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Which linux distro on new ASUS 1215N?

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September 14, 2010 5:49:31 PM

Hey all,

After much googling, I couldn't find much info on what distros people have got successfully working on an ASUS 1215N.

I have mine coming tomorrow and want a heads up, on which distos should work straight out of the box. I plan on dual booting my new machine so, I'm not to bothered if when I boot into linux the ION2 is always on - I don't think optimus is supported in linux yet? My biggest concern, as a linux novice is whether the wifi and lan drivers will work straight out of the box, on my older laptop running linux mint 9 the internet worked fine, however when using kde I couldn't get it too work and this is a problem I am afraid of facing again. I have read that ubuntu has had wifi driver issues with the 1215n, so I just wondered if this has been solved? I really like linux mint, and am also looking at jolicloud, I have seen jolicloud supports ION, but not sure about ION2 support. Any other suggestions are welcome :-)

Another question I have, is that I plan to install a distro on the free space of the windows partition (I think this is what happens when you go through the install menu, and install side by side but not sure if my description is accurate for what i mean.) I have read a useful guide on lifehacker, saying to have 3 partitions one for windows, one for linux and one for data which is accessible to both operating systems. In all honesty, I just want a seperate windows partition and a seperate linux partition. However, I just wondered if the two partitions are able to interact with eachother? because I don't really want them too... for example, if I set the two operating systems up on seperate partitions on the same hard disk, and I accidently downloaded a windows virus whilst using the linux os, if I then booted into windows would the file be able to execute on the windows partition or would it be contained within the linux partition?

Sorry for the long post and nooby questions, have never really done dual-booting :-)

Thanks in advance Rob
a b 5 Linux
September 15, 2010 12:03:36 AM

Generally using one of the most popular distributions will ensure compatibility. I'd try out Ubuntu and/or Fedora personally. Might also want to look into Mint, Mandriva, PCLinuxOS, etc., but I'm not sure how compatible they'll be.

Windows can't even read the EXT format, so you won't have any issues with that. As far as Windows is concerned, your Linux installation won't even exist. Linux will be able to see your Windows partition if you wish though :) 

There are plenty of guides online explaining how to install two OS's, if you're not sure how. A quick Google search yields near infinite results.

Good luck. :) 
September 15, 2010 12:57:15 PM

Hey,

Thanks for the reply, I think I read about some issues with ubuntu on my particular model of netbook. I just realised though, that I could spend some time trying the live CD's and see if networking will work and then go from there :-)

Brilliant about windows not being able to read linux, I think my biggest concern about netbooks in general is the lack of a CD drive, so if anything did go wrong on windows then really you're in trouble. Obviously it can be solved with an external CD drive, but it is a bit more hassle than a notebook/desktop.

So basically windows can't read the linux harddrive format, and wouldn't be able to read, for example a virus written for windows that is saved on the linux partition?

Thanks again for the reply, Rob
Related resources
a b 5 Linux
September 15, 2010 1:49:42 PM

Windows viruses won't affect your Linux installation in any way anyways, so you really have nothing to worry about :) 
a b 5 Linux
September 15, 2010 7:23:59 PM

I'm almost reluctant to post this as it might confuse people, but for completeness

Windows can be made to read Linux file formats using drivers, this allows you to then see all your Linux drives if you so choose. It's just not native support out of the box.

Whilst a Windows virus will not execute on Linux it is quite possible to download an infected file and have it sat on your linux hard disk. If you then opened that file in Windows you could infect that system, be that via copying to a pen drive, running over a network or using a driver to read a linux disk under Windows.

Don't forget that while Viri are an issue it's scripting attacks that are really on the rise. Many of the vulnerabilities of Firefox are just the same on Linux. It's better but it's no silver bullet.

Please don't anybody use this as an excuse not to play, in essence the previous posts are all very much correct, but as always with these things 'in general' is a good phrase to have in mind.
September 23, 2010 11:50:02 AM

Hello,

is there in the meantime some experience with installing an ubuntu or another linux on the 1215n?

