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E6600 shows up as a 1.8 ghz chip?

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May 19, 2007 7:31:06 PM

On a gigabye DS4 board, new setup. Inititally, the chip is showing up as a 1.8ghz cpu, 7x 266. Is this normal? I can bump it up to 2.4 manually, but shouldn't the chip show up as a 2.4 to start with? thanks

More about : e6600 shows ghz chip

a b à CPUs
May 19, 2007 7:37:42 PM

Quote:
On a gigabye DS4 board, new setup. Inititally, the chip is showing up as a 1.8ghz cpu, 7x 266. Is this normal? I can bump it up to 2.4 manually, but shouldn't the chip show up as a 2.4 to start with? thanks


It's normal. A BIOS setting allows the chip to idle down when not under load. Disable the feature in BIOS or set the FSB manually. This has been discussed over and over for almost a year on this forum.
May 19, 2007 8:32:54 PM

Quote:
Its a power saving feature that all processors have. It can be disabled in bios.

I see this question here everyday-READ YOUR MANUAL BEFORE ASKING QUESTIONS ABOUT BIOS SETUP


Cranky today, aren't we? :wink:
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May 19, 2007 8:39:38 PM

Quote:
On a gigabye DS4 board, new setup. Inititally, the chip is showing up as a 1.8ghz cpu, 7x 266. Is this normal? I can bump it up to 2.4 manually, but shouldn't the chip show up as a 2.4 to start with? thanks


It's normal. A BIOS setting allows the chip to idle down when not under load. Disable the feature in BIOS or set the FSB manually. This has been discussed over and over for almost a year on this forum.

I would like to point out that there is no logical reason to disable this feature, unless you want to pay more per month for you energy bill.
May 19, 2007 8:42:31 PM

There is One reason to turn it off, Overclocking your processor.
a c 473 à CPUs
May 20, 2007 3:15:53 PM

Quote:
There is One reason to turn it off, Overclocking your processor.


Not necessarily. I OC my E6600 and I use Speed-Step. My clockspeed ranges between 2.0GHz to 3.0GHz. I don't need the CPU to run at 3.0GHz just to surf the net.
May 20, 2007 3:26:52 PM

Right on 8)
May 20, 2007 4:12:06 PM

I have noticed the new CPU-Z 1.40 under-reports the CPU speed!
It showed reduced speed, as if SpeedStep was engaged, but I was certain I had left my power setting as 'always on'...
Sure enough, I was in fact running full speed (which good old CPU-Z 1.38 reported accurately).
This is very unfortunate as I usually try to use the newest version of CPU-Z, LoL...
Ah, well. (progress)
L8R
May 20, 2007 4:15:54 PM

I also have an E6600 and DS4. Mine defaults to 6x multiplier and 1.6GHz when idle. The function that controls this in the BIOS is called EIST. Regards overclocking, EIST also causes voltage to be dropped, therefore it can cause problems for high overclocks. Setting the voltage manually in DS4 BIOS seems to counteract this though. I am running at 3.2GHz with EIST enabled, voltage set manually.
May 20, 2007 4:53:39 PM

Well, you are right, but do you have control of the CPU's voltage with speed step? Or is it changing dynamically?

Edit: Sorry, question already answered...
May 20, 2007 5:05:40 PM

Quote:
I also have an E6600 and DS4. Mine defaults to 6x multiplier and 1.6GHz when idle. The function that controls this in the BIOS is called EIST. Regards overclocking, EIST also causes voltage to be dropped, therefore it can cause problems for high overclocks. Setting the voltage manually in DS4 BIOS seems to counteract this though. I am running at 3.2GHz with EIST enabled, voltage set manually.


I am not a BIOS or EFI expert, but the BIOS is supposed to set up a table corresponding clock multipliers with VID (voltage ID), which get sent to the VRM. In pure IA-32 terms, this is not a problem. It just depends on BIOS and ACPI.

Speaking of all this, I have not seen anyone on this forum talk about "single core turbo mode":

http://techgage.com/article/intel_penryn_and_nehalem_ne...

