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Linux Vs AIX

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April 4, 2011 8:41:50 AM

Dear All ,


I'm new to this thread and I'm thanking lord that there are such helpful experts who valunteer to assist each others .

My query is that I want to have Unix AIX at home but can't easily get the hardware and all ,thus I decided to have linux rather than that ,where I wonder which linux/Unix can be very close to AIX in terms of structure and commands usage .

Many thanks .

Baash .

More about : linux aix

April 4, 2011 8:45:09 AM

baash said:
Dear All ,


I'm new to this thread and I'm thanking lord that there are such helpful experts who valunteer to assist each others .

My query is that I want to have Unix AIX at home but can't easily get the hardware and all ,thus I decided to have linux rather than that ,where I wonder which open source linux/Unix can be very close to AIX in terms of structure and commands usage .

Many thanks .

Baash .

April 4, 2011 8:52:30 AM

baash said:
Dear All ,


I'm new to this thread and I'm thanking lord that there are such helpful experts who valunteer to assist each others .

My query is that I want to have Unix AIX at home but can't easily get the hardware and all ,thus I decided to have linux rather than that ,where I wonder which open source linux/Unix can be very close to AIX in terms of structure and commands usage .

Many thanks .

Baash .

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a b 5 Linux
April 4, 2011 9:00:47 AM

Why, in particular, did you pick AIX? What features of AIX are the ones that are important to you? Although all Unix-type operating systems are broadly similar in concept and commands, they do differ in detail.

It may be that the OS that most suits your requirements would be Solaris, or one of the FreeBSDs; it may be one of the many Linux distros. But without knowing what your requirements are it's difficult to be more specific.

Anyway, have a look at all of those and decide for yourself which OS is closest to the particulars of AIX that matter to you.
April 4, 2011 11:19:31 AM

Thanks iJack for the reply ,well my goal is to be AIX certified since we highly depend on AIX at work and as you know it is too expensive to get a whole AIX hardware and software only for the sake of training .
this is why I thought of a freer open source UNIX or Linux system that would help be practice UNIX AIX commands and tools on a PC based system X64 bit .

hope this clarifies ,

Thanks
a b 5 Linux
April 4, 2011 11:53:54 AM

I believe that Solaris is probably the closest that you will find to an AIX system, or possible FreeBSD. I think AIX uses the Common Desktop Environment - you can set either system up to use that. I don't think you will find an equivalent to AIX's System Management Interface Tool.

Most of the commands are fairly universal on Unix systems (although there may be some slight variation in parameters). I think that either of the systems that I mention would give you a good foundation in using a real Unix and allow you to easily transfer to an AIX system to brush up on the final details.

You might also like to checkout the AIX section of the IBM Systems Magazine, which has some useful articles.

Good luck with your endeavours.
April 4, 2011 12:28:22 PM

Thanks iJack but as far as I know Sun Solaries is not a free open source ,moreover it also requires special hardware ,am I right .

Thanks ,
a b 5 Linux
April 4, 2011 2:13:25 PM

There is an open version of Solaris (get it here: http://hub.opensolaris.org/bin/view/Main/downloads), but it is slightly out of date. You can download Solaris Express for free from the Oracle web site (http://www.oracle.com/us/products/servers-storage/solar...). Both will run on x86 (or x86_64) hardware and work fine with most computers. I've sometimes found it to be more forgiving of hardware than some Linux distributions.

FreeBSD is also (as it's name implies) free. Get it from http://www.freebsd.org.
April 5, 2011 7:02:25 AM

Thaaanks iJack ,

Very very valuable information ,I will immediately give it a try .


Regards
April 8, 2011 3:15:02 AM

Or... You could do some AIX research about compatibility and then ebay an IBM power server with the OS installed and go straight to AIX. Then, when you are done, ebay it back. Its still not cheap to start, but the cost after you sell might not be that bad. There are also some resellers out there. The open solaris idea is a great place to start as well. Just load it in a VM and play without spending a dime. However, HPUX might be a little closer to AIX, but you have to spend money as well. The day-to-day commands and operation are very similar between the Unix's, but when you sit down to do some volume management, installation, clustering, or patching with AIX, expected to find you have something to learn.
April 9, 2011 1:32:25 PM

Thank you goobaah for your contribution ,I will combine both ideas but I think a power server will be very costly as I think besides it will cost shipping and all since I'm living in Africa .

Thank you .
April 10, 2011 9:40:16 PM

Why don't you just ask them if you can do some unpaid overtime setting up the servers and really learning the ins and outs of the system?
April 11, 2011 6:52:02 AM

Varis , this is not a bad idea and that is what I have been using to survive but I need to work from home which will give me more flexibility on time .

Thanks for your contribution .
June 3, 2011 11:12:56 PM

If you need to learn Power systems and AIX I would recommend spending a few bones on Ebay and buying a used one. I did that long ago on Craigslist for Solaris Sparc and HPUX.
a b 5 Linux
June 5, 2011 5:56:49 PM

What version of AIX do you want to run? I believe you might be able to get versions prior to 5.2 running on QEMU (Processor Emulation). I have to say though that a second hand box might be the easier way to go.
a b 5 Linux
June 5, 2011 6:02:29 PM

OpenIndiana is a forked version of the previously free and open-source OpenSolaris.
a b 5 Linux
June 5, 2011 6:11:56 PM

Unfortunately, Rs6000s and pSeries tend to command pretty high prices on eBay.
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