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Total Linux N00B here, what to try 1st?

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  • Windows 7
  • Linux
  • Windows XP
  • Product
Last response: in Open Source Software
May 17, 2011 12:56:33 AM

okay, I read the sticky, but I need real people to come in here and give me their opinion. I'm a total N00Bster when it comes to Linux, running Windows 7, and think it's ass backwards from XP but it is much better and the most stable. Want to try Linux out of curiuosity and cuz i'm looking for work and many companies use linux OS.

thoughts, suggestions, etc..

HELP A N00BSTER OUT!

More about : total linux n00b 1st

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a b 5 Linux
May 17, 2011 2:12:58 AM

purple buzz said:
okay, I read the sticky, but I need real people to come in here and give me their opinion. . . . Want to try Linux out of curiuosity and cuz i'm looking for work and many companies use linux OS.
thoughts, suggestions, etc..

HELP A N00BSTER OUT!


Most likely are suggestions for the n00b to try either Ubuntu or LinuxMint.
I will agree should he/she be running a modern machine with 2GB RAM or more
and a multi-core processor of 1.6GHz or greater.
A laptop? Suggest peppermint One.
A netbook? Then try antiX.

First read Linux Is Not Windows.
And about MTBS.

Then join the forum associated with your linux distribution of choice. Also,
strongly consider joining a general linux forum, in addition to this one.

The three "grandfather' linux families are
a) Slackware
b) Debian
c) Redhat

Each use different package handlers,
which are methods of downloading software packages from repositories.

Debian is easiest, IMHO. antiX is Debian-based. Peppermint is ubuntu-based (almost as easy). Mint is an attractive distro that has struck out on its own and is leaning toward Debian.

Also see an article on Desktop Environments -- I favor the lighter ones, like LXDE, found in peppermint, or even lighter ones in antiX (which is majorly why it runs so well on netbooks).

Best wishes &
Welcome to Linux
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a b 5 Linux
May 17, 2011 7:48:02 PM

Debian is always good to know, and is fairly simple to learn.

If you're in a corporate environment, it's likely that RedHat is being used. CentOS is essentially the same, but free of charge. Fedora will be similar as well, but not to the extent CentOS is.


If you have a decent computer, just install VirtualBox. You can try out as many distributions as you would like this way.
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May 17, 2011 8:21:23 PM

Pyroflea said:

If you're in a corporate environment, it's likely that RedHat is being used. CentOS is essentially the same, but free of charge. .


another linux noob here, red hat isn't free?

I thought that Linux distros were, by nature, free, open source software. I know that there is the possibility (legally) to charge for the software but i didn't think anyone did. . .
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May 17, 2011 8:31:01 PM

ty all for suggestions. ima start doing my homework. im wondering though, how much space is each Linux OS takes up...?

Pyroflea said:
Debian is always good to know, and is fairly simple to learn.

If you're in a corporate environment, it's likely that RedHat is being used. CentOS is essentially the same, but free of charge. Fedora will be similar as well, but not to the extent CentOS is.


If you have a decent computer, just install VirtualBox. You can try out as many distributions as you would like this way.


my spec:

AMD Athlon II X2 255 Regor 3.1GHz Socket AM3 65W
Foxconn A76ML-K
ECS NR9800GTE-512QX-F GeForce 9800 GT 512MB 256-bit DDR3
A-DATA 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400)
CORSAIR CMPSU-400CX 400W
200G Seagate (Master)
500GB Wester Digitital SATA


thanks. i was wondering about how it would be like to try many different distributions. i'll look into installing VirtualBox.
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a b 5 Linux
May 17, 2011 8:56:50 PM

internetlad said:
another linux noob here, red hat isn't free?

I thought that Linux distros were, by nature, free, open source software. I know that there is the possibility (legally) to charge for the software but i didn't think anyone did. . .


With RedHat you pay for support essentially. There's more to it than that, but Google will be able to tell you more than I will :)  Many people often think that "Free" means free of price, but it doesn't really, technically. Again, lots of explaining, you can Google it if you're really interested ;) 

purple buzz said:
ty all for suggestions. ima start doing my homework. im wondering though, how much space is each Linux OS takes up...?



my spec:

AMD Athlon II X2 255 Regor 3.1GHz Socket AM3 65W
Foxconn A76ML-K
ECS NR9800GTE-512QX-F GeForce 9800 GT 512MB 256-bit DDR3
A-DATA 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400)
CORSAIR CMPSU-400CX 400W
200G Seagate (Master)
500GB Wester Digitital SATA


thanks. i was wondering about how it would be like to try many different distributions. i'll look into installing VirtualBox.


That computer should be able to run a few VM's no problem.

The amount of space used varies greatly. It's usually possible to install a Linux distribution in <4GB however. The "Required Specifications" page on pretty much every distribution's website will tell you more accurately what's needed.
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May 18, 2011 11:01:03 AM

I'm new to Linux too. I like using Ubuntu. Day to day it doesn't feel that different to using Windows. It's just the configuration that is significantly different.
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May 19, 2011 10:46:03 PM

Hello, I have had great luck with ubuntu but have also used fedora and MINT. I think personally that Ubuntu is the best distro to start on. The biggest reason I say this is that if you have any problems there is a million youtube tutorials. Also you can run it from a live disk just to try it out and its really easy to dualboot with windows if your not ready to take the plunge. (PS ubuntu saw removable media that fedora didn't for me) But im sure a more experienced linux user could fix that.
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a b 5 Linux
May 20, 2011 7:31:35 AM

Really when you get down to it, any distribution would be a good start. If you chose Debian (which is a tad more difficult, not really though), then you could easily use Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS, among a slew of other distributions. If you learned RedHat/CentOS, you can also use Fedora with general ease.

Which distribution you use is down to 1) Preference, and 2) What you plan on using it for.
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a b 5 Linux
May 21, 2011 2:34:52 AM

internetlad said:
Chamaecyparis one of your links is wrong (both link to peppermint)

did you mean http://antix.mepis.org/index.php?title=Main_Page#Downlo... ?


Yes, that was it -- thanks!

This new laptop keypad had me going crazy!

To the OP and others -- pyroflea seconded the notion on Debian (thanks) -- another suggestion is the new Crunchbang Statler. Many prefer the interface, and the support is very knowledgeable, too.

May all enjoy May 21!
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May 21, 2011 2:40:28 AM

chamaecyparis said:
Yes, that was it -- thanks!

This new laptop keypad had me going crazy!

To the OP and others -- pyroflea seconded the notion on Debian (thanks) -- another suggestion is the new Crunchbang Statler. Many prefer the interface, and the support is very knowledgeable, too.

May all enjoy May 21!


wow, you just reminded me. tomorrow... the end of the world is coming.
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a b 5 Linux
May 21, 2011 4:38:52 PM

purple buzz said:
wow, you just reminded me. tomorrow... the end of the world is coming.


I'm still here, don't know about you guys :D 
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May 21, 2011 5:08:04 PM

Pyroflea said:
I'm still here, don't know about you guys :D 


doomsday must be later on throughout the day.
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May 23, 2011 10:09:56 PM

maybe god slept in.
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a b 5 Linux
May 24, 2011 1:36:54 PM

Come on, we all know he runs Mac ;) 
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May 31, 2011 1:15:18 AM

Best answer selected by purple buzz.
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