This is Intel-sponsored over-clocking. 8) It's the next-best thing to "Reverse Hyperthreading."
May 20, 2007 5:58:50 PM

To clarify, what I find with my DS4 (rev. 3.3, F8 BIOS) is that when CPU voltage is set to Auto (1.325V), CPUZ reports the following:

Idle: 6x Multiplier, 1.1<something>V
Full load (TAT): 9x Multiplier, 1.2<something>V

When I keep EIST enabled, but set CPU voltage manually to 1.3375V:

Idle: 6x Multiplier, 1.3<something>V
Full load (TAT): 9x Multiplier, 1.28V

I forget the exact figures, but the point is, if CPU voltage is left to Auto, it gets dropped to 1.1<something>V when idle, whereas if CPU voltage is set manually, this is not the case, but it is actually higher when idle than under load. Here the voltage drop under load is explained by the demand placed on the motherboard and PSU, whereas in the former case the voltage is deliberately dropped when idle. I have not found anything in the BIOS that would allow the user to adjust that voltage drop.
May 20, 2007 6:10:32 PM

Quote:
There is One reason to turn it off, Overclocking your processor.


Not necessarily. I OC my E6600 and I use Speed-Step. My clockspeed ranges between 2.0GHz to 3.0GHz. I don't need the CPU to run at 3.0GHz just to surf the net.

If your going to do that, you might as well use windows app that OC's the system, which still may not be stable. I've messed with my dads MSI DOT thingy, and didn't like it one bit. :lol: 

Did you even use Prime95 or Othos to see if your OC was stable?

Beside that, just because you have your system set to run OC to 3 ghz does not mean your system is running 100 percent TDP. Or in other words using a vast amount of power. And depending on how efficient the PSU is, would also factor in perhaps power consumption.

I would say Speed Step would really show its value on a laptop, running on battery power. For the desktop, it could help the system run cooler on stock speeds. But for OC'ing intentions, it should be disabled since it can cause stability problems since in OC'ing, your putting your CPU out of its intended frequency to run.

Just my 2 cents.
May 20, 2007 6:16:49 PM

Quote:
Its a power saving feature that all processors have. It can be disabled in bios.

I see this question here everyday-READ YOUR MANUAL BEFORE ASKING QUESTIONS ABOUT BIOS SETUP


Cut the guy some slack. Not everyone follows these forums religiously. Probably thought it was misreporting, and didn't know about that BIOS feature.
May 20, 2007 6:35:10 PM

thanks for the info, I'm running 2 instances of prime95 for a stress test, and I noticed that with the supplied Easy Tune software, it is still showing the CPU at 1866 mhz, and this is with cpu usage at 100%. Shouldn't the processor speed be upp'ed to 2.4 if some kind of throttling is involved? I also noticed that the EIST option is not available in the BIOs, according to the manual, this should be enabled when a processor with EIST function is installed. During the initial post screen, the mobo detects the chip as a 6600 267x7 1.8, is that correct? The CPU does show up as a E6600 2.4 ghz under windows system property.
May 20, 2007 6:50:36 PM

Ummmm bub bub baa...

If you put the cpu under a load, it should resume it's intended stock speed. In your case, 2.4 ghz.

Have you used CPU-Z? It also should tell you with more info.

Try running the Prime95 loads first, then bring up CPU-Z.
May 20, 2007 7:17:28 PM

running 2 instance of prime95, cpu-z is reporting the core speed as 1866 under max load. Is the lack of EIST option in the mobo Bios a sign of problem?
May 20, 2007 7:31:27 PM

Odd...

Well I download your manual for DS4. In your bios, there is a setting for C1E and EIST which should be under 'Advanced BIOS Features'.

Quote:
CMOS Setup Utility-Copyright (C) 1984-2006 Award Software
Advanced BIOS Features
a c 473 à CPUs
May 20, 2007 7:40:47 PM

Quote:


Did you even use Prime95 or Othos to see if your OC was stable?



I used two instances of Prime95 to verify system stability when I built my rig last. year. It is stable

Quote:

Beside that, just because you have your system set to run OC to 3 ghz does not mean your system is running 100 percent TDP. Or in other words using a vast amount of power. And depending on how efficient the PSU is, would also factor in perhaps power consumption.


I really don't think anyone would want their CPU run at 100% TDP; even when overclocked.

