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Totally new to linux, which is best?

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Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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January 28, 2011 11:53:13 AM

Hi guys,

I'm looking into venturing into Linux just to see what it's like. I've been on Windows for as long as i can remember and i'm just going to say right now that i do love Windows 7 (my current OS). However the concept of Linux has always intrigued me and i feel like doing something about this curiosity!

I took a look and it seems Ubuntu is the most popular iteration of Linux, is that right? So i may just try that to be on the safe side.

I am not very big with anything to do with command prompt etc and i do not really know how to install display drivers, motherboard drivers for this platform.

So for a noob, is Ubuntu okay and will it be user friendly when i get in there, or will i need to develop my IT 1337 skills (or whatever)?

Thanks

More about : totally linux

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a b 5 Linux
January 28, 2011 1:35:29 PM

Ubuntu is very user friendly. Try a Live CD first - you have nothing to lose.
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January 28, 2011 2:58:14 PM

Best answer selected by Griffolion.
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January 28, 2011 2:58:18 PM

Thanks a lot :) .
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January 28, 2011 3:55:50 PM

You can try livecds for any number of distributions. Each one has a different default 'feel' than the others. Ubuntu is popular but so is Fedora, Debian and a handful of others. Welcome to the Linux community.
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a b 5 Linux
January 28, 2011 5:34:37 PM

Yep. It's worth checking a few out. Mandriva is one of my favourites.
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February 12, 2011 3:05:56 AM

use mint it has many codecs and it is the same as ubuntu.but it is better than ubuntu.
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a b 5 Linux
February 12, 2011 4:34:49 AM

ash256 said:
use mint it has many codecs and it is the same as ubuntu.but it is better than ubuntu.


It's in no way better. The only difference are the inclusion of non-opensource codecs, and a different theme/menu. All of these things are available on Ubuntu for installation should you feel the need.
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a b 5 Linux
February 13, 2011 1:32:33 AM

Griffolion said:
I am not very big with anything to do with command prompt etc and i do not really know how to install display drivers, motherboard drivers for this platform.

Drivers come bundled with the kernel, which is the most core part of an operating system and communicates with the hardware. Some devices may need additional drivers to be installed, but this is normally for extremely new devices... or wireless. As far as the command line is concerned, try to learn it anyway. You will find how much easier it is to administrate your computer when you can do everything in a single window instead of clicking around until you find the right menu and right buttons. I use the command line in Windows sometimes because there are times when the GUI just doesn't allow me to do what I want.
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