I dont have the 1215n, yet. Is there a possibility to turn the ion2 on in general, in kind of a bios function?
The worst case would be when the linux would not be able to use any graphics adapter or only the build-in intel.

Thanks,
Matthias
a b 5 Linux
September 23, 2010 1:49:19 PM

I don't have an experience with that particular model personally, but Nvidia tends to have excellent Linux support in terms of drivers. I see no reason why there wouldn't be a driver available for that particular graphics chipset.

EDIT: This driver is compatible with the ION. Doesn't make any mention of the ION2, but it should still work in theory :) 
32-bit: http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux-display-ia32-256.53-...
64-bit: http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux-display-amd64-256.53...
September 30, 2010 5:22:45 AM

Optimus was introduced with the ION2 and that is what switches between the dedicated and integrated graphics. With the dedicated always "on" it will drain the battery much faster.

The 1215N also (from what I have read) has USB 3.0 on it. How are those drivers going for linux?
October 15, 2010 2:16:22 AM

Hello,

I've got the Asus 1215n and I've been struggling with this for quite some time. I love it to death, but on the Ubuntu side it just drains my battery twice as fast (I dual boot it and windows). This is a problem for me - I really want/need to get as much battery life as possible. Could anyone tell me if there is any way to turn this off (and on), at least manually, so that I can get extended battery life? I just updated to Ubuntu 10.10 hoping it would help. Now I can switch to the "power saving GPU" but I don't think that's the same thing. I'm kind of a novice, so go easy on me.
October 17, 2010 9:01:02 AM

Hi TheBrinos, :hello: 
A part of the battery issue and GPU, could you tell me more about the rest? which distro? does everything work? Camera with skype, audio, wifi etc?

Thank you...

Alessandro happy new owner of a 1215n that would like to make it dual boot (like all the pcs I have/had)
Anonymous
November 10, 2010 12:42:00 PM

About dissabling the NVIDIA, yes, it is possible, it was discovered just recently (2... 3 weeks ago) on the hybrid linux mailing list, it uses a modified acpi, the good news end here, no optimus support for now :)  You have to learn to live with the integrated intel graphics (witch is not bad at all, you can see 720p movies with that without any struggle, and have CompizFussion working fast, and without consuming the battery a lot).

If you don't disable the NVIDIA gpu it will be wasting energy without interfering with performance (it is still impossible to use the GPU even for CUDA on linux thanks to Nvidia Optimus..) and will get very hot...
January 28, 2011 3:19:48 PM

Don't work in ubuntu 10.10, The sound is cursed with a hiss and the video don't work if you use the xorg.conf that the nvidia make.
I'm really pissed this.
a b 5 Linux
January 28, 2011 6:57:26 PM

ikeluiz said:
Don't work in ubuntu 10.10, The sound is cursed with a hiss and the video don't work if you use the xorg.conf that the nvidia make.
I'm really pissed this.


I've had absolutely zero issues with 10.10. Something must be configured wrong for you, or you just have some bad hardware.
a b 5 Linux
January 29, 2011 3:20:11 AM

schrom said:
Hello,

is there in the meantime some experience with installing an ubuntu or another linux on the 1215n?. . . Thanks, Matthias

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Begin by downloading an early version (1.3.5) of SystemRescueCD at sourceforge (http://sourceforge.net/projects/systemrescuecd/files/sy...)

Next, get UNetbootin from the same source (http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/). Then make a bootable small USB Flash Drive using UNetbootin and the sysresccd-x86-1.3.5 ISO file, both just downloaded.

Set your system BIOS to boot to USB first, then boot to your new System Rescue CD USB stick.

After it boots, SysRescCD wants you to hit defaults (hit Enter) a couple times. When you end up at the multi-colored prompt on the page asking user to enter either "startx" or "wizard," type in the following command

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=4096 conv=notrunc,sync

This will destroy all trace of any Windows File System, wiping your entire hard drive with zeros. It will take a while, depending on the size of your hard drive, so go make a sandwich or something. When it's done, you'll see some statistics after a statement that there is no "more space on drive" and the size of your hard drive.

