Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Help CPU upgrade question P4 socket 478 400 FSB 1.6 to 2.6 ?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
May 20, 2007 4:31:57 AM

Hello I have a Compaq Evo D500 that currently is a 1.6Ghz [socket 478 400 FSB]

The Compaq brochure at http://h18002.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/10946_div... shows thet when available up to a 2.2Ghz can be used

The question I have is that I see Intel also did up to 2.6Ghz in a socket 478 400 FSB, so will this work ?

I see thet the 2.6Ghz is a 0.13 micron technology wherewas the 1.6Ghz is 0.18 micron technology would this be an issue ?

Lastly would I need to upgrade the bios ?

Regards

Robert
May 20, 2007 5:15:07 AM

It could cause problems.

The 130nm Pentium 4 is a Northwood core Pentium 4. Your one is the Willamette Pentium 4 (I think***). The two may have different VRM specs and your motherboard may have compatability problems.

But seriously, it's not even worth going through the trouble to find an old Pentium 4 like that.

***Download CPU-Z to check what specific Pentium 4 revision you have.
May 20, 2007 6:33:44 AM

I believe the 2.4-2.6 400fsb is your highest ticket,and by the price of them you could almost go with a new setup(with a few more bucks of course).I have a machine that operates off sd ram pc 133 and the cheapest 2.4 400 fsb i found(just browseing) was 70 bucks(used fleabay).Where as I found a 2.8 800sb for 26 bucks for a newer IBM I'm peiceing together(which I bought)...personally I dont't see it as a good move but,pick your poisen and gl :D  .
Related resources
May 20, 2007 6:43:14 AM

i think it should work
May 20, 2007 8:18:01 AM

It should work, the BIOS could possibly not recognize the Northwood, but I doubt it. The fastest 400 fsb Processor was 2.8GHz. The 28x multiplier is the largest ever for any CPU.
May 20, 2007 11:32:13 AM

It might not work. For some reason, the older P4 motherboards don't support the newer P4s (Not the 775 sockets either).

I had a 1.7Ghz P4 on a 478 socket Mobo (MSI), and I tried to upgrade to a 2.8 Ghz, and it wasn't compatible with my motherboard. The instability of the following systems with my power supply lead me to my current PC.

Best bet would be to simply upgrade your entire system if you want no hassles. Bios flashing, especially on older Mobos, is a pain and can cause more problems than it can fix.
May 20, 2007 10:58:50 PM

Peps

Thank you for all your replies

I have ascertained that a bios upgrade is available to add support for Pentium C1 stepping microprocessors and support for Celeron B1 stepping microprocessors. Compaq definately says it supports 2.2 but it now looks like in theory I could go up to a 2.8 since that is the fastest 400 FSB processor

I also run cpu-z which said my P4 1.6 processor is a williamette and oddly 3v [from what I can tell all P4 1.6 are 1.75v] and that it has D0 core stepping

1. What is the difference between a Williamette and Northwood and why would that be an issue ?

2. If my current processor is D0 and the bios upgrade supports C1 should I make sure any new processor is either D0 or C1 ? [I see a P4 2.8 FSB 400 is D1]

3. Some else mentioned to me that the 845 chipset also supports 533Mhz is this true ?

4. Is removing the heat sink/fan and replacing the processor a low risk procedure and would I need some new glue ?

Regards
May 21, 2007 12:28:06 AM

Quote:
...
I have ascertained that a bios upgrade is available to add support for Pentium C1 stepping microprocessors and support for Celeron B1 stepping microprocessors.

Unfortunately, you need to know which *core version* of the P4 that stepping applies to. Stepping numbers are specific to each core version; does the C1 stepping refer to a Willamette P4 or a Northwood P4?
...
Quote:
...
1. What is the difference between a Williamette and Northwood and why would that be an issue ?

They are different CPU designs and use different voltages, power, etc. They may also have slight differences in microcode and other things that require specific BIOS support.
Here's some wiki info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_4#Willamette

Quote:
...
2. If my current processor is D0 and the bios upgrade supports C1 should I make sure any new processor is either D0 or C1 ?

