E6600 Core Duo Install Questions

Hello Everyone,

I just built my first computer last weekend and everything seems to be running fine. However, I am not sure if I installed the Heatsink Fan onto the Intel E6600 Core Duo correctly. I installed the Core Duo exactly as the Intel manual says but there was no mention of using a "thermal compound" in the manual. In other words, I just put the heatsink fan on top of the CPU as shown in the manual. I have been reading about this thermal compound on the Internet and now have some questions:

1) Do I need a thermal compound between the CPU and the heatsink fan?

2) Does the E6600 come with thermal compound already applied on the heatsink fan? If so, is there a material or sheet of plastic that needs to be removed from the bottom of the heatsink fan prior to putting the heatsink fan on top of the CPU?

I did not look under the heatsink fan prior to installation (hey this is my first time doing this and I was kind of nervous!). In other words, I a) removed the CPU bottom cover, b) popped and locked the CPU onto the motherboard, then c) put the heatsink fan on top of the CPU by locking its four pegs on the motherboad. I stupidly did not inspect the bottom of the heatsink fan to see if there is a sheet or something I needed to remove prior to sticking the heatsink fan on top of the CPU itself.

I am worried my new computer might overheat so am wondering if I have to open the darn thing again and remove the heatsink fan from the CPU to check. I would rather not do that as I am already happy the whole thing even works!

Thank you very much for any information you can send my way.
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  1. Well, firstly, it is important to have a thermal compound between the heatsink and the cpu.

    I've just checked my stock heatsink that came with my E6600, and I think you may be in luck. My heatsink has the thermal compound applied to the base, and there is no plastic strip protecting it. Assuming your heatsink was supplied in the same way, then you're good to go.

    I would keep an eye on those temps when first booting though just to be safe :wink:
  2. Yes, you need a thermal compound between the cpu and the cooler. It's usually included with the stock cooling on it already. If there's a film covering the factory applied thermal compound on the stock cooler you must remove it. It doesn't hurt to check it again.

    By the way I suggest you get a better cooler anyway like the Artic Cooling Freezer 7 or the Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme if you're overclocking the cpu.

    What are you're temps on both idle and full load?
  3. Thank you both for the quick reply. I think I can sleep better now :D I may still have to get a better cooling unit or something in the near future. I bought everything (chassis, motherboard, drive, nVidia card, DVD etc.) in one shot and my wallet is a little bit sore right now, and I would rather not open the whole thing up again if I don't have to.

    By the way, how do I check the CPU temperature? Is the CPU temperature something I can access with Vista?
  4. 1) yes.

    2) Intels stock heatsink has thermal compound pre applied.
  5. 1) yes.

    2) Intels stock heatsink has thermal compound pre applied.
  6. Try this to monitor your temps:

    http://www.almico.com/speedfan432.exe
  7. Using the Almico program, I get readings of about 29-31C for both cores when idle, and 38-41 for both cores when the computer is going all out (downloading updates, editing pictures, virus scanning, etc. at the same time). Probably mostly in the 38s but peaks to 40-41C at full load for brief periods.

    Is this normal?
  8. Intel - CPU installation

    Video has its advantages.
  9. Quote:
    Using the Almico program, I get readings of about 29-31C for both cores when idle, and 38-41 for both cores when the computer is going all out (downloading updates, editing pictures, virus scanning, etc. at the same time). Probably mostly in the 38s but peaks to 40-41C at full load for brief periods.

    Is this normal?


    Looks fine to me. My dad gets those temps on a E4300 OC to 2.4 Ghz. (when the room temp is chilly)

    Edit:

    :oops:

    Actually my dad's temps are higher.. I read that too fast. Also you could be using a temp app that may give a cooler reading of 15C at the most.
  10. set your ram and cpu to 1:1 or 1:2 as it really is in the bios

    cpu fsb 1450-1500
    Vcore 1.42-1.46 - you need 1.42 for th to be stable at 3.37ghz

    ram should 2.05 -2.15v - hopefully you got the low latecny ddr800 set it to 725-750fsb for the 1:1

    try for 4-4-3-10 run stablity tests and mem test

    make one change at a time boot into bios

    if the system hangs up in vista or crashes lower something
    program system with defult settings 2.4ghz etc
  11. Your temps look spot on m8, under a serious load e.g. using the Intel TAT (google it, but it may not work in Vista), they will climb somewhat higher but you look good to go.

    If you are going to overclock then a good place to start is Wusy's C2D guide over in the Overclock forum (unless you already know what ur doing of course).
  12. temps will be 28-38c idel - 28c outside of the case, 38c with limited air flow
    45-55c max with stock hsf or better

    most likely if higher the heatsink has not settled - good themal coumpound is much slower to settle

    you need a 12cm fan in and door fan in, a 12cm fan out or 2 80x and the psu out

    add memory fans and chipset fans
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