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Cable cards, built in receivers....

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Anonymous
January 2, 2005 12:41:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a lot of gripes and
bitches about the cable cards. Also, ppv and menu channels are not
available. Do you think this option is a little too "new" to be fully
utilized?

Built in receivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits? Isn't
it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as things change?
I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have cable with locals
already on?

Thanks

Don
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 1:27:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I like the integrated tuner as it simplifies the operation of the TV. I do
not like external boxes either. Especially Time Warner cable boxes as I
have found that my set could always do a better job tuning the channel.
Here is a case in point for an HD receiver. Five years ago, I bought an HD
capable 60" 4:3 Toshiba set. Soon after that, I bought an external HD box
for OTA. I have no plans to upgrade that HD box nor do I have a reason to
do that. This combination is still useful and utilized.

Last month, I bought a Sony 50" Grand Wega with a built-in tuner. This set
is far superior to my Toshiba. The operation of it is very simple and I do
not need external boxes. Granted, I am not interested in PPV. I may
upgrade my service to use the cable card and I know that it can be made to
work and work well.

My point is that I used to believe in upgrading a set top box down the road
which is why I went the separate route the first time. By the time you are
ready to upgrade a tuner, you will probably be wanting to upgrade the TV so
why not do it together. The operation of the set is so much simpler and you
have less clutter around the set.

Many people have different opinions on this subject and they are valid for
their circumstance. This is what fits me best.

Jeff


"M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a lot of gripes and
> bitches about the cable cards. Also, ppv and menu channels are not
> available. Do you think this option is a little too "new" to be fully
> utilized?
>
> Built in receivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits?
> Isn't it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as things
> change? I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have cable
> with locals already on?
>
> Thanks
>
> Don
>
>
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 1:49:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

One last note -- My new set (digital cable ready) is able to tune to the HD
channels provided over cable. A cable card is needed for premium content
including some HD channels. The HD channels I receive are local HD channels
provided by Time Warner.

Jeff


"Jeff Durham" <jdurham@outdoorlife.local> wrote in message
news:CSJBd.20921$IZ2.16272@fe37.usenetserver.com...
>I like the integrated tuner as it simplifies the operation of the TV. I do
>not like external boxes either. Especially Time Warner cable boxes as I
>have found that my set could always do a better job tuning the channel.
>Here is a case in point for an HD receiver. Five years ago, I bought an HD
>capable 60" 4:3 Toshiba set. Soon after that, I bought an external HD box
>for OTA. I have no plans to upgrade that HD box nor do I have a reason to
>do that. This combination is still useful and utilized.
>
> Last month, I bought a Sony 50" Grand Wega with a built-in tuner. This
> set is far superior to my Toshiba. The operation of it is very simple and
> I do not need external boxes. Granted, I am not interested in PPV. I may
> upgrade my service to use the cable card and I know that it can be made to
> work and work well.
>
> My point is that I used to believe in upgrading a set top box down the
> road which is why I went the separate route the first time. By the time
> you are ready to upgrade a tuner, you will probably be wanting to upgrade
> the TV so why not do it together. The operation of the set is so much
> simpler and you have less clutter around the set.
>
> Many people have different opinions on this subject and they are valid for
> their circumstance. This is what fits me best.
>
> Jeff
>
>
> "M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
>> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a lot of gripes
>> and bitches about the cable cards. Also, ppv and menu channels are not
>> available. Do you think this option is a little too "new" to be fully
>> utilized?
>>
>> Built in receivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits?
>> Isn't it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as
>> things change? I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have
>> cable with locals already on?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Don
>>
>>
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 10:20:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a lot of gripes and
> bitches about the cable cards. Also, ppv and menu channels are not
> available. Do you think this option is a little too "new" to be fully
> utilized?
>
> Built in receivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits?
> Isn't it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as things
> change? I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have cable
> with locals already on?

Not having the guide info on the box from the cable company is one of the
trade-offs of CableCard. Of course, the cable company COULD provide that
information for your TV set's guide if they wanted, but they don't. Notice
that when you get OTA HD broadcasts, you do get that information that
displays on your TV set guide. At least, I do.

CableCard provides noticeably better SD pictures than a cable box. Slightly
better HD pictures, although they are so good whether you get them via cable
box, OTA or CableCard, it is hard to tell.

Convenience of not having to screw around with a cable box and one more
remote is nice.

You can always have both. Run a cable box into one of your video outlets
and run cable direct into your TV where you have installed a CableCard. CC
only costs $1.75/month, or at least that is the price from TW here.

mack
austin
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 7:28:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Cable card story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/30/technology/circuits/3...

I went for the card with my TW in NYC system and I really hate the lack of
program guide. I also hate changing input from cable card cable to HD cable
box DVR. I never use the Pay For channels so that is not an issue for me.
The second card (the first did not open up most channels) works exactly as
promised, no more, no less. I highly recommend it if you do not need a
program guide, and do not use the combo cabvle box/DVR.
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:17:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In theory, the cable companies could download the program information so
that the program guides that come built into our HD TV sets would be fully
functional. But they do not, probably just to give us another reason to
keep the two-way boxes, from which they figure to make more money. Once the
cable cards (and TV sets) become 2-way, then, voila!, the guide info will
start being downloaded. (I notice that when I use my antenna connection to
pick up a station OTA, the guide info about the program shows up on my TV
set's program guide. So, the info is obviously available with the program.)

mack
austin


"S.P." <schmartypantz@yahooooo.com> wrote in message
news:lfKdnYUD05udJETcRVn-gQ@giganews.com...
> Cable card story:
> http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/30/technology/circuits/3...
>
> I went for the card with my TW in NYC system and I really hate the lack of
> program guide. I also hate changing input from cable card cable to HD
> cable box DVR. I never use the Pay For channels so that is not an issue
> for me. The second card (the first did not open up most channels) works
> exactly as promised, no more, no less. I highly recommend it if you do
> not need a program guide, and do not use the combo cabvle box/DVR.
>
>
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:19:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I thank you all for your opinions/help.

