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Advantages and disadvantages of ubuntu

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March 17, 2010 11:53:28 AM

Perhaps narrow the scope a little. We'd be here all day comparing them. Plus some are somewhat subjective. Advantages and disadvantages in what area; at what tasks?
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March 17, 2010 6:51:38 PM

I'd say Windows biggest advantage is familiarity; people already know it and how to use it.

People without much computer experience ("casual users") might feel at home with either Windows, Linux or Mac OSX. But people with more experience may have 10 years of Windows knowledge and 0 years of Linux knowledge.

The biggest advantage of Linux, for me, is to keep my system tidy and secure. With Windows, everything basically gets a mess. You install Application A which writes .dll files with some version in the Windows directory, then you install Application B which overwrites these dlls with newer versions, and Application A doesn't work anymore. So basically, everything affects eachother and keeping a tidy system is quite hard.
With Ubuntu Linux and Mac OSX, that problem is less severe.

I especially like the way i can run Windows applications on Linux. By keeping a separate wine directory for each application; one application cannot affect the other. It also makes applications behave the same way even on different systems. For example, i can mount my C&C game directory from PC1 and play C&C. Then i mount the same directory on PC2 and it also works. So, its both more portable, endurable and safer; as the Windows app only has access to its own stuff.

Also, with Ubuntu you get an OS update every six months; and its improving on a wide range of fronts. With Windows, you can take multiple years before a new version is released, and not every new version is an improvement. Though i generally feel Windows 7 is a good upgrade to those who still prefer XP over Vista. It appears the biggest innovations don't come from Microsoft.

Eventually, the Operating System will become much more advanced; in that case i feel open source development will yield a better product than a closed source development team would be able to produce. While closed-source/commercial software generally spent more time on analysing how casual users use their system, i'm genuinely impressed by the way the Ubuntu Project deals with user feedback. Just browsing through the Ubuntu Brainstorms is very inspiring, and also means the user has influence in how the OS is developed and make crucial design decisions that affects user experience. You don't have to be a techy to participate in Ubuntu.

Seeing that Ubuntu made it to the world's most popular Linux distro, while they started in only 2004 i belive. You can see it's evolving at a much faster rate than Microsoft does with their Windows OS. Many cool things in Windows were killed-off because they couldn't make it work well in time. For example the WinFS filesystem would be revolutionary, and Microsoft could have exited the .dll-hell by making .NET more integral.

Windows 7, when looking at user interface, is not so different from Windows XP. The biggest visual change in Vista - the Sidebar - have already been removed in Windows 7. In other words - i can see no radical new design or technology that affects user interface. Sure there are a lot of changes under-the-hood that makes Windows 7 a better choice than XP.

So i'm not too optimistic for Microsoft to keep Windows a success. It might be going like it's going with IE - as soon as there is a good alternative people will switch over and Microsoft will not be absolutely dominant in market share. Linux still has to demonstrate just about any user can use this instead of Windows. If Linux is a viable alternative and matured a bit, things can go pretty fast. A browser is free, but an OS is not. If people can do everything they can do on Windows, with comparable effort or convenicence, they might opt for the cheaper Linux option instead when they choose to buy their new computer.

The most important change here is that you'll have a choice in the future, more so than now. There will be no more one universal system, just as IE as 'universal browser' is no longer.
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March 17, 2010 11:41:03 PM

Ever installed multiple programs on Windows which all add their own copy of MS Visual C++ 2005 redistributable? Wow is that annoying. I end up with half of the software in Add/Remove Programs being duplicates. The lack of a package manager is no excuse for this; the installer should check for an existing redist before installing one.

As for the 6 month release cycle, it's a double-edged sword. Sure, the OS looks and feels different every 6 months, but sticking to such a short life cycle for each version means some sacrifices to quality and features are made and bugs need to be ironed out over the next few months. A 12 month release cycle would probably mean that each version is more polished out of the box. Rolling releases are also interesting, although they don't give you that "WOW a new version!" rush every six months ;) 
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April 11, 2010 11:50:00 PM

As for release cycle I think Ubuntu did it right. They have LTS (long term support) which you may call the Microsoft equivalent - it is a more stable and polished system that is released every couple of years or so. If you don't like the idea of a new version every six months (like many Windows users don't - it's just too much changing around) you get the LTS and be happy for years to come. Now if you want every new feature as fast as possible you have the six months release cycle.
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a b $ Windows 7
April 12, 2010 4:59:54 AM

Biggest advantage for me:
easier to compile latest programs from source. For example I can always build latest ffmpeg//ffms2+x264 very easily. Also x264 runs 10-15% faster in linux than in windows.

