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Intel - stopping poor children from getting computers

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May 21, 2007 12:45:10 PM

On 60 Minutes last night (the news show your grandparents watch) - about the initiative to get laptops to children in poor countries.

Here are some quotes:


Quote:

Nicholas Negroponte, a professor at MIT, had a dream. In it every child on the planet had his own computer. In that way, he figured, children from the most impoverished places – from deserts and jungles and slums could become educated and part of the modern world. Poor kids would have new possibilities.


Quote:

But lately One Laptop has had to contend with a new challenge: competition. This lab in Sao Paulo is testing two other laptops the Brazilian government is thinking of buying for school children, including one made in India and Negroponte’s biggest competitor: the Classmate by Intel, the giant chip maker.


Intel gave every student in this class in Mexico a Classmate – which Negroponte believes is part of an effort to kill him off.

At a recent lecture at MIT he accused Intel of dumping, of going to the same governments he’s trying to sell to and offering the Classmate below cost.

"Intel should be ashamed of itself," Negroponte says. "It’s just – it’s just shameless."

"Negroponte believes that you’re trying to drive him out," Stahl told Craig Barrett, Intel’s Chairman of the Board.


Quote:
... the heart of it is that the One Laptop uses chips made by AMD, Intel’s biggest competitor.

"Intel and AMD fight viciously," Negroponte says." And we’re just sort of caught in the middle."


Quote:
"Yes, Intel has hurt the mission enormously," Negroponte says.




http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/05/20/60minutes/printable2830058.shtml
May 21, 2007 1:15:31 PM

Let me see if I have your complaint correct...
1) Someone started a program to sell cheap system to third world countries in hopes of raising the computer literacy rate in those areas.
2) Another company had the audacity of offering one of those countries an even cheaper alternative.

I fail to see the problem here. It sounds like a win win situation for the kids in these areas. At a cheaper price, the governments are even more likely to go along with purchasing the systems for the kids in their countries. Hopefully, they will buy even more of them at this cheaper price. Since that is Dr. Negroponte's stated goal, what is the error? Is he just annoyed the someone else is the one to do it? Is he worried that someone may steal some of his spotlight or headlines?
May 21, 2007 1:17:49 PM

Well, only Intel fanboys are going to be surprised at this. I think most sane people have realised by now that Intel is a pretty typical corporation, and acts like a pretty typical corporation. It's got a lot of power, and it uses its power in ways that often will run contrary to the preferences of many.

The problem isn't Intel; it's the worldwide acceptance of corporate status, whereby companies are allowed the rights of an individual (a corporation is a legal person), but evade any responsibility. Sensible revision of this legal framework is a necessity (but somehow I think it might not be in certain people's interest... i.e. the people who run the world).
Related resources
May 21, 2007 1:20:55 PM

Quote:
Let me see if I have your complaint correct...
1) Someone started a program to sell cheap system to third world countries in hopes of raising the computer literacy rate in those areas.
2) Another company had the audacity of offering one of those countries an even cheaper alternative.

I fail to see the problem here. It sounds like a win win situation for the kids in these areas. At a cheaper price, the governments are even more likely to go along with purchasing the systems for the kids in their countries. Hopefully, they will buy even more of them at this cheaper price. Since that is Dr. Negroponte's stated goal, what is the error? Is he just annoyed the someone else is the one to do it? Is he worried that someone may steal some of his spotlight or headlines?


I was thinking the same thing. Sounds like he wants to be the one in the limelight. Or he's catching some major kickbacks from people to do it and is worrying about his honeydew pot drying out.
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 1:26:25 PM

I am such a cynic. I was wondering how long this would take to happen. When I first heard about the $100 laptop and the One Laptop Per Child effort, I figured it was only a matter of time before some large corporation decided to railroad a true humanitarian effort for their own gain. Shame it had to be Intel

Negroponte is the unwilling collateral damage of big business. I don't gather it's a personal thing against Negroponte, but I can understand why he perceives it that way. Bottom line, it all comes down to numbers, profit, tax write-offs, and winning government favor.
Quote:
If Negroponte's program is purely humanitarian and only to benefit children, why would for-profit companies pursue the same goal? ...the potential number of kids who could get laptops is over a billion, a fact which has not gone unnoticed by Intel and other hi-tech companies.

And...
Quote:
To prove that Intel has targeted his machine, Negroponte gave us some documents Intel sent to the government of Nigeria.

When Stahl shows those documents to Barrett, he says, "This is an Intel marketing document – there’s no question about that."

One document outlines the “shortcomings of the One Laptop Per Child approach” and lists the supposedly stronger points of the Classmate.

"So somebody at Intel sees this as direct competition, clearly," Stahl says to the Intel chairman. "Well, someone at Intel was comparing the Classmate pc with another device being offered in the marketplace," Barrett responds. "That’s the way our business works."
Not really, that's the way Intel works.