Don

"M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a lot of gripes and
> bitches about the cable cards. Also, ppv and menu channels are not
> available. Do you think this option is a little too "new" to be fully
> utilized?
>
> Built in receivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits?
> Isn't it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as things
> change? I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have cable
> with locals already on?
>
> Thanks
>
> Don
>
>
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 9:20:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

My experience justified the early decision to go by the HD set top box.
Picture quality is outstanding, equal or better on my Sony Grand Wega than
on my XBR CRT.

And why to pay for something what you should have if you are a cable
subscriber? HD tuner and descrambler are among others that are part of a
standard HD set top box. For long term, the box is more flexible solution,
because for cable you have to have one.

Additionally, nobody is taking care of simple logic like complicating TV
electronics is not the best road to reliability. Of course, throwing money
out of the window is everybody's right, lol.


"M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a lot of gripes and
> bitches about the cable cards. Also, ppv and menu channels are not
> available. Do you think this option is a little too "new" to be fully
> utilized?
>
> Built in receivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits?
> Isn't it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as things
> change? I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have cable
> with locals already on?
>
> Thanks
>
> Don
>
>
Anonymous
January 15, 2005 10:50:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

One Big problem with
just cable card,is you can't
record anything
Anonymous
January 16, 2005 6:36:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"PNeski" <pneski@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20050115145027.04844.00000014@mb-m25.aol.com...
> One Big problem with
> just cable card,is you can't
> record anything

I run cable from the wall into a splitter, then out with one half going into
my TV set's CableCard, the other half going into my Panasonic DVD / DVR, so
I can record cable shows onto the Panny's hard drive. The DVR is connected
to the TV set via component cable, into one of the video inputs. Can't
record HD, only SD.

In theory, if I had a DVR recorder that would record HD and had a cablecard
slot, then I could use this split setup to feed it and my TV. Or, perhaps,
I could run the cable into the DVR's CableCard, out a pass-through, and into
the TV's CableCard.

In a year or two, maybe I will have that.

mack
austin
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 4:14:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> In theory, if I had a DVR recorder that would record HD and had a
> cablecard slot, then I could use this split setup to feed it and my TV....
> In a year or two, maybe I will have that.

Been there, done that. Sony 60" unit. Time Warner SA 8000HD. Conclusion:
I rarely use the cable card. The lack of program card is even more of a
pain than the barely noticeable increase in resolution. I am also lazy and I
have to grab a second remote (The Sony's) to change from cable box input to
cable card input.
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 5:13:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a > lot of gripes
> and bitches about the cable cards.

You give up some functionality if you use a cable card. For instance, you
can not order on demand PPV, and must call the cable operator to order an
event or movie.

> Also, ppv and menu channels are not available. Do >you think this option
> is a little too "new" to be fully utilized?

You are making a correct assumption here. The technology is too new. For
instance, if you want DVR functionality with a cable card forget it. My
cable company does support the card, but they don;t recomend it. I for one
want DVR and optical sound. And the box they provide, which is Scientific
Atlanta 8300 HD DVR does support optical sound.

Phil

eceivers??? Need them if you have cable or not? Benefits? Isn't
> it better to have it in your box so you can upgrade easier as things
> change? I know the value if you're using ota, but what if you have cable
> with locals already on?
>
> Thanks
>
> Don
>
>
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 7:06:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Philip B Kirschner" <philk02nospam@optonline.net> wrote in message
news:GK2Hd.4472$rb7.2729@fe08.lga...
>
> "M-Tech" <mechtechllc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:BoSdnW4eSOz6wkrcRVn-oQ@comcast.com...
>> How "valuable" are they at this point? I've seen/read a > lot of gripes
>> and bitches about the cable cards.
>
> You give up some functionality if you use a cable card. For instance, you
> can not order on demand PPV, and must call the cable operator to order an
> event or movie.
>
>> Also, ppv and menu channels are not available. Do >you think this
>> option is a little too "new" to be fully utilized?
>
> You are making a correct assumption here. The technology is too new. For
> instance, if you want DVR functionality with a cable card forget it. My
> cable company does support the card, but they don;t recomend it. I for one
> want DVR and optical sound. And the box they provide, which is Scientific
> Atlanta 8300 HD DVR does support optical sound.

Well, this is just an opinion. If you do not normally use the two-way
offerings of your cable company, then the convenience and enhanced SD
reception you get from CableCard may outweigh losing the cable company's
built-in guide. We started out with a cable box but now use a CableCard. I
think it's a good trade-off, but that's my opinion, based on my experience.
Your opinion, once you have some experience each way, may differ. If you
have a CableCard slot, try it and see if you like it. It's no big deal to
go back to the box.

mack
austin
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 5:44:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 16:06:43 GMT, "Mack McKinnon"
<MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote:

>Well, this is just an opinion. If you do not normally use the two-way
>offerings of your cable company, then the convenience and enhanced SD
>reception you get from CableCard may outweigh losing the cable company's
>built-in guide. We started out with a cable box but now use a CableCard. I
>think it's a good trade-off, but that's my opinion, based on my experience.
>Your opinion, once you have some experience each way, may differ. If you
>have a CableCard slot, try it and see if you like it. It's no big deal to
>go back to the box.
>
>mack

I suspect the cable companies will embrace cable cards in the future.
Once they get the two way communication going, they could use only
cable cards and rent you one for every splitter connection you're
using.

ah capitalism .... slurp !!
!