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Asus P5K vs P5K Deluxe

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May 15, 2007 10:39:24 PM

Can anyone tell me the difference between Asus P5K and P5K Deluxe, other than the enormous price difference? I can't see why I would fork over an extra $80 or whatever to take the Deluxe over the vanilla.

More about : asus p5k p5k deluxe

May 15, 2007 11:33:51 PM

Deluxe comes with Wifi adapter.

Thats what I know so far.
May 16, 2007 12:21:41 AM

P5K Deluxe has wifi, black PCB, more advanced BIOS options. Probably a better overclocker. Deluxe has 6 SATA ports instead of 4, also has a RAID controller where the P5K vanilla doesn't. Deluxe has 10 USB ports, P5K has 12. Deluxe has a bigger HS solution for NB and VRMs. Deluxe costs ~100 bucks more.
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May 16, 2007 12:22:51 AM

Deluxe versions usually cost a lot more but I think they have always overclock well.
May 16, 2007 12:29:50 AM

Btw, these are for sale at Excalibur PC and have specs listed.
May 16, 2007 12:56:17 AM

The only things I can see are the wireless LAN, dual LAN instead of LAN, ICH9R instead of ICH9 and slightly better audio codec (plus optical audio jack in addition to the coaxial jack that the P5K has). Am I missing something, because that doesn't seem to be worth a $90 (about 60% of cost) premium.
May 16, 2007 1:24:48 AM

Well, is the X6800 really worth 4 times the E6600? No. Will some people still pay for it? Yup. You're not missing anything, that's just the world of enthusiast computing. Honestly though, if you had the P5K and decided you wanted a RAID controller, and an extra NIC, and a wifi adaptor, chances are you'd have to spend quite a bit of that 90 dollar difference. So, even though it's kind of a rip, it's much, much less of a rip than say...the 8800 Ultra. Plus you get the extra bios options and better heatsinks.

BTW, does anyone remember the good old days before C2D's arrived when a top-of-the line mobo rarely ever crept above $200? I miss that.
May 16, 2007 1:59:19 AM

But I think the P5K Deluxe is worth it

so far we have

1) Wifi adapter
2) Black PCB
3) Advanced BIOS Options
4) 6 Sata Ports (4 on normal)
5) 10 USB ports (normal 12)
6) Bigger HS solution
7) Dual LAN
8) ICH9R
9) Better Audio Codec + Optical Audio Jack
10) **Most Important I would say** Better OC?

So far P5B Deluxe had most of the best OC in most review pages.
May 16, 2007 2:15:17 AM

P5B or P5K? The P35-DS3 by Gigabyte looks like a really good buy at ~160 and it's able to easily surpass 500FSB with a Core 2 and, amazingly, hits 472FSB with a Core 2 Quad! The only thing that kinda turns me off about it is only 1 x16 PCIe slot.
May 16, 2007 12:45:18 PM

I haven't seen the P35 DS3 yet but I know the DQ6 is around $280..
Anyhow I would say only having 4 SATA ports on the P5K versus the Deluxe's 6 is the biggest deal breaker for me. Actually I was considering the same thing. I would never need the Dual-Lan, wireless, or even Raid.
Just 4 SATA ports is almost useless in my usage, and to buy an add in is just an extra cost.
May 16, 2007 1:07:45 PM

Quote:
Well, is the X6800 really worth 4 times the E6600? No. Will some people still pay for it? Yup. You're not missing anything, that's just the world of enthusiast computing. Honestly though, if you had the P5K and decided you wanted a RAID controller, and an extra NIC, and a wifi adaptor, chances are you'd have to spend quite a bit of that 90 dollar difference. So, even though it's kind of a rip, it's much, much less of a rip than say...the 8800 Ultra. Plus you get the extra bios options and better heatsinks.

BTW, does anyone remember the good old days before C2D's arrived when a top-of-the line mobo rarely ever crept above $200? I miss that.


True, true. They build the top end models and then try to make you think that you NEED them and can't get by with the basic model. I agree, nice mobos sure have gotten expensive!
May 16, 2007 1:30:03 PM

Quote:
But I think the P5K Deluxe is worth it

so far we have

1) Wifi adapter
2) Black PCB
3) Advanced BIOS Options
4) 6 Sata Ports (4 on normal)
5) 10 USB ports (normal 12)
6) Bigger HS solution
7) Dual LAN
8) ICH9R
9) Better Audio Codec + Optical Audio Jack
10) **Most Important I would say** Better OC?

So far P5B Deluxe had most of the best OC in most review pages.