It's a shame that Intel just can't donate the low cost laptops to Negroponte so he could use his existing network and follow the One Laptop Per Child program. But then again, there's no profit or government favor if the laptops are donated, Intel would be stuck with a substantial tax write-off. In the dash to gain market share and get the Intel brand out into another market niche, the unfortunate losers are going to be the very children Intel intends to help.
a c 108 à CPUs
May 21, 2007 1:31:03 PM

Yeah . . . I saw it.

Anyone who defends Intel dumping a product below price to put Nicholas Negroponte out of business is lower than whale poop. Craig Barrett looked rather **shifty** when presented with the hard-copy evidence.

It just goes to show you how vicious a corporation can be with their attempts to damage a competitor.

And that really is a cool idea that Negroponte has. Sign me up, Nicholas!
May 21, 2007 1:40:37 PM

I don't believe a word out of this guy's mouth and it doesn't have jack to do with Intel. He says there's no profit in it at all but then gets upset when someone else has a cheaper and supposed better laptop for children that smells fishy to me. He says he needs 3 million orders to be able to make them in bulk at 176 dollars a laptop that's $528,000,000 it's easy to see why he's becoming upset with Intel. He's clearly making some money in there somewhere.

Heaven forbid someone like Intel wanting to jump on that bandwagon I mean making money is such an evil thing after all.
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 1:41:56 PM

Quote:
Let me see if I have your complaint correct...
1) Someone started a program to sell cheap system to third world countries in hopes of raising the computer literacy rate in those areas.
2) Another company had the audacity of offering one of those countries an even cheaper alternative.

I fail to see the problem here. It sounds like a win win situation for the kids in these areas. At a cheaper price, the governments are even more likely to go along with purchasing the systems for the kids in their countries. Hopefully, they will buy even more of them at this cheaper price. Since that is Dr. Negroponte's stated goal, what is the error? Is he just annoyed the someone else is the one to do it? Is he worried that someone may steal some of his spotlight or headlines?


I was thinking the same thing. Sounds like he wants to be the one in the limelight. Or he's catching some major kickbacks from people to do it and is worrying about his honeydew pot drying out.

You miss the point. The One Laptop Per Laptop effort is not-for-profit. Not-for-profit companies only recoup enough to cover expenses. The laptops are given away to the children, not sold. Intel wants to make a profit on the effort, that is not a win-win for the countries or people's having to pay for them. Dell makes a cheap laptop, why not just tell the 3rd world countries to order one from www.dell.com?!

If you read about the project, Negroponte went to Intel for support and they pretty much told him to go pound sand. Negroponte found alternatives to make the project happen. Now that the project has seen some success and Negroponte has proven that it will work, Intel is attempting to railroad and capitalize on the effort.

Why can't Intel just donate the low cost laptops to the One Chil Per Laptop program? Why are they peddling influence and marketing materials to the same countries Negroponte is working in?

To think Intel's primary motivation is a humanitarian effort is just niave. For Intel it is about profit, government favor, peddling influence, and tax incentives.
May 21, 2007 1:45:45 PM

Why can't AMD donate? Fuck it, Intel saw it would work and decide to get in on it. Pardon me for being a cynic.
May 21, 2007 1:49:17 PM

Quote:
Let me see if I have your complaint correct...
1) Someone started a program to sell cheap system to third world countries in hopes of raising the computer literacy rate in those areas.
2) Another company had the audacity of offering one of those countries an even cheaper alternative.

I fail to see the problem here. It sounds like a win win situation for the kids in these areas. At a cheaper price, the governments are even more likely to go along with purchasing the systems for the kids in their countries. Hopefully, they will buy even more of them at this cheaper price. Since that is Dr. Negroponte's stated goal, what is the error? Is he just annoyed the someone else is the one to do it? Is he worried that someone may steal some of his spotlight or headlines?


I was thinking the same thing. Sounds like he wants to be the one in the limelight. Or he's catching some major kickbacks from people to do it and is worrying about his honeydew pot drying out.

If you read about the project, Negroponte went to Intel for support and they pretty much told him to go pound sand. Negroponte found alternatives to make the project happen. Now that the project has seen some success and Negroponte has proven that it will work, Intel is attempting to railroad and capitalize on the effort.

Why can't Intel just donate the low cost laptops to the One Chil Per Laptop program? Why are they peddling influence and marketing materials to the same countries Negroponte is working in?

To think Intel's primary motivation is a humanitarian effort is just niave. For Intel it is about profit, government favor, peddling influence, and tax incentives.
Oh no doubt it's about making money just unlike most people here I don't think making money makes someone evil. Let me find out Intel is killing people and doing car bombings or using weapons of mass destruction to make money then I'll care about the company making money. Are they being immoral perhaps but your talking about a half a billion dollar deal someone's feelings is going to get hurt when dealing with that much money and at the end of the day I doubt it's going to be Intel.
May 21, 2007 2:02:59 PM

Oouh how horribly of them. I suggest changing the title to "Intel kills little children" and don´t forget to post the PR archive footage of a black, starving, nigerian child with fleas on his head...