No, to be 100% sure you need to be sure that the new CPU uses the same or earlier design as what the BIOS supports. So, if the BIOS upgrade supports Northwood stepping C1, you should be able to use any Willamette (earlier design) or any C1 or earlier stepping Northwood. In practice, it may turn out that later Northwood steppings also work.

Quote:
...
4. Is removing the heat sink/fan and replacing the processor a low risk procedure and would I need some new glue ?

Yes it's low risk, and yes, you would need to remove the old thermal compound (not glue!) and apply fresh compound before reinstalling the CPU cooler. Many people like Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound; it costs less than $10/tube and is widely available.
May 21, 2007 1:09:46 AM

Quote:

Unfortunately, you need to know which *core version* of the P4 that stepping applies to. Stepping numbers are specific to each core version; does the C1 stepping refer to a Willamette P4 or a Northwood P4?


Mondoman thank you for your reply

From what I can tell a williamette P4 only when up to 1.7Ghz and since Compaq state support for up to 2.2Ghz on my PC, I suspect that Northwood P4 is supported but I do agree detail on what stepping would be more ideal

I wonder how much difference a 2.2 or greater e.g. a max of 2.8 would make compared to the existing 1.6 for general use i.e. browsing, some video etc ?
May 21, 2007 3:19:15 AM

Normally, CPUs are not really cost-effective upgrades unless you are at least doubling the speed.
Expanding RAM is normally the most cost-effective improvement, especially if you are only running 1GB of RAM or less now.

Your system is so old that even finding the right type of RAM for it may be cost-prohibitive compared with just getting a whole new system. For example, DDR2 RAM is currently selling for around $40/GB, while DDR RAM is roughly double that price, and older PC-100/133 is even more expensive.
May 21, 2007 4:12:18 AM

Mondoman

FYI the system is a P4 1.6 with 256Mb of PC133 ram running WK2 SP4

Not often at 100% CPU except when playing video media and then that still runs ok [not noticable jitter] and not often does the machine use more than 256Mb ie disk swapping

I can pick up a P4 2.2 for US$35 down here, I am also considering overclocking but haven't yet ascertained whether this can be done on this Compaq unit
May 21, 2007 2:21:33 PM

My suggestion was an upgrade on a system,You could pickup a Brisbane and a cheap motherboard(and DDR2).Or like myself,go 939(which are really cheap right now)and I'm useing my old memory(but in your case your running pc133 probably)...It's almost worth upgradeing your system,but I don't know how knowledgeable you are(even though it's pretty easy and everybody here would help you out if you needed it)...Just some thoughts,gl :D  .
May 21, 2007 4:22:14 PM

Quote:
...
I have ascertained that a bios upgrade is available to add support for Pentium C1 stepping microprocessors and support for Celeron B1 stepping microprocessors.

Unfortunately, you need to know which *core version* of the P4 that stepping applies to. Stepping numbers are specific to each core version; does the C1 stepping refer to a Willamette P4 or a Northwood P4?
...
Quote:
...
1. What is the difference between a Williamette and Northwood and why would that be an issue ?

They are different CPU designs and use different voltages, power, etc. They may also have slight differences in microcode and other things that require specific BIOS support.
Here's some wiki info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_4#Willamette

Quote:
...
2. If my current processor is D0 and the bios upgrade supports C1 should I make sure any new processor is either D0 or C1 ?

No, to be 100% sure you need to be sure that the new CPU uses the same or earlier design as what the BIOS supports. So, if the BIOS upgrade supports Northwood stepping C1, you should be able to use any Willamette (earlier design) or any C1 or earlier stepping Northwood. In practice, it may turn out that later Northwood steppings also work.

Quote:
...
4. Is removing the heat sink/fan and replacing the processor a low risk procedure and would I need some new glue ?

Yes it's low risk, and yes, you would need to remove the old thermal compound (not glue!) and apply fresh compound before reinstalling the CPU cooler. Many people like Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound; it costs less than $10/tube and is widely available.

