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I want to start using Linux/UNIX software.

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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July 31, 2011 1:04:11 AM

As I have said in the main heading, I want to migrate form Windows to Linux.

Here is what I am looking for:

1) An OS; Just a very dependable OS. I cal learn codes and commands, just give me a dependable OS.

2) Operational: pretty self-explanatory.

3) Safe/Secure/Resourceful: The OS has to be safe and secure from malware, exploits, hacks...ect...Also, an OS that uses less resources when processing and energy while in use per kilowatt.

4) User type/Interface.: even if I need to learn code, I can. Also a smooth interface that is easy to use would be nice as well, but not Windows nice and easy. :D  You get what I mean.

i do want to use Linux, but I am unfamiliar with the use.

Please help.

Thank You,

dogman_1234
a b 5 Linux
July 31, 2011 3:25:03 AM

you could try FreeBSD, or Ubuntu they are two different Unix flavor. One uses the BSD other the Linux Kernel and come with Desktops like KDE or GNOME.

Text based OS like OpenBSD or Debian. OpenBSD is know to be the safest with the fewest security bugs. If you really want to you can add Desktop interface
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a b 5 Linux
July 31, 2011 3:50:03 AM

Hi there dogman_1234, I'll go ahead an address each point inline

dogman_1234 said:
As I have said in the main heading, I want to migrate form Windows to Linux.

Here is what I am looking for:

1) An OS; Just a very dependable OS. I cal learn codes and commands, just give me a dependable OS.


Either Linux or one of the BSDs will certainly get you this, I have a server setup running Debian and the last time it was rebooted was in order to physically move the machine, otherwise it stays up 24/7, and this is not unusual

dogman_1234 said:

2) Operational: pretty self-explanatory.


You will find for the vast majority of things that you want to do in Windows, there's a perfectly suitable analog to the software in Linux, some notable exceptions:
-Games: most of the popular games don't come to Linux, some will eventually become playable through the system API translation layer wine
-Money/finance/tax SW: oddly enough, this is another category that gets no Linux love, much more amenable to being run under wine or a VM
-Small market, specific SW: anything where the market for the software is going to be limited, a notable exception is academic/scientific/numerical programs

dogman_1234 said:

3) Safe/Secure/Resourceful: The OS has to be safe and secure from malware, exploits, hacks...ect...Also, an OS that uses less resources when processing and energy while in use per kilowatt.


While there is some truth to the fact that Linux and company don't see the level of malware that Windows sees is due in part to market constituency, it is also a fact that Linux is and has always been designed with an eye toward security (pervasive use of "least access" security models, open and responsive code review system, etc.), mostly due to it's lineage (being a unix-like system)

As far as power consumption, the nice thing about Linux is the level of control it gives you: you can dig in and, through various config files and applicaitons, cut power use significantly. That said, even out-of-the-box popular distributions are doing quite well in terms of power use (see this article)

dogman_1234 said:

4) User type/Interface.: even if I need to learn code, I can. Also a smooth interface that is easy to use would be nice as well, but not Windows nice and easy. :D  You get what I mean.

i do want to use Linux, but I am unfamiliar with the use.

Please help.

Thank You,

dogman_1234


Again, the nice thing about Linux is the sheer flexibility of the system: you can choose from dozens of UI's to use, but generally speaking most people go with one of the following:
Gnome - a classic that's been around forever, a so-called "Desktop Environment" since it provides some of the niceties that you'd expect coming from Windows (assistance dealing with media, connection to remote machines, etc.)
KDE - Also a classic that has been around about as long as Gnome, either KDE or Gnome is almost always the D.E. default for general Linux distributions
XFCE - a more recent comer, this lightweight desktop still has a lot of the utilities/functionality to make it friendly, but it will run on the lowliest of hardware (we're talking 15+ year old HW should be able to handle this desktop)
A few others that are worth mentioning: Fluxbox (my personal fave, very flexible but requires you to get your hands dirty) and Enlightenment (a shiny, kinda off-kilter desktop that appeals to some)

Hope this is a reasonable start, let us know if you have other questions.
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a b 5 Linux
July 31, 2011 3:57:43 AM

Emerald said:
you could try FreeBSD, or Ubuntu they are two different Unix flavor. One uses the BSD other the Linux Kernel and come with Desktops like KDE or GNOME.