Don't bail out yet!

At the same prompt, type in the desired "startx" and Enter
This brings up the XFCE mouse then a yellow-colored terminal.
In the yellow-colored terminal, type the command "gparted".

Partition your hard drive. If you don't know how, use the Slackware basic strategy of
one partition for root ( / ) -- 10GB (or to copy DVDs use 15GB), use ext4 file system;
one partition for swap -- one gig should do; and
one partition for /home -- most or all of the remainder
(keep some unallocated should you desire to expand one or add a partition later).

NOTES: 1) in the OS install, when partition dialog pops up, choose Manual and then either Edit or Modify for each partition created previously with gparted, telling it to yes, use the partition, format it using ext4 file system for / and /home; swap should be okay. [So, write down how you partition, noting /dev/sda1 or sda2 or sda3, size, label (if any), and file system (ext4)]; 2) a person could also download the ISO file and burn it to a CD, but if no CD burner, do as above.

It's easy. When done partitioning, simply enter the command "init 6" in the yellow terminal window and reboot follows.

Use UNetbootin to make the ISO bootable on another USB stick (for a total of three unless one is reused) and install something like the Fedora-14-LXDE spin (or ven the XFCE spin, with your system specs). Get it here: http://spins.fedoraproject.org/lxde/
January 29, 2011 9:03:12 PM

Side note: Look at Meego, Its built to be 100% compatible for Asus eee systems :) 
January 30, 2011 11:37:12 AM

hey,
There's a much easier way - Using Windows, from within unetbootin, download and make any image (iso) file, e.g. a distro, bootable. Follow unetbootin instructions. The advantege over other methods (including Ubuntu's own) is that you still can use your pendrive as storage as usual. On restart, disable Boot Booster first (press <F2> repeteadly on bootup). Then you should recover the POST. Make USB stick the first bootable drive, save and restart pressing <F10>. Presto, you are able to use a Live CD, install Ubuntu or any other distro, whatever. From liveCD you easily install Ubuntu, alone or as dual-boot, just click "install" and follow the instructions. You have to be careful if dealing with manual partiitioning (gparted is awesome...)
February 7, 2011 3:10:48 AM

For the record - do NOT enable the proprietary drivers for Nvidia. It will fail to boot properly.

The current (Version 260.19.36) through to beta (270.18) Linux drivers all have this problem with the Asus 1215N.

The Nvidia site explains why:

Note that the list of supported GPU products is provided to indicate which GPUs are supported by a particular driver version. Some designs incorporating supported GPUs may not be compatible with the NVIDIA Linux driver: in particular, notebook and all-in-one desktop designs with switchable (hybrid) or Optimus graphics will not work if means to disable the integrated graphics in hardware are not available. Hardware designs will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, so please consult with a system's manufacturer to determine whether that particular system is compatible.

Personally I am really annoyed about this. I am using dual boot into Ubuntu 10.10 but as others have stated the battery life is terrible in Ubuntu because of this.

Asus really need to assist the community and fix this problem.

Also - FYI, another problem with the 1215N - you can no longer replace the HDD without voiding your warranty! Unless you buy an Asus HDD and get them to install it. B@stards.. </end rant>
February 11, 2011 11:40:00 PM

I have found this to be true. i tried to enable the nvidia driver and got a black screen and lock up. The only issue that is keeping me from deleting my windoze partition and using Ubuntu exclusively is the laptop lid/suspend/hibernate issue. I have not been able to get this to work. Any ideas? Oh, almost forgot to mention. I am using a VX6 (the cousin of the 1215n). these are basically the same machine. Also, I used the standard Ubuntu 10 for installation and not the netbook edition.