My rig uses the Seasonic S12 500 PSU. 'Nuff said.
May 20, 2007 7:40:55 PM

thanks for the prompt replies, I do see the enhance halt feature, but the EIST feature is missing. I'll try to get the latest Bio from Gigabyte, but it seems the only update from the original was for a older ram compatibility issue.
May 20, 2007 7:44:59 PM

thanks for the prompt replies, I do see the enhance halt feature, but the EIST feature is missing. I'll try to get the latest Bio from Gigabyte, but it seems the only update from the original was for a older ram compatibility issue.
May 20, 2007 7:45:38 PM

When you're on the main BIOS screen, press Ctrl-F1. This will unlock otherwise hidden settings. The E6600 should have a mutiplier of 9x on full speed, 6x when idle. In the BIOS it should show as 9x. The 7x multiplier you are getting is weird. Once you have pressed Ctr-F1, you should be able to adjust the multiplier in the BIOS between 6x, 7x, 8x and 9x. It almost sounds like someone has disabled EIST and set the multiplier to 7x in the BIOS. Weird. Was the board new when you got it?
May 20, 2007 7:49:17 PM

Quote:


Did you even use Prime95 or Othos to see if your OC was stable?



I used two instances of Prime95 to verify system stability when I built my rig last. year. It is stable

Quote:

Beside that, just because you have your system set to run OC to 3 ghz does not mean your system is running 100 percent TDP. Or in other words using a vast amount of power. And depending on how efficient the PSU is, would also factor in perhaps power consumption.


I really don't think anyone would want their CPU run at 100% TDP; even when overclocked.

My rig uses the Seasonic S12 500 PSU. 'Nuff said.

Well.. I use a P3 kill-o-watt meter.

My P4 3.0 northwood core is 89watts TDP.

My dads C2D is 65watts TDP.

On idle, the wattage measure on both systems:

P4 3.0 ghz = 115watts
E4300 @ 2.4 ghz = 113watts

When the CPU (only) is under load:

P4 3.0 ghz = 180-190 watts (prime95 most heat)
E4300 @ 2.4ghz = 160-162watts (TAT worklevel 100 percent both cores)

To me... I'd hardly say speed step is going to impact the electric bill by that much.

And what I meant by 100 % TDP, is that running just a web browser is not going to do that. It shouldn't break a sweat. However if your running games 2-5 hour straight, thats a different story, and I don't think you'd want your CPU to run 2.0ghz so you can enjoy the benefits of a lighter electric bill.
a c 473 à CPUs
May 20, 2007 8:21:19 PM

Quote:


To me... I'd hardly say speed step is going to impact the electric bill by that much.



It more about heat than the bill.

Quote:

However if your running games 2-5 hour straight, thats a different story, and I don't think you'd want your CPU to run 2.0ghz so you can enjoy the benefits of a lighter electric bill.


Since SpeedStep ramps up the clockspeed as necessary, as soon as a game is loaded, the clock multiplier will max out.
May 20, 2007 8:27:49 PM

Quote:


To me... I'd hardly say speed step is going to impact the electric bill by that much.



It more about heat than the bill.

Refer to my first reply to you. Your just repeating what I said. Laptops would benefit the most. Desktops would run cooler, but I would not say that much cooler.

Quote:

However if your running games 2-5 hour straight, thats a different story, and I don't think you'd want your CPU to run 2.0ghz so you can enjoy the benefits of a lighter electric bill.


Since SpeedStep ramps up the clockspeed as necessary, as soon as a game is loaded, the clock multiplier will max out.

Again, your basically stating the same exact point I was saying. In running just a web browser, it really should not matter much with speed step enabled or not. Not to mention when running games your video card ends up causing more power to be used.

But hey... if you want to use speed step.. the go for it. I don't believe it really matters that much for a desktop user.

Edit:

However I do believe it matters if your OC'ing for stability.
May 20, 2007 9:14:27 PM

If you're not overclocking the cpu then leave the feature alone. This saves you power and not to mention it can be quite and cool. As the feature called. So unless it's making any stability keep this useful settings.
May 20, 2007 10:43:50 PM

Ok, i have the exact same board, revision, bios revision and cpu. The first time i installed it was with bios f7 which i upgraded to f8 as soon as i had win xp load for the first time. I had not any of the issues you are describing. But my first move directly after building the tower was boot, hit del and disable all EIST, speedstep etc, etc in bios. My cpu was set at multi 9 by default. After the first successful boot of win xp i updated the bios and directly set my overclocking parameters 9X333, voltage 1.25 (which i have since lowered to 1,225), default voltage for everything else. Tested Orthos 24h no problem. Temperatures 44c idle (TAT) 56c load. Ambient 24c. Using it for video editing and the occasional STALKER without as much as a hickup. Full configuration is in my sig.

