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Dual Boot

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Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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April 19, 2011 4:53:19 PM

Never tried Linux before. Decided I'd give it a whirl and learn the ins and outs. I've done some research and decided to run Ubuntu 10.10. I'm planning on picking up an OCZ Vertex 2 120GB here soon. Currently running an Intel X25-V 40GB. I know the one I currently have is not enough to run both OS. However, for a dual boot does it HAVE to be on the same drive? Or can you dual boot off of more than one drive (not in raid)? Thanks ahead for the help.

More about : dual boot

April 19, 2011 6:39:58 PM

You can dual boot off separate drives. The bootloader will be on the first drive but it can load the OS of either.
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April 24, 2011 5:16:56 PM

+1
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April 25, 2011 10:13:41 PM

You can dual boot from the same disk.
You can boot from two individual disks (using bios).

If you just want to see the os, it's better to use a usb flash drive. Install the distro (Ubuntu 10.10) on the usb and boot from it. It works as a LiveCD. I did that and it works. From what i was reading, you can also install the OS on the usb and use it as a normal hard disk. If you like it, then you can just copy the os straight into the hard disk.
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April 26, 2011 6:36:23 AM

You don't need to use the BIOS to boot from multiple disks (either for Windows or Linux). Just configure the boot loader.
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April 27, 2011 3:44:19 AM

I know you don't need the BIOS for dual boot. I had given him two options.
I have not manage to learn, fix mbr, so i use the BIOS instead. During boot i have a shortcut key (F8) that gives me boot options so it's very easy.

Besides, i do not like dual boot. Even when you dual boot, you can only use one OS. I am not sure what's happening running a VM as i had not tried that (tried two times and failed). Some people say that running from a VM is even better than from a live CD. It keeps your OS in working mode. I only use it (bios boot) to see/check what an operating system is like, usually from a USB stick. And with the live versions that are around today you don't even need a spare OS on your computer. If something goes wrong and you cannot rescue your system, you still have to reinstall. I was trying Ubuntu within Windows (as a live CD) for two days. I could go in the internet, run it's programs, but could not save any settings like that. I have installed a spare OS on a 5GB hard disk, but i never used it. I have it there just in case. Maybe i will install a gaming OS there later on.

My disk after a month of use and fully updated is at 25GB. I did not install many programs.
My spare OS installation is using 3.5GB without any updates.
The new release of Ubuntu (11.04) is on the 28th, tomorrow. Better wait and install that.
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