Text based OS like OpenBSD or Debian. OpenBSD is know to be the safest with the fewest security bugs. If you really want to you can add Desktop interface


There was a bit of a kerfuffle that OpenBSD's record was due to refusing to acknowledge some issues found publicly, only to have them magically fixed later, but I will certainly agree that OpenBSD is largely considered the safest, most robust OS that's generally useable (not surprising since it's backed by Theo de Raadt, described by many as a security guru but a bit abrasive)
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July 31, 2011 5:10:36 AM

What about Ubuntu or Mint?
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a b 5 Linux
July 31, 2011 1:46:37 PM

A definitive review of linux mint debian edition (LMDE) is here
Linux Mint is very newbie-friendly and nice to look at. If not limited by system specs, any Mint edition is viable.
The biggest difference between Mint and Ubuntu is the direction each is headed and the desktop environment
each has chosen. All-in-all, mint has more going for it, IMHO, as far as ease of use out of the box and choice.
LMDE is Debian-based, obviously, and other Mints are ubuntu-based.

So, why not go with ubuntu? One word -- Unity. Another word -- schedule-based releases lead to bugs that have
plagued recent releases. Not so with 10.04 LTS. LTS means "long-term support;" it will be supported for two years.

In the past, I personally found SuperOS better out-f-the-box than standard ubuntu.

To each his/her own!
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July 31, 2011 7:09:59 PM

How do I install or replace(migrate) Linux to windows? do I need a live CD or can I just overwrite Linux on windows?
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a b 5 Linux
July 31, 2011 7:47:28 PM

I usually suggest that people new to Linux try out one or more of the more popular distributions (e.g. Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE, Linux Mint, etc.) in a virtual machine setup before installing Linux in a dual-boot setup (and/or eventually jettisoning Windows altogether)

My favorite VM software currently is VirtualBox as it has somewhat recently made huge strides in terms of user friendliness and capabilities (esp. the virtual networking and USB device capturing functionality)

But another option would be to use a LiveCD to get a feel for the OS as well without risking damage to the existing OS on disk (since it run entirely from CD/DVD), the downside here is that, without a bit of sacrificial storage media like a USB flash drive, you cannot save changes to the system such that they'll be there next time you boot the LiveCD. Another issue is that, due to the read speeds of optical media, LiveCD OS's generally are not as snappy as if it were running from a harddisk.

You may also consider using a "live USB" image as well, with improves on the performance issues and sidesteps the "read-only" issue that LiveCD images are subject to.

The ultimate answer is "the Linux installation media will allow you to replace whatever OS exists on your harddisk with Linux, and usually will provide a mechanism to allow you to dual-boot between the existing OS and the version of Linux you're installing"
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August 2, 2011 8:59:49 PM

I strongly suggest Linux Mint, i had the best experience with it, and i tested Ubuntu, Kubuntu, openSUSE, Debian and Mageia to name a few. It already comes with everything you will probably need (Browser, Mail client, instant chat client,etc) installed and neatly placed on the Menu. You can download it here, then create a Live USB or CD/DVD to install it.

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
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August 3, 2011 3:28:39 AM

I like some of the other posters, I'd say try linux mint, ubuntu or fedora. Currently using fedora and loving it right now.
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a b 5 Linux
August 3, 2011 5:50:24 AM

dogman_1234 said:
How do I install or replace(migrate) Linux to windows? do I need a live CD or can I just overwrite Linux on windows?


So, do you wish to dual-boot or get out of Windows altogether?
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August 3, 2011 4:49:51 PM

^ Get out completely.
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a b 5 Linux
August 3, 2011 6:15:07 PM

dogman_1234 said:
^ Get out completely.


Suggest downloading System Rescue CD 1.3.5 -- oldy but goody --( http://sourceforge.net/projects/systemrescuecd/files/sy... ),
burning it to CD at no more than 8X,
booting to it on the PC in question.
Hit default four or five times [Enter]
and, at the multi-colored prompt on the page that asks user
to enter either "wizard" or "startx", type in the command which
will wipe your entire hard drive with zeros --

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=4096 conv=notrunc,sync

When it's done (make a sandwich, it will take a while) you will
see some stats (four lines) ending in "xx MB/s"

Type in 'startx' at the prompt, which will bring up a yellow-
colored terminal window. In this window, at the prompt there,
type in 'gparted.'