The P5K has 12 USB as well, and in addition to the 4 Sata Ports on the Southbridge of the P5K it also has 1 Sata, 2 IDE and 1 eSata controlled by the JMicron. It would be nice to have the better audio codec and optical audio, but I am not going to pay 60% more for that. The thing that concerns me most however, is the OC (considering I am buying an E4400!)

Does anyone know how the OC compares with the following P35 boards?

P5K
P5K Deluxe
DQ6
DS3
MSI Platinum

???

Also, I read that only the Bearlake-X is going to have the PCIE 2.0, not the P35. How important is PCIE 2.0 going to be over the next couple of years?
May 16, 2007 2:08:11 PM

I don't think anyone will be able to tell you anything definitive about the comparative overclocks of those boards. I know the DS3 is supposedly able to go over 500FSB with a dual core, but that's it. Apparently this chipset overclocks just as well as the P965, and possibly a little better. More reviews should be popping up all over in the next week, so hang tight.

PCIe 2.0 isn't going to be a big deal for a little while, at least for 2 more years. At this point, nothing needs the extra bandwidth. Eventually, the big high-end vid cards will adopt it, probably starting sometime next year.
May 16, 2007 2:47:41 PM

Quote:
I don't think anyone will be able to tell you anything definitive about the comparative overclocks of those boards. I know the DS3 is supposedly able to go over 500FSB with a dual core, but that's it. Apparently this chipset overclocks just as well as the P965, and possibly a little better. More reviews should be popping up all over in the next week, so hang tight.

PCIe 2.0 isn't going to be a big deal for a little while, at least for 2 more years. At this point, nothing needs the extra bandwidth. Eventually, the big high-end vid cards will adopt it, probably starting sometime next year.


well, I am not waiting any longer for bearlake-x and I don't want to pay $300 either. I'll check out the P35 reviews early next week and order my system then! I was originally thinking to go with a 650i ultra board, but I'll want to upgrade my CPU to a Penryn late next year after the Nehalem's come out, and I won't want to have to buy a new mobo.

It looks like we can use the OCs of the P965 boards as a general guideline for what the OCs of the P35s might be. Did the P5B OC very well? I think I read the Gigabyte boards OC well. As long as I can get the E4400 up to 3 GHz on stock cooling I'll be happy. I'd hope that the P5K could at least do that....
May 16, 2007 5:01:38 PM

Uh, from 2 to 3Ghz is a pretty big jump, and I'm not sure the P5K would be the best choice for that. The P5B vanilla was a pretty lame overclocker. Further, you'll need better than stock cooling to run a chip 1Ghz over design freq.
May 16, 2007 8:05:15 PM

Quote:
Uh, from 2 to 3Ghz is a pretty big jump, and I'm not sure the P5K would be the best choice for that. The P5B vanilla was a pretty lame overclocker. Further, you'll need better than stock cooling to run a chip 1Ghz over design freq.



Based on the bit of research that I did, the E4400 is an excellent chip for overclocking. I heard it is similar to the E6700 but that some of the cache is disabled. This site says 3 GHz stock is easy to do.

http://www.legionhardware.com/document.php?id=642&p=0
May 16, 2007 8:18:02 PM

I forgot about the P35-DS3 and the DQ6

I would definetily (misspelling) go for either those. ASUS is going down...
May 16, 2007 8:21:13 PM

I forgot about the P35-DS3 and the DQ6

I would definetily (misspelling) go for either those. ASUS is going down...
May 16, 2007 8:47:32 PM

what don't you like about ASUS boards?
May 16, 2007 8:47:59 PM

Wow, that's impressive. I would still invest 40 bucks in a good aftermarket cooler if I were you though.
May 16, 2007 8:48:16 PM

what don't you like about ASUS boards?
May 16, 2007 8:51:40 PM

Quote:
Wow, that's impressive. I would still invest 40 bucks in a good aftermarket cooler if I were you though.


If you are going to spend the extra $40, you might as well get the E6420 or get a better video card or something.... The point of going with the E4400 is to save money and still get decent performance.
May 16, 2007 9:29:00 PM

Quote:
what don't you like about ASUS boards?


why exactly is that???
May 16, 2007 9:52:05 PM

Quote:
Uh, from 2 to 3Ghz is a pretty big jump, and I'm not sure the P5K would be the best choice for that. The P5B vanilla was a pretty lame overclocker. Further, you'll need better than stock cooling to run a chip 1Ghz over design freq.


