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D-link forum ebr-2310

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August 5, 2011 8:34:00 AM

Hello,
I recently installed Ubuntu on my computer which is partitioned with Windows XP. Prior to this install I had been using an EBR-2310 router without any problems for the XP system. After installing the Ubuntu I found I couldn't install the CD that came with the EBR-2310 and it was very slow between web sites after a few minutes even though it worked to some extent. I even went and bought a new EBR-2310 and replaced the modem thinking they were the problem. Anyone have any fixes/advice on this?
thanks

More about : link forum ebr 2310

August 6, 2011 2:21:58 PM

You don't actually need to install the software on the disk (and it's not likely to have any Linux software)

There's likely some other issue as to why performance is bad, there are some additional troubleshooting steps that are needed, this article covers some of the low-level, suitable-for-any-distro basics)
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August 14, 2011 8:15:07 PM

Thanks for you response, I have a cable router so would that make a
difference? I rec. the following from D-link and followed their
instructions exactly but it made no difference. As I had indicated, if
it's hooked up directly to the modem it works perfectly, but if I go
through the router after visiting a few different sites and after about
two minutes it stops and waits another two or three minutes before
opening the site I came to.


"Dear Randy,

We would suggest you to reset and reconfigure the router.

The following reset procedure will completely restore the default
settings on the router including your password.

Step 1: Locate the Factory Reset pinhole on the back of the unit.

Step 2: With the router powered on, press and hold the Reset button.

Step 3: Hold the Reset button for about 10-15 seconds.

Step 4: Release the Reset button.

Step 5: The device is now at factory defaults.

Now reconfigure the router.

-----Please configure the router in Dynamic mode by following the steps
mentioned below if you have a Cable Internet connection.---------

Kindly ensure your Internet Modem is connected to the Internet port of
your router and your computer is connected to port 1, 2, 3 or 4 of your
router.

Step 1 Log into the web-based configuration by typing in the IP address
of the router (default:192.168.0.1) in your web browser. The username is
admin (all lowercase) and the password is blank (nothing).

Step 2 Click the Setup tab and then click the Internet button.

Step 3 Click on the Manual Configure button.

Step 4 Dynamic IP Address is the default value, however, if Dynamic IP
Address is not selected as the WAN type, select Dynamic IP Address from
the drop down menu. Click Clone Mac Address. Click on Save Settings to
save the changes.

Step 5 Click on Status. Under WAN, Click DHCP Renew. If it does not get
an IP address or times out, then continue with Step 6.

Step 6 Power cycle the cable modem and router using the following
steps:

* Turn the cable modem off (first)
* Turn the router off
* Leave them off for 2 minutes**
* Turn the cable modem on (first)
* Wait until you get a solid cable light on the cable modem
* Turn the router on
* Wait 30 seconds
** If you have a Motorola (Surf Board) modem, leave off for at least 5
minutes.

Step 7 Follow Step 1 again to log back into the web configuration. Click
the Status tab and click the Device Info button. If you do not already
have a public IP address under the WAN heading, click on the DHCP Renew
button.

Try to access internet."
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August 14, 2011 11:50:26 PM

When your connection starts to perform poorly, you may want to check the router's logs to see if something is showing up there that could give you clues as to the root cause (to see the log, log into your router (default: 192.168.0.1 and then your username/password) then navigate to Status->Log, see page 35)
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August 15, 2011 3:30:12 AM

Have you, perchance, disabled IPv6?
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August 18, 2011 8:36:34 AM

bmouring said:
When your connection starts to perform poorly, you may want to check the router's logs to see if something is showing up there that could give you clues as to the root cause (to see the log, log into your router (default: 192.168.0.1 and then your username/password) then navigate to Status->Log, see page 35)


I did as you suggested but I'm not sure exactly what I should be looking at to determine if there is a problem somewhere?
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August 18, 2011 8:38:43 AM

chamaecyparis said:
Have you, perchance, disabled IPv6?


192.168.0.1 IPv4 is the address D-Link has given for this router, not sure what you mean?
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August 19, 2011 1:39:17 AM

earp1929 said:
I did as you suggested but I'm not sure exactly what I should be looking at to determine if there is a problem somewhere?


Basically, you're looking for any entries that sound concerning.

Also, it may help to use other wireless devices (running various OSes) to try to pinpoint where the issue resides (the wireless driver on the laptop, your router, your ISP, etc.)
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August 29, 2011 2:00:59 AM

Unfortunately, that log doesn't really tell us anything useful.

Were you able to try with a different OS and/or machine to try to narrow down the problem?
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August 29, 2011 7:57:12 AM

Yes, my computer is partitioned with Windows XP and the other computer on the D-Link router has Windows 7 neither of these has this problem. The problem is only there when I'm hooked up to the router with Ubuntu, if the cable is hooked directly to the modem Ubuntu works absolutely perfectly. What I've been doing when the other computer is not being used is just hook up directly to the modem. BTW I appreciate your input.
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August 29, 2011 2:02:06 PM

Ah, and that right there is a vital clue: what is the wireless chipset in the laptop?