What i'm getting at is: disable all fancy INTEL acronyms from BIOS, set your memory at 2 (running 1:1 that is) and see what happens. If you get a positive result and you really need EIST or Speed step or whatever, start enabling one by one and test after each change. VERY IMPORTANT. Perform a single setting change at a time, test, post the results.

Theoretical conversations can last forever...
May 20, 2007 10:49:07 PM

I see you have some good intentions, but I think he's just trying to make his machine work correctly with speed step, from what I'm understanding.

What your asking him to do, is OC his system, which he may not want.

Also, he should go by Wusy's C2D over clocking guide if he is to attempt it.
May 20, 2007 10:57:59 PM

Quote:
running 2 instance of prime95, cpu-z is reporting the core speed as 1866 under max load. Is the lack of EIST option in the mobo Bios a sign of problem?


Yes it may be. Did you buy a retail version of 6600? Tell us more about your system anyway. Especially cpu and memory details. If you have kept the box of your cpu (and if it came in one :lol: ) post the strange numbers that are printed on top of it. We need info in order to help you!
May 21, 2007 12:21:41 AM

No, i am not suggesting that he should overclock his system. I just desribe what i did and my results. Then in the second paragraph i do suggest a step by step troubleshooting approach. Unless you think that setting the memory 1:1 could be considered overclocking :lol:  And i quote myself :tongue:

"What i'm getting at is: disable all fancy INTEL acronyms from BIOS, set your memory at 2 (running 1:1 that is) and see what happens. If you get a positive result and you really need EIST or Speed step or whatever, start enabling one by one and test after each change. VERY IMPORTANT. Perform a single setting change at a time, test, post the results."
May 21, 2007 12:29:52 AM

Quote:
No, i am not suggesting that he should overclock his system. I just desribe what i did and my results. Then in the second paragraph i do suggest a step by step troubleshooting approach. Unless you think that setting the memory 1:1 could be considered overclocking :lol:  And i quote myself :tongue:

"What i'm getting at is: disable all fancy INTEL acronyms from BIOS, set your memory at 2 (running 1:1 that is) and see what happens. If you get a positive result and you really need EIST or Speed step or whatever, start enabling one by one and test after each change. VERY IMPORTANT. Perform a single setting change at a time, test, post the results."


Err... if he is running DDR2 533 memory, it would be running at a 1:1 ratio for stock speeds. Faster memory is OCing the CPU at 1:1 ratio.

266x9=2.4ghz
333x9=3ghz
400x9=3.6ghz

I don't recall what memory the OP is using, but to understand what I'm seeing in what your saying:

DDR2 667 1:1 ratio = E6600 2.4 stock OC to 2.997 or 3Ghz
DDR2 800 1:1 ratio = E6600 2.4 stock OC to 3.6 ghz

So if I miss what memory type he is using (meaning DDR2 533).. I appologise.

If he's using faster DDR2 memory then 533, and making a 1:1 ratio... then your wrong. :tongue:
May 21, 2007 12:43:00 AM

C'mon, you understand that i mean to run his memory at stock FSB speed. He didn't mention any memory speed, or anything else about his system and that's why i ask him to give us more details. You have a point there and some good intentions too :wink: but we are all trying to help, not start flame wars or show off egos. It just happens that i have the same mobo, revision, bios revision and cpu as i mentioned earlier and want to give him some data to begin troubleshooting with.
If it is correct what is said about good intentions we are all headed for hell :lol: 
May 21, 2007 12:47:22 AM

Since the OP didn't state what memory speed hes using, and going with an E6600, I would think he'd be running DDR2 800 like allot of people. And running that at a 1:1 ratio is basically OC'ing.

I wasn't trying to start an intentional flame war with you or anyone.

You stuck yer tongue at me first, so I thought I'd even that out. :mrgreen:
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 12:55:08 AM

Quote:
There is One reason to turn it off, Overclocking your processor.


