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Best Linux Distro

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  • Distribution
  • Linux
Last response: in Open Source Software
July 14, 2010 5:22:41 AM

I am looking for a Linux system for my desktop.

I want it to be very compatible and stable because I had stability issues with Vista.

I want pretty simple and as Windows "like" as possible.

My computer has a tendency to freeze, so again I want something very stable.

955 Phenom 3.2 GHz
4 GB DDR3 1333 MHz RAM
4890 Video card XFX Radeon 1GB

More about : linux distro

a c 138 5 Linux
July 14, 2010 7:56:26 AM

"windows like" doesnt exist. Linux is unixy by definition.

That being said, if stability is your main concern look at debian "stable".
For something easier, maybe check out ubuntu, or one of its derivatives.

Also sorry to hear you have an ATI card, drivers for ATI cards kind of suck :( 
July 14, 2010 5:05:15 PM

What I mean by windows is just a windows like interface. I sent this question using Ubuntu 10.04. I am just looking for a something a bit different now. I am burning OpenSUSE right now to try that out. I will also probably try Debian too because I have heard good things.
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a b 5 Linux
July 14, 2010 5:55:34 PM

The one thing you have to understand when making the switch is that Linux is not Windows. Don't expect it to be, and you'll be successful in using it.

I'd stick with Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, OpenSUSE, Debian, etc. The more popular distributions generally offer better compatibility, and better stability. Pretty much any distro you pick will be faster and more stable than Vista ;) 
July 14, 2010 6:01:54 PM

skittle said:
That being said, if stability is your main concern look at debian "stable".


If stability is the main concern I'd go for Red Hat or one of its derivatives; but then you lose on compatibility and installed packages.

I would agree that Debian stable is probably the best compromise between stability and software availability... Ubuntu is more up to date, but it also has a lot more bugs as a result.
a b 5 Linux
July 14, 2010 7:34:22 PM

I'd second that :) 

Red Hat is pretty gosh darn stable, so's Debian.

Fedora and ubuntu are the cutting edge versions of Red Hat and Debian respectively and they're a lot more likely to support the latest and greatest hardware and software but sometimes that's at the expense of application stability. The kernel itself is quite stable as long as the hardware's stable.

Good luck :) 
July 15, 2010 7:15:38 AM

When it comes to stability, i find Slackware as the best.. Surely its too centric around the unix philosophy making it unfit for newbies but if one needs to understand unix, Slackware is the OS to prefer..
a b 5 Linux
July 15, 2010 8:14:04 AM

At the risk of seeming heretical, if you want to understand UNIX then go for UNIX - FreeBSD (or OpenSolaris if you must).
a b 5 Linux
July 16, 2010 10:29:23 AM

kyleplum said:
What I mean by windows is just a windows like interface. I sent this question using Ubuntu 10.04. I am just looking for a something a bit different now. I am burning OpenSUSE right now to try that out. I will also probably try Debian too because I have heard good things.


Do we agree that KDE is the most like Windows?

Hmm, matey, I Linux is a bit cool in the fact you can go with any linux and change the GUI. Fedora and Ubuntu can have the same UI, so can Mint and Red Hat.
July 16, 2010 1:49:56 PM

I think before making any changes in your pc to do the following

Dowload some distro, I would recomend ubuntu, kubuntu, fedora, mandriva, openSuse and Debian and specially linux mint. You can look for their kde or gnome versions. Mint would be ok for your windows-like-ui requirement

Install virtual box install some distros and try them there. In this way you will become familiar with the installation process (belive me not all of them are graphical 7 steps), and you can explore the surroundings, install things, become familiar with them.

If you have found the right one for you, and if you do not want to give up windows, you can consider dual booting. Nevertheless, you must backup your data, find specific instructions and go for it.

a b 5 Linux
July 16, 2010 8:15:29 PM

I think that'd be the best route as well. VirtualBox is fantastic for finding a distro that you like. List of candidates:

Ubuntu/Kubuntu
Fedora
Mandrive
Mint
openSUSE
Debain

To start with ;) 
July 17, 2010 1:47:04 AM

One place you can start is www.distrowatch.com. You can fin all the relevant information on linux distros as well as particular information, reviews, etc... really worth checking. Also, as someone told you before, do not think that linux behaves like windows, no sir. You have a lot of differences, for instance

a) Installing apps (forget *.exe!!)
b) Managing files and apps (where is c:?)
c) Connecting to the net (in fixed ip's could be a little bit of trouble if you expect a windows like behavior)
d) Drivers

to mention a few, so after you choose a distro, it is also a must to have information about how your particular distro handles all of the above.

Cheers

Antropoid
a b 5 Linux
July 17, 2010 2:26:31 AM

Distrowatch is awesome, good suggestion antropoid :)  Another difference, the Terminal is actually useful in Linux :D 
a b 5 Linux
July 17, 2010 12:14:05 PM

Obviously never played with windows power shell have we... It will blow your mind compared to a standard Bash shell.
a b 5 Linux
July 17, 2010 2:43:14 PM

Wrong forum but, yes, power shell is pretty cool.
a b 5 Linux
July 17, 2010 6:51:23 PM

audiovoodoo said:
Obviously never played with windows power shell have we... It will blow your mind compared to a standard Bash shell.


I have not. I'll have to look into that :p 
July 18, 2010 3:54:46 PM

most like windows i would say that would be either Kubuntu or Fedora

IMO best distro ever is Arch linux (as by the title), but you don't want to delve down that path unless you actually want to learn how it works and use the terminal (you don't get a GUI, you have to choose and install one)
a c 138 5 Linux
July 18, 2010 6:20:33 PM

arch is nice, but be prepared to spend a long time getting everything configured, and once you have, be prepared to spend time figuring out why random things dont work the way you expect them to!
July 18, 2010 6:29:20 PM

that's why i said only to grab it if you want to learn how linux is setup and configured as opposed to just working (in a manor of speaking)

for a new person *buntu and Fedora are good places to start