February 19, 2011 3:11:38 PM

CsG_kieran_2 said:
Side note: Look at Meego, Its built to be 100% compatible for Asus eee systems :) 


I have tried Meego with minimal success. No Wlan or ethernet. Can't get online. If there is a workaround I would love to know. Nice OS overall but that is definitely enough to keep me from using it. I have Sabayon installed along side Windoze and Sabayon works nearly perfectly. The main issue with most linux and the 1215n or the VX6 is the suspend with lid close feature and/or hibernate. have not been able to get this to work on any distro. Also, Puppy linux has a few eeePC distros that are quite nice.
February 20, 2011 2:06:43 AM

Just tested the latest Knoppix. everything but Nvidia Optimus works...even suspend and hibernate! All we need is the hybrid graphics working.
February 20, 2011 10:36:31 AM

I got my 1215N a few days ago. I love it, it's even better than I thought.

I run my 1215N under Debian 6.0 (Squeeze). I left Windows on the machine so that I can boot it just in case something goes wrong (it already happened ;) . Debian runs smoothly, with LAN, WLAN, and sound working perfectly. I don't think that the 3D chip works, I didn't test it since I don't need it. However, installing and setting up Debian for 1215N is not for absolute beginners.

-Tim
February 21, 2011 9:08:17 AM

Don't you face issues with frequent load/unload cycles on the hard drive ?
Mine keep clicking all the time and smartctl shows amazing number of cycles.
I had to fix this with hdparm -B 254 /dev/sda and make a script so it takes effect at boot time.
Has anayone succeeded in making the Hot keys workking ?
For instance the hardware switch for wifi ? On my Debian it doesn't work. I can switch the wlan on or off with that switch, it keeps on working.
Any known workaround ?
February 21, 2011 10:55:03 AM

moulip said:
Don't you face issues with frequent load/unload cycles on the hard drive ?
Mine keep clicking all the time and smartctl shows amazing number of cycles.
I had to fix this with hdparm -B 254 /dev/sda and make a script so it takes effect at boot time.
Has anayone succeeded in making the Hot keys workking ?
For instance the hardware switch for wifi ? On my Debian it doesn't work. I can switch the wlan on or off with that switch, it keeps on working.
Any known workaround ?


The permanent spin downs of the hard disk seem to be "normal" for the Western Digital drive, it completely ignores control commands and decides by itself when to spin down. I also disabled power management, but via hdparm -B255. I didn't make up a special script, there's /etc/hdparm.conf for this purpose.

The hotkey for WLAN does something on my system, but the problem is that the WLAN driver then crashes the whole system so badly that Debian isn't able to boot anymore with WLAN support (the inner state of the Broadcom chip is invalid). At least I assume that the driver is the cause for this. In this case, I had to boot Windows to re-initialize the chip again.

I don't consider these things significant, so I say my system runs "smoothly" ;) 

-Tim
February 21, 2011 10:55:03 AM

moulip said:
Don't you face issues with frequent load/unload cycles on the hard drive ?
Mine keep clicking all the time and smartctl shows amazing number of cycles.
I had to fix this with hdparm -B 254 /dev/sda and make a script so it takes effect at boot time.
Has anayone succeeded in making the Hot keys workking ?
For instance the hardware switch for wifi ? On my Debian it doesn't work. I can switch the wlan on or off with that switch, it keeps on working.
Any known workaround ?


The permanent spin downs of the hard disk seem to be "normal" for the Western Digital drive, it completely ignores control commands and decides by itself when to spin down. I also disabled power management, but via hdparm -B255. I didn't make up a special script, there's /etc/hdparm.conf for this purpose.

The hotkey for WLAN does something on my system, but the problem is that the WLAN driver then crashes the whole system so badly that Debian isn't able to boot anymore with WLAN support (the inner state of the Broadcom chip is invalid). At least I assume that the driver is the cause for this. In this case, I had to boot Windows to re-initialize the chip again.

I don't consider these things significant, so I say my system runs "smoothly" ;) 

-Tim
February 21, 2011 11:42:49 AM

tim8 said:
The permanent spin downs of the hard disk seem to be "normal" for the Western Digital drive, it completely ignores control commands and decides by itself when to spin down. I also disabled power management, but via hdparm -B255. I didn't make up a special script, there's /etc/hdparm.conf for this purpose.