Not necessarily. I OC my E6600 and I use Speed-Step. My clockspeed ranges between 2.0GHz to 3.0GHz. I don't need the CPU to run at 3.0GHz just to surf the net.

heh same here - idle at 2.4ghz (STOCK!), power on at 3200!
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 12:55:54 AM

Quote:
On a gigabye DS4 board, new setup. Inititally, the chip is showing up as a 1.8ghz cpu, 7x 266. Is this normal? I can bump it up to 2.4 manually, but shouldn't the chip show up as a 2.4 to start with? thanks


mind you if your boards doesnt support FSB-1066 then 1.8 would be the max speed (FSB-800) ;) 

make sure it is running at 1066
May 21, 2007 1:01:24 AM

I stuck my tongue at myself for quoting... myself. Is self sarcasm so rare nowadays that can be so easily misunderstood?

Ok then, glad we got it out of our systems.
Now, what would you suggest flyingmachine should do in order to troubleshoot correctly? For all we know he might have a preproduction cpu (worst case scenario). I hope he posts more details so we can really help...
May 21, 2007 1:09:12 AM

Quote:
mind you if your boards doesnt support FSB-1066 then 1.8 would be the max speed (FSB-800) ;) 

make sure it is running at 1066


The specific model and revision supports up to 1333 Mhz. He mentions EIST not appearing in BIOS though. Any ideas?
May 21, 2007 1:10:39 AM

Not sure.. perhaps some of those settings are just hidden from him, not pressing the right F# button, and some of the features might be disabled causing the system not to adjust right.

I know I have to hit F5 on a certain page for C1E to show up.

But GL to the OP on that.
May 21, 2007 1:14:27 AM

Quote:
There is One reason to turn it off, Overclocking your processor.


Not necessarily. I OC my E6600 and I use Speed-Step. My clockspeed ranges between 2.0GHz to 3.0GHz. I don't need the CPU to run at 3.0GHz just to surf the net.

heh same here - idle at 2.4ghz (STOCK!), power on at 3200!

Curious.. are you guys sure it stable?

I don't mean to sound blunt but if your want lower temps and power consumption, why are you guys OC'ing?

And why does the C2D over clocking guide tell people to disable it?

Edit:

Hmmmm... I may have to retest my dad's rig to see if E4300 will run that way.
May 21, 2007 1:19:48 AM

sorry about the lack of details, the rams I'm using are the OCZ "sli rated" (whatever that means) 8500 memory, they are suppose to be good to 1066. As I recall the stepping of the CPU is 5 or 6, manufacturing date was April 2007? The EIST option did not show up on the page as stated in the manual. I'll give F5 and Ctrl-F1 a try as recommended. Unfortunately, I'm not in front of my computer and parts right now (trying to fix a overheating motorcycle). Really appreciate all the help guys, my original goal was to push it to 3.2 and call it a day. Will post updates when i get home. Thanks,
May 21, 2007 1:26:12 AM

It might not work with allendale cores. Most E6600s can operate, as per intel specsheets, with core voltage:0.850V-1.3525V. My 6600 Oc'd @3000 can run even with 1.185V, but i hadn't the time to test the system with orthos for another 24h. With such a flexible chip even speedstep+oc might work correctly!
May 21, 2007 1:48:46 AM

Are you sure you don't have an E6300? :?
It has a 7x multi and is 1.8Ghz. 8O
Where did you get your CPU?
May 21, 2007 1:49:00 AM

Quote:
It might not work with allendale cores. Most E6600s can operate, as per intel specsheets, with core voltage:0.850V-1.3525V. My 6600 Oc'd @3000 can run even with 1.185V, but i hadn't the time to test the system with orthos for another 24h. With such a flexible chip even speedstep+oc might work correctly!


hmmm.. I know Wusy has supposively left the forumz a long while back, so I guess he just not around to update it perhaps on additional tips.

I was under the impression that speed step should be disabled. I'm not OCing my dad's system to 3 ghz, which it should handle. 2.4ghz is good enough, but I never really thought about testing the system with speed step turned back on. Might give it a shot to see if the allendale will stay stable with prime95 and Othos.

Its just a couple of enables, and turn on the heat for 6 hours before summer really kicks in.
May 21, 2007 2:13:41 AM

Quote:
I was under the impression that speed step should be disabled. I'm not OCing my dad's system to 3 ghz, which it should handle. 2.4ghz is good enough, but I never really thought about testing the system with speed step turned back on. Might give it a shot to see if the allendale will stay stable with prime95 and Othos.

Its just a couple of enables, and turn on the heat for 6 hours before summer really kicks in.