To answer some of these questions with definate answers, the C1 is referring to Northwood core CPUs. No Williamette ever had C1 stepping, and I'm fairly sure that no Prescott did either. Anyway, it doesn't really matter. Presscotts were never made for the 400fsb.

As to the question of why a Northwood might need a bios update/not be compatible, it's simply whether or not the manufacture programed the bios to recognize a Northwood CPU (microcode). The Northwood ran at lower vcore, and had double the L2 cache. It did, however, use the exact same VRM and VID spec as Williamette, meaning that every socket 478 board should support BOTH Williamette and Northwood, providing the Bios has been updated to recognize the Northwood core CPUs.
May 21, 2007 10:09:50 PM

Thanks for the info, jf!

For the OP, with only 256MB of RAM, adding RAM to your system will definitely be the cheapest and easiest performance boost. You should be able to find 256MB of PC133 SDRAM (512MB system total) for less than the cost of the CPU upgrade. If you can find 512MB (768MB system total) instead for a good price, I'd go for that.
May 22, 2007 12:35:47 AM

Gentlemen

I successfully upgraded the bios last light that supports C1 stepping, as mentioned previously this must be for Northwood since Compaq state the machine supports up to 2.2Ghz and williamette only went up to 1.7Ghz

You think increasing the RAM will make a significant difference, I say that because it is not often that the memory useage gets near 256Mb

Dare I ask is overclocking a P4 1.6 an option ?!

ps: after upgrading the bios I didn't see any option to change bus speed
May 22, 2007 3:41:57 AM

Quote:
Gentlemen

I successfully upgraded the bios last light that supports C1 stepping, as mentioned previously this must be for Northwood since Compaq state the machine supports up to 2.2Ghz and williamette only went up to 1.7Ghz

You think increasing the RAM will make a significant difference, I say that because it is not often that the memory useage gets near 256Mb

Dare I ask is overclocking a P4 1.6 an option ?!

ps: after upgrading the bios I didn't see any option to change bus speed


You only have 256mb of RAM? Upgrading it even to 512mb would be a drastic jump. Though I'd say it isn't economical to put any more money into this computer, 1GB would give you a tremendous boost in performance.
May 22, 2007 11:07:57 PM

If you currently have 256MB of ram, you might have enough. Really, it all depends on what programs you currently run on this computer. With only 256MB of ram, it won't be playing the latest games, but I doubt that is of any concern to you anyway. 256MB of ram will certainly be able to run Windows XP SP2 without page filing. I use two 128MB sticks of PC100 ram in my everyday computer, an HP with an 800MHz Celeron. Even though I only have 256MB of ram, I can easily use Office 2000 applications, surf the internet with IE of Firefox, play DVDs or listen to MP3s. Even light multitasking is acceptable. 256MB of ram is acceptable to basic tasks without risk of pagefiling. If you fall into that catagory, don't worry about the ram. However, if you run any more ram-intensive programs, such as any video editing application, Photoshop, modern games, or if you may be the type who has many start up applications running all the time in the task bar (in my HP computer, my taskbar consists of a spell checker and zone alarm fire wall), then you should consider upgrading to 512MB of ram (two 256MB sticks).


Just an FYI: the fastest Williamette CPU is at least 2.0GHz, and I believe I may have seen a 2.1 or 2.2 GHz unit as well, but I'm not certain of that. I at least know there were wiliamettes up to 2.0GHz. My Dell 4500 originally came with a 1.8GHz Williamette CPU.
May 25, 2007 11:01:14 PM

Gentlemen

My current P4 1.6Ghz 400 FSB socket 478 has a 1.75 core voltage

I noted that the voltages vary above 2.0Ghz for P4 400 FSB eg

A 2.6 SL6PP that I am considering has a 1.53v core voltage and a 2.0 has 1.5v etc

Does the core voltage have to be the same as my old processor ?
May 26, 2007 3:42:09 AM

The core voltage doesn't have to be the same, but your MB DOES have to be able to supply the correct voltage for the new CPU. If it doesn't recognize it, it might not do so properly.
!