Anyone make their own DVR with a HDTV PC card? You know re..

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Ive seen a few cards that can get unscrambled signals from cable but
with non-HDTV obviously you can anything broadcast on cable to record
in a TV tuner card etc as long as your cable box unscrambles it and
you hook up a cable from it to your card input.

Can you do this with ANY Hdtv card as long as both the cable box has
the proper out and the TV card has a proper input? And what would
that connection be ? HDMI ? And do any cable boxes you can get from
TIME WARNER etc had such an output? And do the cards have such an
input?
4 answers Last reply
More about anyone make hdtv card
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "John@Smith.com" <xxxxspud@newscene.com> wrote in message
    news:ourks01l35id4f227pdq5tb37picthg78n@4ax.com...
    > Ive seen a few cards that can get unscrambled signals from cable but
    > with non-HDTV obviously you can anything broadcast on cable to record
    > in a TV tuner card etc as long as your cable box unscrambles it and
    > you hook up a cable from it to your card input.
    >
    > Can you do this with ANY Hdtv card as long as both the cable box has
    > the proper out and the TV card has a proper input? And what would
    > that connection be ? HDMI ? And do any cable boxes you can get from
    > TIME WARNER etc had such an output? And do the cards have such an
    > input?

    Short answer: No.

    Long Answer: Non-HDTV cards can tune to an analog signal generated by the
    cable box through either composite video or RF (channel 3 or 4). This is a
    low tech capability from the cable box.

    HDTV cable boxes do not output HD pictures in the same format that HDTV
    cards can use. The output is either uncompressed raw video (component video)
    or DVI/HDMI, which is a digital format that none of the current batch of
    HDTV cards can accept as inputs. The reason is more political than
    technical. If this was possible, perfect digital copies of HDTV content
    could be made. They don't want you to be able to do this. This could change
    some day, but AFAIK no one offers this today.

    You might say, why can't someone create a card that converts the raw
    umcompressed component video into a digital OTA format that an HD card can
    receive? The answer is this is not a simple conversion. You need very high
    end equipment that is not ready for consumer use (i.e. it is very
    expensive). You are essentially creating a mini ATSC broadcast studio. Not
    as simple as the SDTV cable box conversion.

    Brad Houser
    <not speaking for Intel>
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "Brad Houser" <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote in
    news:cqetce$907$1@news01.intel.com:

    >
    > "John@Smith.com" <xxxxspud@newscene.com> wrote in message
    > news:ourks01l35id4f227pdq5tb37picthg78n@4ax.com...
    >> Ive seen a few cards that can get unscrambled signals from cable but
    >> with non-HDTV obviously you can anything broadcast on cable to record
    >> in a TV tuner card etc as long as your cable box unscrambles it and
    >> you hook up a cable from it to your card input.
    >>
    >> Can you do this with ANY Hdtv card as long as both the cable box has
    >> the proper out and the TV card has a proper input? And what would
    >> that connection be ? HDMI ? And do any cable boxes you can get from
    >> TIME WARNER etc had such an output? And do the cards have such an
    >> input?
    >
    > Short answer: No.
    >
    > Long Answer: Non-HDTV cards can tune to an analog signal generated by
    > the cable box through either composite video or RF (channel 3 or 4).
    > This is a low tech capability from the cable box.
    >
    > HDTV cable boxes do not output HD pictures in the same format that
    > HDTV cards can use. The output is either uncompressed raw video
    > (component video) or DVI/HDMI, which is a digital format that none of
    > the current batch of HDTV cards can accept as inputs. The reason is
    > more political than technical. If this was possible, perfect digital
    > copies of HDTV content could be made. They don't want you to be able
    > to do this. This could change some day, but AFAIK no one offers this
    > today.
    >
    > You might say, why can't someone create a card that converts the raw
    > umcompressed component video into a digital OTA format that an HD card
    > can receive? The answer is this is not a simple conversion. You need
    > very high end equipment that is not ready for consumer use (i.e. it is
    > very expensive). You are essentially creating a mini ATSC broadcast
    > studio. Not as simple as the SDTV cable box conversion.

    Give Hauppauge a couple of years and they will do it. It's really no
    harder than hooking three bt878 chips in parallel and souping them up in
    speed to handle 1080i resolution.

    --
    Dave Oldridge+
    ICQ 1800667

    A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    > HDTV cable boxes do not output HD pictures in the same format that HDTV
    > cards can use. The output is either uncompressed raw video (component
    video)
    > or DVI/HDMI ...

    Some cable and satellite set top boxes now support IEEE-1394 which is
    capable
    of carrying the original compressed bitstream from the STB to a DVR. In
    fact,
    federal law now allows any cable consumer to demand a cable STB with a
    IEEE-1394
    port from their cable MSO. In www.avsforum.com is discussion on how to do
    this.

    One gottcha however. Copy and redistribution flags are finally starting to
    be utilized in
    terrestrial, cable and satellite broadcasts, and if a show is flagged for
    protection, it
    forces DTCP copy protection to be applied to IEEE-1394 outputs (fyi - and
    HDCP
    copy protection to be applied to DVI and HDMI outputs), which means the
    device
    on the other end of the wire must be DTCP capable and compliant. Some DVRs
    on
    the market are, but I am not aware of any DTCP compliant setups for PCs, as
    PCs
    are generally considered hackable and unsecure.

    > They don't want you to be able to do this.

    Content providers and broadcasters are generally supportive of traditional
    NTSC VCR
    like activity, even with digital content. "Traditional" means its a personal
    copy that stays
    within the home. What content providers and broadcasters are struggling with
    is having
    personal copies float out the front door, over the internet, and so on.
    Just last week I
    downloaded BitTorrent to see what all the rage was about, and in a matter of
    hours,
    had tracked down the entire lineups of Seinfeld, Star Trek and a zillion
    other shows,
    many in high def, most in pristine original-digital form.

    Again, you can buy High-Def VCR and DVR devices today that are IEEE-1394
    with
    DTCP compliant, and you can hook them to the newer terrestrial, cable and
    satellite
    STBs that support IEEE-1394 with DTCP. Its a controlled ecosystem that
    doesn't
    generally permit PCs.

    Thomas Gilg
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 22:34:40 GMT, "news.cup.hp.com"
    <thomasDELME_gilgDELME@hpDELME.com> wrote:


    >
    >Content providers and broadcasters are generally supportive of traditional
    >NTSC VCR
    >like activity, even with digital content. "Traditional" means its a personal
    >copy that stays
    >within the home. What content providers and broadcasters are struggling with
    >is having
    >personal copies float out the front door, over the internet, and so on.
    >Just last week I
    >downloaded BitTorrent to see what all the rage was about, and in a matter of
    >hours,
    >had tracked down the entire lineups of Seinfeld, Star Trek and a zillion
    >other shows,
    >many in high def, most in pristine original-digital form.
    >

    It's been my experience with VCRs over the last 20 years, that
    collecting is just going to end up a major storage problem for you. On
    top of that the replay value is rather minimal in retrospect.

    I think services like Netflix are a reasonable way to get access to
    stuff you want to see without having to find, download, burn, and
    warehouse the stuff.

    I wouldn't want to waste my time burning every episode of Star Trek ;)
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