The hotkey for WLAN does something on my system, but the problem is that the WLAN driver then crashes the whole system so badly that Debian isn't able to boot anymore with WLAN support (the inner state of the Broadcom chip is invalid). At least I assume that the driver is the cause for this. In this case, I had to boot Windows to re-initialize the chip again.

I don't consider these things significant, so I say my system runs "smoothly" ;) 

-Tim


the disk behavior is normal but not in such ranges.
Mine used to spin off 30 times a minute !!
I don't think that's quite good for it.
February 21, 2011 12:45:28 PM

moulip said:
the disk behavior is normal but not in such ranges.
Mine used to spin off 30 times a minute !!
I don't think that's quite good for it.


Yes, the behavior of the 1215N disk is pathological. So many spin downs and spin ups are definitely bad for the lifespan. My disk spinned down approx. 3 seconds after every access, so I couldn't work with the system in a reasonable manner. hdparm solved the problem.
February 21, 2011 2:39:51 PM

tim8 said:
Yes, the behavior of the 1215N disk is pathological. So many spin downs and spin ups are definitely bad for the lifespan. My disk spinned down approx. 3 seconds after every access, so I couldn't work with the system in a reasonable manner. hdparm solved the problem.



hdparm is the only thing that works. I kept my windoze partition and use it occasionally. the hard disk clicking is evident in windoze as well. there is a small program for wdoz called hddquiet that basically does the same thing as hdparm. other people have eventually just replaced the HDD with another brand to solve the problem.

Also, tried Squeeze on my machine and wlan, suspend and hibernate did not work. Do all 1215N's have the broadcom WiFi card?
February 21, 2011 4:24:23 PM

bgarr said:
hdparm is the only thing that works. I kept my windoze partition and use it occasionally. the hard disk clicking is evident in windoze as well. there is a small program for wdoz called hddquiet that basically does the same thing as hdparm. other people have eventually just replaced the HDD with another brand to solve the problem.

Also, tried Squeeze on my machine and wlan, suspend and hibernate did not work. Do all 1215N's have the broadcom WiFi card?


I don't know for sure, but I think all 1215N have the Broadcom chip.

My WLAN itself works without problems. I use the firmware-brcm80211 driver. Suspend also works. Hibernate aborts with a message "cannot find swap device". Unfortunately, I guess the WLAN driver cannot cope with suspend, so that the WLAN doesn't work anymore after waking up. But I don't need suspend or hibernate because the system boots very quickly.

I think the 1215N works pretty well under Debian -- last but not least it is designed for Windows, not Linux. If I wanted 100% of the hardware functions working under Linux, I think I would have had to take another (and probably older) machine which is definitely known to be supported completely.
February 21, 2011 5:15:01 PM

tim8 said:
I don't know for sure, but I think all 1215N have the Broadcom chip.

My WLAN itself works without problems. I use the firmware-brcm80211 driver. Suspend also works. Hibernate aborts with a message "cannot find swap device". Unfortunately, I guess the WLAN driver cannot cope with suspend, so that the WLAN doesn't work anymore after waking up. But I don't need suspend or hibernate because the system boots very quickly.

I think the 1215N works pretty well under Debian -- last but not least it is designed for Windows, not Linux. If I wanted 100% of the hardware functions working under Linux, I think I would have had to take another (and probably older) machine which is definitely known to be supported completely.




So basically you installed the broadcom-sta common and source packages using the ethernet connection first? I tried to do this in Squeeze and had a heck of a time until I just gave up. I would love to use Debian instead of a derivative. Did you install with a swap partition?
February 21, 2011 6:11:48 PM

bgarr said:
So basically you installed the broadcom-sta common and source packages using the ethernet connection first? I tried to do this in Squeeze and had a heck of a time until I just gave up. I would love to use Debian instead of a derivative. Did you install with a swap partition?


Hm, I can't remember using broadcom-sta... I think I only installed brcm80211 using dpkg (I downloaded the DEB file using another machine, the Asus didn't have web access). And then it worked. I hope my memory doesn't fool me. I just checked my packages, apt sais broadcom-sta is not installed.
February 27, 2011 1:15:03 AM

This website was giving me registration problems, so was rather terse.

