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Software for Vista x64

Last response: in Windows Vista
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April 9, 2008 11:05:53 AM

Hi,

I started using Vista 64-bit yesterday. Installed 64-bit drivers. Will installing my old 32-bit software slowdown my system? Without any software I feel 64-bit is slightly faster than 32-bit(May be my imagination....)

More about : software vista x64

a b \ Driver
April 9, 2008 12:51:36 PM

Vista 64 includes the libraries needed to run 32 bit code. And if you look in your computer, you will see there are two sets of folders for your programs. An X64 one for 64 bit programs, and an x86 one for your 32 bit ones. This requires NO action on your part - Vista will put the appropriate programs in the appropriate places for you.

Vista handles the translation for you. There is some overhead, but this is balanced by the fact that many common 32 bit instructions can be/are grouped to run in pairs. The caveat being that there has to be enough room in the 64 bit string to include the tags necessary to differentiate the two. In practice, you won't notice this either.

My recommendation is simply to install our stuff and don't worry about it.
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a b \ Driver
April 9, 2008 8:51:21 PM

I downloaded an important software we use in business and installed it on my personal machine yesterday (VISTA 64). System requirements/recommendations for the program included Windows XP/2000, no mention of VISTA. With that, I expected perhaps some measure of incompatibility. None, runs fine. Agree with Scotteq, install your software with confidence. Office 2000 Small Business runs flawlessly installed on VISTA 64. I got that software package with a Gateway 450. Also came with Windows 98 and 450MHz processor. Had the latest technology. A DVD ROM.
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April 10, 2008 3:09:48 AM

Thank you very much people. I guess it's better to install 64-bit versions but it's not a must...Thanks again.
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April 12, 2008 2:32:09 AM

I have another questions. I installed some 32-bit software which I used previously. Some had some minor compatibility issues but overall system works fine. But what about RAM utilization. Will my 32-bit games fully utilize my 4GB RAM (Crysis, COD4 etc.)
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April 12, 2008 2:48:49 AM

Scotteq -

That's what the x86 folder is for, for 32-bit software? I've just been putting it all in the regular program files folder. What's the difference, does it affect anything? Its hard to imagine it would....
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April 12, 2008 3:55:57 AM

Yes. x86 folder is for 32-bit stuff. But the problem is will they able to use all the RAM available because they are 32-bit. 32-bit software works fine under 64-bit Windows. But upgrading RAM will be useless if they are not utilized as we expect them to be.
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a b \ Driver
April 13, 2008 12:15:26 PM

dashbarron said:
err...huh?


I think he's referring to individual 32 bit programs potentially not being able to take advantage of all of the RAM available in a pumped up 64 bit OS.

To that, I say: Maybe so. But they VERY well will be able to get all they *can* use.
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April 14, 2008 5:14:48 PM

dashbarron said:
Scotteq -

That's what the x86 folder is for, for 32-bit software? I've just been putting it all in the regular program files folder. What's the difference, does it affect anything? Its hard to imagine it would....



vista64 will automatically install 64bit software into the "Program Files" folder, and all 32bit software into the "Program Files x86" folder, you don't have to worry about selecting the proper folder
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April 16, 2008 3:41:00 AM

I see that, but I didnt know what the difference was.

But why does it matter if they're installed in one or the other? - Isn't there usually a 2GB cap or so on most games anywho? I heard like Photoshop allows you to increase the limit or such in the newest revision.
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a b \ Driver
April 16, 2008 12:21:05 PM

That cap you refer to is a 32 bit limitation. It does not exist in 64 bit programs/operating systems.

32 bit programs get installed to their own folder because they need to be handled differently by Vista 64 than a native 64 bit program. From a user perspective this is transparent: You double click the icon on your desktop and the thing launches irregardless of which folder it lives it, or whether it's 32 bit or 64 bit.
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April 17, 2008 10:45:56 PM

I Run Crysis on 64bit vista. It is about 10-12% faster on 64bit version over 32 bit. I have 8gb ram but have never seen crysis take more than about 1.5gb memory. I don;t believe there are many programs that are written to utilize all that memory avaible in Vista 64. You can however multi task very well with all that addition memory.
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