I was under the same impression, following the generic advice. I will give it a try too. Maybe we even solve flyingmachine's problem by playing around.

If it works, the reward will be lower temps and longer cpu life. Not that 4300's should have any problem running @2.4. If you overclock an e4300@2.4 with the e6600's stock cooler it gives the exact same temps as the e6600@stock!
May 21, 2007 2:57:52 AM

It might be a lil early to say this... but

WOWWzers

:lol: 

I ended up turning speed step and C1E on and notice the speed was at 1.6 ghz. Temps did reflect about 4c (cooler/idle) difference, but I didn't let it sit at idle too long, so it could have got more cooler then that. Vcore was at 1.17 :shock:

So far it looks promising, Prime95 has been running for 1:15 mins so far, at 2.4 speed.

I suppose I followed the guide to a tee and didn't think much of speed step, thinking it would cause it to stall or freeze from adjusting the fsb too much. Well, from 1.6 to 2.4 OC wouldn't fluctuate too much... I guess.

My apologizes to those 2, if those were stable OC with speed step enabled.

Edit:

So far so good, almost 1:30 mins. I guess I had a stable OC without speed step, and it should still be stable with it enabled. Its just a matter of letting my dad do his thing and let him tell me if he experiences any problems later on. :lol: 

But I'll try to make it run 6 hours... which should be 3 this morning :shock: :cry: 
May 21, 2007 4:55:31 AM

Quote:
No, i am not suggesting that he should overclock his system. I just desribe what i did and my results. Then in the second paragraph i do suggest a step by step troubleshooting approach. Unless you think that setting the memory 1:1 could be considered overclocking :lol:  And i quote myself :tongue:

"What i'm getting at is: disable all fancy INTEL acronyms from BIOS, set your memory at 2 (running 1:1 that is) and see what happens. If you get a positive result and you really need EIST or Speed step or whatever, start enabling one by one and test after each change. VERY IMPORTANT. Perform a single setting change at a time, test, post the results."


Err... if he is running DDR2 533 memory, it would be running at a 1:1 ratio for stock speeds. Faster memory is OCing the CPU at 1:1 ratio.

266x9=2.4ghz
333x9=3ghz
400x9=3.6ghz

I don't recall what memory the OP is using, but to understand what I'm seeing in what your saying:

DDR2 667 1:1 ratio = E6600 2.4 stock OC to 2.997 or 3Ghz
DDR2 800 1:1 ratio = E6600 2.4 stock OC to 3.6 ghz

So if I miss what memory type he is using (meaning DDR2 533).. I appologise.

If he's using faster DDR2 memory then 533, and making a 1:1 ratio... then your wrong. :tongue:
For the record guys, setting the memory to 1:1 ratio doesn't overclock the CPU by itself and is perfectly reasonable to do even if the RAM is high speed. If the memory's rated speed is faster than the FSB at 1:1, the RAM underclocks itself to match, rather than the CPU overclocking. It's true that to utilize fast RAM at the RAM's rated speed wth 1:1 overclocking is required, but the RAM doesn't have to run at rated speed. In fact, some DDR2-667 and DDR2-800 RAM use the same memory ICs but raise the voltage and loosen the timings to make it into the higher speed. In a lot of cases, using DDR2-800 (or higher) RAM at 533 or 667 speeds will allow it to run with tightened timings and/or reduced voltage. In CPU-Z, take a look at the 'SPD' tab and you can see the manufacturer's preset timings at various speeds (if they bothered to put them in for all speeds). For example here's the various timings for my cheapo DDR2-667 RAM (useable thanks to the 10x multiplier on the E6700). You can see that if I was running the stock 266("1066") FSB the RAM would be 4-4-4-12 instead of the 5-5-5-15 it is advertised at 333(DDR2 667) with.