BTW: Can't have period or minus in the local-part of an email address? What RFC 2822 did the forum writer read?

Anyway, to summarize:

GigE not working. Last I checked, latest atheros driver wouldn't compile on recent kernels. Latest driver in Ubuntu seems to flake out after a few seconds.

OPTIMUS not working. That seems to mean HDMI out not working.

ASUS Customer Service, doesn't. They stonewalled me. I have my own theories about why they were so unhelpful.

I've really tried to document everything; I hope you find it useful. I've spent absurd amounts of time on getting this laptop to work, mostly.

I will never buy another ASUS laptop. ZaReason and System76, here I come!
February 28, 2011 9:52:16 PM

solinym said:
Pretty horrible experience with this netbook and Linux.

Detailed here:

http://www.subspacefield.org/~travis/asus_eee_pc_1215n....


This "review" doesn't make much sense to me. The guy seems to be surprised that Linux doesn't run out-of-the-box. Well, that's pretty normal. And he is surprised that the Optimus doesn't work. Oh - my - god. Besides, I installed my Debian in much less than 16 hours and I am NO EXPERT! So, don't believe this "review".
February 28, 2011 10:18:51 PM

Well, "the guy" is a bit surprised that Linux doesn't work right out of the box, since according to my coworker, everything did, on the previous model (1201N, possibly). I bought the 1215N based on that recommendation.

As far as Optimus, I'm not as up-to-date on hardware as most of this board, I'm sure, as I hadn't heard of ION or OPTIMUS prior to buying this laptop. I just saw nVidia and figured it'd be supported in Linux, as that was always the case with my desktops.

Note that this is only my second laptop. My previous one was a HP 2133, whose problems I detailed here:

http://www.subspacefield.org/~travis/hp_2133_links.html

I suppose it's not so much a review as a chronology of the problems I found, but I'm a bit surprised that you don't "believe" it; maybe you think I'm saying that it'll take 16 hours for other people - what I was really saying is that it took 16 hours for me. I'll correct that now.

Hopefully it will save other people who have this laptop a significant amount of time.

Sorry you didn't find it useful.
February 28, 2011 10:35:14 PM

Also, I think it *is* also a bit surprising that none of the EEE distros actually have functional wired or wireless.

I spent several hours on downloading and installing EEE-specific distros that don't work very well (eeebuntu, easypeasy, etc.).

So, yes, if you think 16 hours spent installing is a long time, so do I, and hopefully others can avoid a lot of the dead-ends I ran into. ;-)

Believe it... or not.
March 1, 2011 1:24:51 AM

if you re going to use linux on a machine, you are going to have to expect some kind of configuring. Some of the distros will not work with the wifi until after installation...not sure why. others the wifi works right away. The latest version of Knoppix worked about 90%. Debian Squeeze requires an ethernet connection until you can download and install the broadcom-sta packages. In fact, most of the Debian-based distros work this way. The only issue I have had with any linux on my machine is the inability to suspend or hibernate. I use that feature a lot on my other machine that runs linux with no issues. As far as optimus goes, I could care less at this point. Jupiter does not work the way it is supposed to.

I will keep my windoze partition on my VX6 until suspend/hibernate work.
March 1, 2011 2:18:59 AM

If I recall correctly, support for (at least some) Broadcom wifi chips was dropped from the Linux kernel due to some reason basically boiling down to an unwillingness on the part of Broadcom to release a programming API. Some drivers were based on reverse-engineering existing drivers, and it's entirely possible that they were removed from the kernel for that reason, or because they weren't reliable across all Broadcom chipsets and configurations. I discovered this only because when I installed the latest OpenWRT on my Linksys wrt54g, there was no broadcom support, and I had to downgrade. It's quite possible that Knoppix may include such drivers, similar to how some distros include mp3 codecs and others don't, and similar to how OpenBSD refuses to put "binary blobs" in their kernel source. This is just my speculation, of course.