Also ubuntu is a good choice, because its built on debian! My only beef with ubuntu is that hardware devs seem to revolve around ubuntu which occasionally uses depreciated packages. (read ATI drivers and ubuntu still only supporting xserver 7.4). On the other hand you know your system wont randomly break due to a newly introduced bug like in debian 'unstable'
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April 20, 2010 10:04:42 PM

Here is a link that breaks down all the major distributions of Linux. Also keep in mind for your interest in Ubuntu that Mint is a close spin-off of Ubuntu. I like to call them "sibling distributions".

http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
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a b $ Windows 7
April 20, 2010 11:24:42 PM

if mint is a sibling, debian is the great grandfather... AND HE'S STILL LIVING!
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April 30, 2010 6:39:26 AM

I only have experience with Ubuntu linux, Windows 98, XP and windows 7 so far.
I like Ubuntu. The customization is better than windows. It is a lot easier to manage program installations in Linux.
Games are no longer an advantage for windows in my opinion, because of DRM.
I'd rather get a book and create my own original game on Linux.
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May 1, 2010 6:32:59 AM

Windows' main advantage has been games. Now that Steam is supposedly being ported to Linux, it's just a matter of time until it supports the majority of popular games. Quite a large number of games run quite well with Wine and similar programs as it is. Although viruses do exist, Linux is much more secure than Windows (in my opinion). While there are issues that do exist, most of them can be resolved with a little work. :) 
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May 1, 2010 6:44:28 AM

Wine brings with it the vulnerabilities of Windows (well, at least some of them). A native Linux client and games would make Wine almost completely redundant as most other programs can be run in a virtualised Windows environment with far better compatibility. But a native Steam client != native Linux games, so let's keep things in perspective. Valve will likely port it's major games to Linux, but I doubt the other major publishers will follow suit for a long time yet.
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May 1, 2010 8:56:27 AM

randomizer said:
Wine brings with it the vulnerabilities of Windows (well, at least some of them). A native Linux client and games would make Wine almost completely redundant as most other programs can be run in a virtualised Windows environment with far better compatibility. But a native Steam client != native Linux games, so let's keep things in perspective. Valve will likely port it's major games to Linux, but I doubt the other major publishers will follow suit for a long time yet.


Yeah, that is true, but at least it's a bit of a push in the right direction. It'll start with a few of Valve's major titles, and then I"m sure game makers will begin to follow suit. I'm not expecting it to happen over night, but with time will come progress :) 
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May 1, 2010 9:08:36 AM

SecuROM needs to work on Linux before EA and Ubisoft publish titles on the platform.
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May 1, 2010 5:26:54 PM

randomizer said:
SecuROM needs to work on Linux before EA and Ubisoft publish titles on the platform.


I'd prefer they just dropped it instead :p 
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May 1, 2010 10:06:25 PM

Same here :) 
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May 2, 2010 4:55:34 AM

So would we all but we all know that isn't going to happen.
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May 2, 2010 7:03:17 PM

randomizer said:
So would we all but we all know that isn't going to happen.


We can be blindly hopeful can't we? :pt1cable: 
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May 5, 2010 12:45:54 AM

Windows can keep all its games. Keep SecuROM, steam and all the rest away.

I'm running Windows 7 and Linux in dual boot, so games on Linux aren't a big deal for me.

I actually prefer the current way things
are, because i can get more work done on Linux(without the distraction of games and DRM).
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May 5, 2010 12:50:26 AM

pleasenoname said:
Windows can keep all its games. Keep SecuROM, steam and all the rest away.

I'm running Windows 7 and Linux in dual boot, so games on Linux aren't a big deal for me.

I actually prefer the current way things
are, because i can get more work done on Linux(without the distraction of games and DRM).


I guess that's a good view to have. I've been considering doing the same lately. We will see :lol: 
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January 10, 2012 10:17:39 AM

This topic has been closed by Amdfangirl
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