If you don't know, connect the wireless and then post the output of
  1. lspci|grep -i wireless


Also, when the connection begins to suffer, you may want to see if there are any concerning log messages on the laptop by issuing
  1. dmesg|tail
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August 29, 2011 2:04:02 PM

BTW, could you edit your previous post with the log messages to shorten it up a bit, clean up this thread since it doesn't help us
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August 30, 2011 8:44:02 AM

Not sure what you mean by "edit your previous post with the log messages to shorten it up a bit" and "clean up this thread since it doesn't help us"? Also, I don't have a laptop or wireless router,
it's a desktop with a cable router.
thanks
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August 30, 2011 9:07:01 PM

earp1929 said:
Not sure what you mean by "edit your previous post with the log messages to shorten it up a bit" and "clean up this thread since it doesn't help us"?...


Log into Tom's Hardware, on the bottom-right corner of the message in question there should be some icons to edit the post (a pencil over a white page for regular edit, a lightning bolt over a gray page for a quick eidt)

earp1929 said:
...Also, I don't have a laptop or wireless router,
it's a desktop with a cable router.


My apologies, in that case my question shifts over to ask what kind of wired ethernet chipset you have, which can be gathered from
  1. bmouring@cornholio ~ $ sudo lspci|grep -i ether
  2. 00:0a.0 Bridge: nVidia Corporation CK804 Ethernet Controller (rev a3)
  3. 80:0a.0 Bridge: nVidia Corporation CK804 Ethernet Controller (rev a3)


The "check kernel messages" part stays the same
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September 2, 2011 7:45:35 AM

Your way over my head with technical abilities, still not sure what you want me to edit from the log or where and what to
to access the kernel. Here is the Ethernet info though:
Marvell Yukon 88E001/8003/8010 PCI Gigabit Ethernet controller.
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September 2, 2011 11:47:39 PM

Find out how to open the terminal for your version of Ubuntu and type in
  1. dmesg|tail
once you notice networking performance begining to suffer and post the results here.

As far as editing the log post, I was referring to clicking one of these buttons (visible when logged in)

and cleaning up your post where yo posted the output of the log
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September 3, 2011 5:46:21 AM



"D-link routers will not work with Linux, as they share the same IP Addresses," I was told by a tech.. Change the IP address of the router, perhaps.

Or buy a Netgear -- I have had no problems with the ones that say "linux" on the box. Only problem I had was with trying to get Win7 to connect with a dual-band WNDR3400 -- a Debian distro was no problem!
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September 3, 2011 1:16:01 PM

chamaecyparis said:
"D-link routers will not work with Linux, as they share the same IP Addresses," I was told by a tech..

That sounds like a tech speaking out his or her ass, if it supports RFC-1531 DHCP (which, let's face it, is every router) it is pretty much impossible for a server to assign a client the IP address it's using. Further, as far as the router's concerned, there's the DHCP traffic that negotiates IP addresses for clients (which is, more or less, OS-agnostic) and then the router just acts as a configurable pipe for network data.

It still sounds to me like a driver issue, but to be sure I'd need to see the kernel log (and maybe even a nice network capture) when the issue is seen
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September 3, 2011 3:29:17 PM

From HughesNet, what can one expect?

Thanks for the clarification, bmouring, but what you say may be above the OP's head -- must begin with something that answers the tacit question, "what is a terminal and how do I get there?" IMHO. I appreciate your efforts.

May all enjoy the long weekend!
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September 5, 2011 12:08:24 PM

Don't know how to access the terminal but I do have the following if it will help: Kernel Linux 2.6.38-11-Generic
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September 5, 2011 1:00:35 PM

If you have Ubuntu's classic interface, goto the Applicationsmenu (default location is top-left of your desktop)->Accessories->Terminal
If you have Ubuntu's unity interface, click the Ubuntu logo and begin typing "terminal"
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September 6, 2011 8:13:14 AM

Found it.

randy@randy-P5GZ-MX:~$ dmesg|tail
[ 16.536727] [drm] Initialized i915 1.6.0 20080730 for 0000:00:02.0 on minor 0
[ 16.561664] usbcore: registered new interface driver snd-usb- audio
[ 16.620718] HDA Intel 0000:00:1b.0: PCI INT A -> GSI 19 (level, low) -> IRQ 19
[ 16.620777] HDA Intel 0000:00:1b.0: irq 41 for MSI/MSI-X
[ 16.620805] HDA Intel 0000:00:1b.0: setting latency timer to 64
[ 17.536819] EXT4-fs (sda5): re-mounted. Opts: errors=remount-ro,commit=0
[ 17.777335] skge 0000:01:04.0: eth0: Link is up at 100 Mbps, full duplex, flow control both
[ 19.179927] usb 3-2: usbfs: interface 0 claimed by usblp while 'usb' sets config #1
[ 21.342288] EXT4-fs (sda5): re-mounted. Opts: errors=remount-ro,commit=0
[ 27.104062] eth0: no IPv6 routers present
randy@randy-P5GZ-MX:~$
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