If anyone gets reliable atheros GigE functionality out of linux on the ASUS 1215n, please let me know. As the article states, I was unable to compile the latest driver source from atheros against the latest kernel. Why Atheros doesn't merge the source into the kernel tree and let them upgrade it every time the device driver APIs change, I don't know. I sent them a few patches to fix up some of their driver source, but didn't have time to do their whole job for them. Of course I never heard back.

BTW, usually Ubuntu distros work pretty much out of the box on desktops (with proper component selection). 90% of the configuration I do is all encapsulated in a shell script. It's laptops and mobile phones that tend to have more proprietary, black box components with special driver requirements, or where you simply don't have the choice of, say, what video card to install. Hopefully that will change over time, but they're resisting commoditization as hard as they can:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbOfnj67ZwM
March 4, 2011 4:12:10 PM

I am writing this on an ASUS 1201T using Linux Mint, no problems. The Linux Mint hardware database contains an entry for the 1215n which says it works perfectly.

-Sonic
March 4, 2011 4:44:30 PM

My VX6 is running three partitions; Windoze 7 pro, Knoppix 6 and Sabayon 5.5 XFCE 64 bit. Both Knoppix and Sabayon work very well, including suspend. No hybrid graphx (to be expected). I would recommend either of these distros for the 1215N or the VX6.
March 4, 2011 4:46:54 PM

I forgot to mention that the WiFi didn't work straight away, but was up and running on both after installation without any extra configuration.
May 4, 2011 9:22:21 PM

with http://linux-hybrid-graphics.blogspot.com/2010/10/howto... you can disable the nvidia gpu on linux to make your battery time just as good as on windows currently you cant use it anyways so why have it running taking power and you need kernel 2.6.37+ to get internet working properly aswell other then that i got my asus 1215n working flawlessly on archlinux with the intel gpu even bluetooth working
September 1, 2011 4:27:30 AM

I've had pretty bad experience using Ubuntu with 1215N.

First I tried Ubuntu 10.04, ran into problem with
- wireless - on and off
- microphone - didn't work at all

Then I upgraded to 10.10
- now wireless and wired both work fine
- and microphone works too
- but then I can't get any external monitor to work

I'm wondering if I'm missing some driver? But from what I've read here and else where, I could get black screen for trying that so I've held off.

Other problem with the 1215N
- Had to send it back to to ASUS service to fix the power plug: the needle got stuck in the power plug. Apparently a common problem that others also ran into.
- The screen isn't that bright, has problem in sunlight.
- The touchpad keys are flimpsy.

Not as sturdy and well-made as the EEE PC 1000 also from ASUS, which worked perfectly with 10.04. But I do like the bigger screen and faster processor.
January 31, 2012 8:15:16 PM

If you're having nVidia Optimus issues, you should check out Bumblebee.

The guide is from ArchLinux but I use it on my Ubuntu install and it works great. You basically select the applications you want to use the nVidia card with, all others default to integrated graphics. Just read the install instructions carefully.

Also, if you have issues loading up Ubuntu from liveCD, press F6 while you see the Graphical Menu (whichever the button is labeled for additional options) and check apci=off to see if that helps. Peace!
a b 5 Linux
January 31, 2012 11:47:00 PM

Good advice, just perhaps a little late in the game considering the last post before yours was just shy of a year ago.
June 22, 2012 8:09:58 AM

I'v installed many linux distroes on 1215n. finally I chosed debian branches like ubuntu, solusOS, Parsix. (but not linuxmint) all of them works fine.

The touchpad problem is a hardware problem. you must open the touchpad case and paste something between the floor and the case itself. (I did it and solved the problem).

ION can be turned off. as we don't play games, you can keep it off for ever!

I have 4hrs 40min battery charge with ION off, and 3hrs with ION on.

wifi, usb3, fn keys, lan, bluetooth, everything works.

but as you may know, Linux is not like windows which everything is ready to use. you should know a little about linux to make it work on your 1215n. If you are a newbie, and you don't want to eat your time (!) in struggling with linux, I recommend you windows 7 + an antivirus!!!
a b 5 Linux
June 22, 2012 10:10:10 AM

This topic has been closed by Amdfangirl
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