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Split partition C in to 2 drives for Ubuntu and Windows

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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December 6, 2010 11:28:04 AM

Hi,

I am using a HP laptop that comes with a gigantic C partition and am now requiring to split it in to two. This is because I am interested in using Ubuntu and would like to dedicate some space for it.

Is there a way to do this split without needing to mess with my Windows files? Is there a Windows tool that can do the trick else what to use? Any advice?

I am going to install Ubuntu 64bit 10.10. Any comments about that would be appreciated as well :) 

I use Windows Home Premium.

Thank you in advance.
December 8, 2010 2:34:32 AM

This topic has been moved from the section Windows 7 to section Linux/Free BSD by Buwish
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December 8, 2010 1:11:15 PM

when installing ubuntu you get the option to, format HDD/SSD and install ubuntu 100% or do a half/half install with the option to boot up on windows or ubuntu everytime you turn on the computer. this will not change your windows files in anyway.

for example 500BG HDD =

247.5GB ubuntu
2.5GB linux swap
230GB Windows 7
20GB windows swap

have fun on ubuntu =D
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December 8, 2010 3:50:40 PM

CsG_kieran_2 said:
when installing ubuntu you get the option to, format HDD/SSD and install ubuntu 100% or do a half/half install with the option to boot up on windows or ubuntu everytime you turn on the computer. this will not change your windows files in anyway.

for example 500BG HDD =

247.5GB ubuntu
2.5GB linux swap
230GB Windows
20GB windows swap

have fun on ubuntu =D


Sounds pretty simple. Thanks for the reply.

I got a quesiton, Will this make 3 different drives (lets say some thing like C D E) where C is for Windows in NTFS and D is for Linux with EXT3 file format? The other for SWAP etc? I don't like NTFS much :) 

Yah, Ubuntu is fun, even though there isn't the countless array of applications as for Windows. Its cute, its fast, and its really capable :) 
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Best solution

December 9, 2010 5:51:02 AM

Linux doesn't assign drive letters so you won't see C, D or E anywhere. Linux names drives in the form /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc etc. Partitions are /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2 (ie. 1st and 2nd partitions of the first drive) etc.

What you'll end up with is something like this:

/dev/sda1 - NTFS
/dev/sda2 - EXT4 (or whatever you choose)
/dev/sda3* - SWAP

You don't necessarily need swap if you've got plenty of RAM. Unlike Windows, Linux will use swap only when absolutely necessary. You can just add a 256-512MB partition for good measure if you want. Unless you only have 1GB of RAM you probably won't need more than that :) 


*Possibly /dev/sda5 if the installer decides to make an extended partition (/dev/sda4 which will not show up in the installer) with SWAP on a logical partition inside that. I'm not entirely sure what it will do. If you choose to make a custom partition layout instead of letting the installer do it for you then there will be an option when creating the partition to force it as primary though so do that and you can be certain that it will be /dev/sda3 for simplicity's sake.
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December 9, 2010 11:42:03 AM

Best answer selected by ZiyanDeen.
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December 9, 2010 11:43:47 AM

Goinna give it a go just after the end-semester exammination...

(Incase things go wrong)

Thanks eveyr one, thanks for shifting for the Linux forum 'moderator'...

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year incase I don't get any problems by then...
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