Vista 64, though check your model of soundcard first - They end of life'd a bunch of stuff. If your card is X-Fi, you should be good. If not, you would be well advised to make sure.

Speed~wise, Vista 64 - in and of itself - is snappier than the x86 version. Running 32 bit apps, it performs roughly the same as it's 32 bit counterpart. Recent driver improvements from nVidia and ATI have improved gaming performance and frame rates to near-parity with XP.

In my experience 64 is far more stable/resistant to OS~affecting errors. In the 6 months I've run it, nothing has crashed the OS itself. It has run every piece of software and hardware I've put on it just fine. Though I don't tempt fate by using old stuff.

On the more negative side from a casual user perspective, Vista 64 has a pathological hatred of unsigned/expired software. So if you like to play with shareware you'll need to give up your hobby, download an SDK so you can sign the stuff yourself (knowing that if you sign a piece of malware and it propagates itself, people in foul moods may come looking for you), or use another OS. You used to be able to disable that, but Microsoft removed the option a while back.


"Meh" stuff - Vista is very aggressive about using system resources. Your HDD will spend a lot of time churning while Vista indexes it's contents (for faster searching - the new search is very nice), and also caches in active memory the files needed to quickly start applications it thinks you may use. A lot of people don't seem to like this at all because they see the HDD working and see their RAM is filled a *lot* more than it ever was in XP. Again, in my experience, the extra work and caching slows initial start up since it's loading a lot more. But once up and running, commonly used apps start near instantly. The same applies to the search function: It normally brings up the files/apps I want faster than I can finish typing the name. (Yes, this means that I seldom bother navigating a path to get to something. *So* much easier just to type it's name)
Share
Related resources
January 30, 2008 4:12:53 PM

Scotteq said:
You're most likely getting no replies because there are already a lot of threads on the same subject... anyways:

You will not need any drivers for your Proc. Chipset drivers will be available from your Mobo's maker. Creative's newest drivers do support Vista 64, though check your model of soundcard first - They end of life'd a bunch of stuff. If your card is X-Fi, you should be good. If not, you would be well advised to make sure.

Speed~wise, Vista 64 - in and of itself - is snappier than the x86 version. Running 32 bit apps, it performs roughly the same as it's 32 bit counterpart. Recent driver improvements from nVidia and ATI have improved gaming performance and frame rates to near-parity with XP.

In my experience 64 is far more stable/resistant to OS~affecting errors. In the 6 months I've run it, nothing has crashed the OS itself. It has run every piece of software and hardware I've put on it just fine. Though I don't tempt fate by using old stuff.

On the more negative side from a casual user perspective, Vista 64 has a pathological hatred of unsigned/expired software. So if you like to play with shareware you'll need to give up your hobby, download an SDK so you can sign the stuff yourself (knowing that if you sign a piece of malware and it propagates itself, people in foul moods may come looking for you), or use another OS. You used to be able to disable that, but Microsoft removed the option a while back.


"Meh" stuff - Vista is very aggressive about using system resources. Your HDD will spend a lot of time churning while Vista indexes it's contents (for faster searching - the new search is very nice), and also caches in active memory the files needed to quickly start applications it thinks you may use. A lot of people don't seem to like this at all because they see the HDD working and see their RAM is filled a *lot* more than it ever was in XP. Again, in my experience, the extra work and caching slows initial start up since it's loading a lot more. But once up and running, commonly used apps start near instantly. The same applies to the search function: It normally brings up the files/apps I want faster than I can finish typing the name. (Yes, this means that I seldom bother navigating a path to get to something. *So* much easier just to type it's name)


So i can't install:
"AMD Dual-Core Optimizer - The AMD Dual-Core Optimizer can help improve some PC gaming video performance by compensating for those applications that bypass the Windows API for timing by directly using the RDTSC (Read Time Stamp Counter) instruction. Applications that rely on RDTSC do not benefit from the logic in the operating system to properly account for the affect of power management mechanisms on the rate at which a processor core's Time Stamp Counter (TSC) is incremented. The AMD Dual-Core Optimizer helps to correct the resulting video performance effects or other incorrect timing effects that these applications may experience on dual-core processor systems, by periodically adjusting the core time-stamp-counters, so that they are synchronized."

and

"AMD Athlon%u2122 64 X2 Dual Core Processor Driver for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 Version (x86 and x64 exe) 1.3.2.16 - Allows the system to automatically adjust the CPU speed, voltage and power combination that match the instantaneous user performance need. Download this Setup Installation program (EXE) to automatically update all the files necessary for installation. This package is recommended for users whom desire a graphical user interface for installation. This .EXE driver is a user friendly localized software installation of the driver designed for end-users. This driver supports AMD Athlon%u2122 64 X2 Dual Core processors on Windows XP SP2, Windows 2003 SP1 x84 and x64 Editions."

Found here http://www.amd.com/gb-uk/Processors/TechnicalResources/... , or does Vista not need these?

The reason i am going to buy Vista 64 bit is because XP 32 bit isn't functioning properly with 3 gigs of physical ram, and thought its better to get Vista 64 than XP 64 :)  . Actually, the one i am going to buy has both 32/64 bit included, so i can install both on separate hard disks if something doesn't work on 64. I didn't understand what you said about the signing stuff, if i understand correctly, drivers/apps need to be signed by Microsoft for you to install them?

Thank you for your reply.
Score
0
a b \ Driver
January 30, 2008 7:43:08 PM

You'll need to check with AMD or your Mobo maker whether they'll work with Vista 64 and your combination of Processor and Mobo. I've always had stuff from the Blue guys, so I don't know whether those apps will work.

Drivers are supposed to have a digital "Signature" indicating who created them. Vista looks for that and if there is none it will treat it as Malware and refuse to run it. It doesn't need to be Microsoft's signature. But it needs to be signed by someone. This is a common practice, and you will not have any problems with commercially available software. As I indicated, it's really only an issue if you like playing with shareware and freeware.
Score
0
April 8, 2008 10:49:55 PM

Hmm.....um, Scotteq, what is entailed in signing drivers manually?

Basically:

1.) What files are needed? Where can one attain them?

2.) What is the proceedure/instructions-syntax to do so

and

3.) What file types are supported i.e. can one sign .dll and .sys files?

I am gagging to find this out. :) 

B.T.W, please check your PM if you read this Scotteq.

...and sorry for reviving the thread.

r2rX :) 
Score
0
April 9, 2008 5:19:17 PM

Cheers very much. :) 

r2rX :) 
Score
0
!