Partition as desired, formatting most of hdd to ext4

Best wishes!
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August 8, 2011 3:28:52 AM

I would have to agree Linux Mint is a very good distro to start off with and come back to.

when i first migrated to Linux, sometime last year, one problem I had has always stuck with me which was "video flicker" when I installed the drivers for my video card 3D support, video from movies had this "flicker" to it, although it was minimal. so, I eventually decided to dual-boot Fedora for video and ubuntu for games. (I never did learn what the real problem was, but if I install the drivers for 3D support = flicker, uninstal the drivers for 3D, no flicker. so I had to have one for each, because you have to have 3D support to run games.)

Fedora was rock solid maybe too rock solid, it had a weird feel to it. like tin foil to a filling. but it worked for video. ubuntu was also very stable but it always had a 'fun' feel to it. I eventually found ubuntu studio which is a linux distro geared to audio/video production. i do play guitar and I wanted to explore the distro so I kept it for the "video platform" with out the 3D drivers. Fedora is kind of starchy and I have seen it refereed to before as not really being a 'desktop OS'. so I decided to use plain old ubuntu for games.

I have successfully played NBA2k9 and Call of Duty 4 on Linux, with wine, which is a windows compatibility layer for Linux. the easiest way to setup wine, is to use winetricks, and install .net framework 1, vcrun 2005, and directx (some would argue all you need is the .dll's but I never had any luck with it.) winetricks comes bundled with wine in the latest releases and is all very easy to use and configure. install the windows game as normal and use wine to open the .exe. just to show it is possible to run windows games on Linux with just wine.

but then there is the catch. yes you have to agree to a windows licence to install these programs with wine so migration is not 100% pure. if you want to play games on Linux you will have to integrate some element of windows. ubuntu, Fedora, and Linux Mint are some of the more polished and user friendly Linux distros available. so user friendly that I have read criticism of ubuntu being almost "windowish" it depends on what your own personal reason for leaving windows is. if it's deep and heavy I suggest reading up on the Linux philosophy and become familiar with the free software foundation. if you just want to dump windows and get on with your life ubuntu and linux mint is as easy as it comes. I wanted to break away from the "big brother sceen" windows was getting a lil too deep into. I feel like I have a private desktop and I do not worry about security anymore, unlike with windoze.

the reason for my post is, I feel your approach to migration is similar to mine, and I wanted to express the point of perspective of a less than perfect migration. with very pleasing results never the less. it is kind of a pain to dual boot just to avoid this issue and obliviously less than perfect solution. I do not fault Linux or ubuntu for this indigenously but it is an issue that is yet resolved. it might be different for different computers ect. and you will not have this problem. except I recently up graded my pc with an ASUS board, AMD 965 ect. and the problem persisted. it was the same with onboard video or my video card and I was still booting ubuntu studio/ ubuntu.

you may have heard ver 11.04 is plagued, and it is. it's so bad I gave up on ubuntu studio 11.04. I was convinced the video problem was now persistent with or without the 3D drivers.
so between the upgrade and the probs with natty i started to explore other distros. at first I tried going back to 10.04 but I could not get it to install (but that is a whole other story).
so i tried Linux Mint 11 and it was perfect. I believe it was the gnome desktop, back to perfect video. the only prob I had was Mint would freeze during login but I replaced the login background. I have not had a Problem with Linux Mint since. I have been using ubuntu for a while now and so far I must say I like Mint just a lil bit more. but i still have to dual boot Linux Mint for video ubuntu for games.

as long as you have an installable version of linux you can feel comfortable enough to switch. all you need is one good live cd and you can use it to download Linux distros and go back and forth. the Linux system has never crashed on me is very stable and user friendly. there is nothing you can do with windows that Linux cannot do and do better and nicer. with the exception of running windoze games if there ever is a problem there is always a work around or a solution. it dose take some heavy goggling to fix stuff, sometimes. but as far as the command line stuff, for the end user you can google "your_linux_distro wont or cant do this". and you will find solutions in forums that explain exactly how to do it and then its just a lot of copy and paste and finger crossing. yes, LInux can be hard sometimes but the end result is always very satisfying.

so, with my less than perfect migration. meaning that I have to dual boot to workaround my probs . the outcome of the platform(s) I have to work with is not as tidy as I would like. I still have fully migrated from windows to Linux. and I am very happy with it.

I hope this perspective from a common Linux user helps in some small way,

erly
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a b 5 Linux
August 8, 2011 5:41:23 AM

erly,

Excellent, thorough, complete response (esp. from a "just past the painful part of the learning curve" perspective), just thought I'd comment.
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a b 5 Linux
August 8, 2011 6:31:06 AM

dogman_1234 said:
Thank you.


You're welcome!
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