Also, regarding speedstep, I leave it on with my system, which is overclocked a pretty decent amount, and get no problems. It's run Orthos and dual P95 for about eight hours consecutively each for stress testing with perfect stability. I do run the voltage in manual mode and a side effect is that it doesn't drop when the multi is lowered, but I do that because the motherboard seems to default to 1.425 Volts for the 366 base frequency if I leave the voltage on 'auto' so I override it to take advantage of the CPU's stability down to 1.3 V. Keeping the full speed voltage down pays off much more under load than the auto voltage does at idle. It still seems to drop 2 degrees off the idle temp to let the multi drop (and that's with good cooling already, Thermalright U120). In fact the CPU ends up essentially at ambient temperature at idle with speedstep on - the heatsink is actually cold to the touch, too bad I can't say the same for the northbridge heatsink, that one is painfully hot.
May 21, 2007 5:31:57 AM

Quote:
For the record guys, setting the memory to 1:1 ratio doesn't overclock the CPU by itself and is perfectly reasonable to do even if the RAM is high speed. If the memory's rated speed is faster than the FSB at 1:1, the RAM underclocks itself to match, rather than the CPU overclocking. It's true that to utilize fast RAM at the RAM's rated speed wth 1:1 overclocking is required, but the RAM doesn't have to run at rated speed. In fact, some DDR2-667 and DDR2-800 RAM use the same memory ICs but raise the voltage and loosen the timings to make it into the higher speed. In a lot of cases, using DDR2-800 (or higher) RAM at 533 or 667 speeds will allow it to run with tightened timings and/or reduced voltage. In CPU-Z, take a look at the 'SPD' tab and you can see the manufacturer's preset timings at various speeds (if they bothered to put them in for all speeds). For example here's the various timings for my cheapo DDR2-667 RAM (useable thanks to the 10x multiplier on the E6700). You can see that if I was running the stock 266("1066") FSB the RAM would be 4-4-4-12 instead of the 5-5-5-15 it is advertised at 333(DDR2 667) with.


Yes, I'd like to respond to that comment.... Ummm... what? (does his caveman impression :lol: )

So, how do I get a 1:1 ratio with having the CPU at stock speed with for say DDR2 667 ram? I guess I'm still missing something here.

My dad's E4300 and DDR2 667 is at a ratio of 11:14 (but it is OC to 2.4). So.. how do I get it to 1:1 without OC CPU? Reduce or tighten the timings? If that so, I guess I was over locked in the math in determining speeds with the cpu and memory.

I can understand the timings can do some tweaking in squeezing out some extra performance, but the difference is so little from what I understand. Although DDR2 667 can out perform DDR2 1181 from one article I read. So would the timings also change or effect the ratio?

Edit: here's my CPU-Z validation

Prolly will re-submit it once I finish my Prime test.

So for E4300 it being an 800FSB cpu, if i change the timings to the 200mhz table, then it will be 1:1 ratio at stock speed?

Quote:
Also, regarding speedstep, I leave it on with my system, which is overclocked a pretty decent amount, and get no problems. It's run Orthos and dual P95 for about eight hours consecutively each for stress testing with perfect stability. I do run the voltage in manual mode and a side effect is that it doesn't drop when the multi is lowered, but I do that because the motherboard seems to default to 1.425 Volts for the 366 base frequency if I leave the voltage on 'auto' so I override it to take advantage of the CPU's stability down to 1.3 V. Keeping the full speed voltage down pays off much more under load than the auto voltage does at idle. It still seems to drop 2 degrees off the idle temp to let the multi drop (and that's with good cooling already, Thermalright U120). In fact the CPU ends up essentially at ambient temperature at idle with speedstep on - the heatsink is actually cold to the touch, too bad I can't say the same for the northbridge heatsink, that one is painfully hot.


Testing that atm, and its looking okay so far. Man, that NB does get pretty hot... I agree with ya on there.
a c 473 à CPUs
May 21, 2007 5:53:08 AM

Quote:
There is One reason to turn it off, Overclocking your processor.


Not necessarily. I OC my E6600 and I use Speed-Step. My clockspeed ranges between 2.0GHz to 3.0GHz. I don't need the CPU to run at 3.0GHz just to surf the net.

heh same here - idle at 2.4ghz (STOCK!), power on at 3200!

Curious.. are you guys sure it stable?



Yup.

Quote:


And why does the C2D over clocking guide tell people to disable it?


I don't know, I didn't read it.
May 21, 2007 6:01:14 AM

here're the numbers from the CPU box

Batch: L646G509
Version D86342-002
Pack date: 4/03/07

I may have caused some confusion, but my mobo is a gigabyte 650i DS4, not the intel P965 one.

The CPU was bought from Amazon, good thing is, shouldn't be too tough to get a replacement. Anyways, still no EIST option available. :x
May 21, 2007 6:19:49 AM

What dealer on Amazon?
Was it a used processor?
Was the box opened?
What is printed on the CPU?
!