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New build--HDDs don't register full size!!

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May 16, 2007 12:17:29 AM

Evenin;

Just put together the following:
CASE SILVERSTONETJ09-B BK RT - Retail
Western Digital Raptor WD1500ADFD 150GB 10,000 RPM Serial ATA150 Hard Drive - OEM
Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 (Perpendicular Recording) ST3250620AS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
GIGABYTE GA-965P-DS3 LGA 775 Intel P965 Express ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
CORSAIR XMS2 1GB 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Desktop Memory Model CM2X1024-6400PRO - Retail times 2
Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail
XION Supernova XON-600F14R-201 ATX 600W Certified Power Supply - Retail

This is my first time dealing with a sata hdd. I installed Win XP Pro, followed up with XP SP/2.

On start up, I hit F6 to install Sata drivers. I foloowed the directions to a "T". But when I got to the point of formating the HDD, it only recognized 131088 mb. I continued the install. When all was said and done my 150gb raptor only reads as 127 gb in My Computer. The Seagate 250gb reads as 232gb.

What have I done wrong? There are different settings in bios:
ACHI?
Stata/ide controler=ACHI, raid/ide

Any ieas? It is probably something dumb that I did.

Your help is appreciated.
Thanks,
Don
a c 99 à CPUs
May 16, 2007 12:23:54 AM

You need to update Windows to use 48-bit LBA addressing. It is not present in Windows XP < SP1a IIRC. The SP2 update should have done it- you should see all 150 GB. The HDD should show up at about 139 GB after it's all done.
May 16, 2007 12:50:32 AM

You did nothing wrong. Its the way the math is done. I forget the math behind it but its something to to with bytes *1000 someone can prob post it for you. its slipping my mind right now. My 200 GB drive reads as 186 GB in windows and my 400 reads as 373GB and my 36 reads as 34 GB.
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May 16, 2007 12:50:49 AM

You did nothing wrong. Its the way the math is done. I forget the math behind it but its something to to with bytes *1000 someone can prob post it for you. its slipping my mind right now. My 200 GB drive reads as 186 GB in windows and my 400 reads as 373GB and my 36 reads as 34 GB.
May 16, 2007 1:12:00 AM

I second you did nothing wrong

Same thing with Vista Ultimate (32 bit)

My 200 gig drives only shows 189 gig
My 250 gig drive shows 232 gig
a c 99 à CPUs
May 16, 2007 2:09:53 AM

A 150 GB hard drive nominally has a tad over 150 billion bytes. This works out to 150x10^9/(1024^3) = 139.7 GB. This is 93% of your "rated" space and is very close to the ratio that your 250 GB drives exhibit. You'll lose up to a couple hundred MB in file system overhead, but not 12 GB.

The fact that the drive showed up as ~127 GB is a dead giveaway that it was having addressing issue problems. The old (effectively 37-bit) addressing system only can address 128 GB in one partition. The new 48-bit LBA can address 256 TB of space, although generally most boards' BIOSes may have trouble with drives over 2 TB in size. The fix is the LBA48 patch that's in SP1 or SP1a for Windows XP. You installed the original XP sans service packs on the 150 GB Raptor and then likely didn't do much with the 250 before SP2 was installed, correct? I'd personally never had to deal with the LBA48 issue with my computer as I (very rarely) boot Windows from a 25 GB partition on a 74 GB Raptor and run Linux as my main OS. LBA48 has been in Linux for quite some time, so my 250s show up perfectly. Maybe you should ask this in the drives section or in the Windows forum for how to retrofit the OS to address the missing 12 GB on the Raptor.
May 16, 2007 2:11:33 AM

if you use linux, i think it should register all of the capacity.. but with any windows systems, it will use binary numbers to format the hdd (the advertised size is true, because its calculated differently)

just agreeing with everyone else :p 
May 16, 2007 2:55:55 AM

It's due to your maths vs the HD manufactures maths

As everyone knows, PCs work with binary
However the manufacture cheats and uses decimal as it gets a higher value

Hence 1KB = 1024 bytes, 1 MB = 1024 KB, 1GB = 1024 MB etc

250 * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 / 1024 / 1024 /1024 = 232.83

i.e. Windows (which is using 1024, not 1000) sees the drive as 232.83 which is 93.132% of the rated space

Hope this helps
May 16, 2007 11:09:53 AM

Thanks to all that replied! I do appreciate it. I was aware of the math difference between advertised unformatted space and formatted space. I just didn't think it would be so large a piece.

Thank uou all, again.
Don
May 16, 2007 11:25:53 AM

i assume you are aware of the indexing tables that allows ur os to find the files, these will reduce your "actual storage space" by around 10%

i think in ntfs its call the master table file or sumthin
May 16, 2007 2:03:06 PM

I had the same problem with my 320G SATA I upgraded to SP2 and used Partition Magic 8 to recover the missing space.
!