You're forgetting that the E4400 works on 10x200mhz, so increasing it to 10x300 would be no problem for the mobo, as P35 officially supports 333mhz fsb.
May 17, 2007 1:32:28 AM

No, I'm well aware the mobo can support it FSB wise, but the chip might not. It is a 1Ghz overclock after all..
May 17, 2007 2:07:16 AM

Yeah a 50% overclock seems like a lot, but honestly those cores are very capable of running at 3.0Ghz. Most of the reviews show doing it without any voltage increase either. Certainly nothing is guaranteed but it is very common.
What I don't understand is other than the 10 multiplier why people are starting to choose the 4400 over the 4300, as the price difference is around $30 and really you are getting the same thing. I would think the 4400 may be a better binned chip but still I am doubting there is any real difference.
May 17, 2007 12:58:41 PM

Quote:
No, I'm well aware the mobo can support it FSB wise, but the chip might not. It is a 1Ghz overclock after all..


Can anyone guess the life expectancy of the following:

i) E4400 chip not overclocked
ii) E4400 chip OC very slightly, no increase to voltage
iii) E4400 chip OC to 3 GHz, no increase to voltate (if possible)
iv) E4400 chip OC to 3 GHz+, increase to voltate

I have no idea myself, but it would be great to get some input from some of the experienced people on this forum. As long as the chip would last 2 years or so, I'd be happy.
May 17, 2007 2:34:08 PM

That's something impossible to even estimate. Here's what you don't want:

1: A large Delta T i.e. >20 degrees
2: Prolonged temps above 60C

So there you have it, avoid those, and you'll likely have a CPU that will last at least 2 years, and possibly much longer.
May 17, 2007 3:30:48 PM

That is good to know. Do I have to install special hardware in order to determine the temperature of the CPU or does the mobo have this built in?
May 17, 2007 4:26:42 PM

The CPU has built-in temperature systems integrated into both cores. Proper reading of these temps depends on the motherboard. Some bios revs give funky temps. Some programs read the temperature readings differently as well, so it's a good idea to use a variety.
May 17, 2007 7:52:43 PM

Quote:
No, I'm well aware the mobo can support it FSB wise, but the chip might not. It is a 1Ghz overclock after all..


Can anyone guess the life expectancy of the following:

i) E4400 chip not overclocked
ii) E4400 chip OC very slightly, no increase to voltage
iii) E4400 chip OC to 3 GHz, no increase to voltate (if possible)
iv) E4400 chip OC to 3 GHz+, increase to voltate

I have no idea myself, but it would be great to get some input from some of the experienced people on this forum. As long as the chip would last 2 years or so, I'd be happy.

It really depends on the cooling that you use, also the vcore that you use. I can tell that anything higher than 1.55vcore in 24/7 operation decreases a lot the cpu life.

And why people choose the E4400, higher OC guaranteed somehow? 10 multiplier which makes it easier on some motherboard to OC?
May 17, 2007 11:07:05 PM

Quote:
No, I'm well aware the mobo can support it FSB wise, but the chip might not. It is a 1Ghz overclock after all..


Can anyone guess the life expectancy of the following:

i) E4400 chip not overclocked
ii) E4400 chip OC very slightly, no increase to voltage
iii) E4400 chip OC to 3 GHz, no increase to voltate (if possible)
iv) E4400 chip OC to 3 GHz+, increase to voltate

I have no idea myself, but it would be great to get some input from some of the experienced people on this forum. As long as the chip would last 2 years or so, I'd be happy.

From what I know, the difference in lifespan between an Overclocked CPU and a CPU at stock is 7 years to 10 years, too long to make much of a difference. As long as you use proper cooling, and avoid high temps you should be OK.

A great budget cooler is the ACF7P or Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro for $30-35
May 18, 2007 3:08:55 AM

Ok WAY off topic from what the thread is but I wanted to continue with what we were discussing.

I am not disagreeing but the whole logic doesn't make sense to me.

Mainly in the example of an overclocked chip running the stock voltage, with good cooling (more or less temps in an acceptable range) and saying the lifespan will decrease. I wouldn't see why the lifespan would go down any when compared to a higher marketed chip with the same core, I mean the only real differences would be the multiplier and possibly a better binned chip.
I do understand it would be operating at a higher frequency than it was released at, but it is still the same core.

Any thoughts here or am I completely nuts?
I know the 43/4400 are allendale cores, vs. conroe so I am not saying that directly.
December 10, 2007 7:22:05 PM

hat about Gigabyte GA-X38-DQ6 or ASUS Maximus Formula?
December 10, 2007 7:26:52 PM

what about Gigabyte GA-X38-DQ6 or ASUS Maximus Formula?
!