If i would work for some revolver magazine where big letters equate information, truth and sales i´d hire you in no time.
May 21, 2007 2:03:36 PM

No offense, but you're just arbitrarily limiting the frame of the description of someone's actions to what is directly observable. If you don't feed your child properly, for instance, you haven't necessarily "killled" them, but I think nonetheless we can say that your actions are awful.

Now, making money is morally arbitrary, I take it. It's how you make it that matters. If, by 'merely' making money, you systematically hold people back in a state of poverty whereby people will die that otherwise would have lived, I'm not sure why that's somehow far more acceptable than just lining them up and shooting 1 in 5. I'll grant you that Intel haven't done anything quite that bad, but it's still not exactly morally clean, is it?

I recommend 'Lord of War' as an excellent exploration of these issues. I don't know the answers myself, but I like people to think about them.
May 21, 2007 2:06:16 PM

Quote:
On 60 Minutes last night (the news show your grandparents watch) - about the initiative to get laptops to children in poor countries.

Here are some quotes:



Nicholas Negroponte, a professor at MIT, had a dream. In it every child on the planet had his own computer. In that way, he figured, children from the most impoverished places – from deserts and jungles and slums could become educated and part of the modern world. Poor kids would have new possibilities.


Quote:

But lately One Laptop has had to contend with a new challenge: competition. This lab in Sao Paulo is testing two other laptops the Brazilian government is thinking of buying for school children, including one made in India and Negroponte’s biggest competitor: the Classmate by Intel, the giant chip maker.


Intel gave every student in this class in Mexico a Classmate – which Negroponte believes is part of an effort to kill him off.

At a recent lecture at MIT he accused Intel of dumping, of going to the same governments he’s trying to sell to and offering the Classmate below cost.

"Intel should be ashamed of itself," Negroponte says. "It’s just – it’s just shameless."

'nuff said.

"Negroponte believes that you’re trying to drive him out," Stahl told Craig Barrett, Intel’s Chairman of the Board.


Quote:
... the heart of it is that the One Laptop uses chips made by AMD, Intel’s biggest competitor.

"Intel and AMD fight viciously," Negroponte says." And we’re just sort of caught in the middle."


Quote:
"Yes, Intel has hurt the mission enormously," Negroponte says.




http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/05/20/60minutes/printable2830058.shtml
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 2:06:33 PM

Quote:
Why can't AMD donate? Fuck it, Intel saw it would work and decide to get in on it. Pardon me for being a cynic.


C'mon...lighten up.
Quote:
What is AMD’s financial contribution to the One Laptop Per Child project (formerly known as the MIT $100 laptop project)?

AMD has agreed to contribute $2M to help fund development, R&D for future improvements, and grants to help ensure the OLPC laptop reaches those who need it most.

No such admission from Intel. 'Nuff said...
May 21, 2007 2:10:46 PM

Quote:

I recommend 'Lord of War' as an excellent exploration of these issues. I don't know the answers myself, but I like people to think about them.


Hollywood and Nicolas Cage aren´t Reporters, Scientists or anything else that even remotely enables them to produce somethng of documetary worth. Watching cartoons would probably be a better source for moral themed topics. :lol: 
May 21, 2007 2:11:40 PM

Quote:
Why can't AMD donate? Fuck it, Intel saw it would work and decide to get in on it. Pardon me for being a cynic.


From what I understand AMD is one of the main parties behind the initiative.

http://www.laptop.org/
a c 108 à CPUs
May 21, 2007 2:15:57 PM

All these attempts to defend Intel are just plain insulting and ludicrous and absurd.
May 21, 2007 2:21:14 PM

Please read what you quote! Notice how I put "Exploration of these issues"? The dispute is not a factual one, so scientists, reporters etc. are irrelevant. The point is that 'merely' making money can be one of the most horrific things a human being can do.
a c 108 à CPUs
May 21, 2007 2:27:31 PM

AMD provided seed money for the program when it started @ MIT . . .

One Laptop Per Child

Note the lack of a GLARING AMD INSIDE LOGO

The idea is to generate a suffient number of orders to reduce the actual cost below $100. The last time I heard it was somewhere around $130 per unit.
May 21, 2007 2:28:22 PM

Quote:
If Intel is selling these below costs I would think that means they are making them @ a loss which to me just screams big tax write off. No real surprise though.


Yeah I'm sure AMD isn't writing off any of their donations to this guy either.
May 21, 2007 2:37:02 PM

It's not about the cost of the laptop.... Desktop, whatever. It's the cost of the infrastructure. What would it cost to put every child in sub-saharan Africa online, even at the most basic data rates? ie, 2400 baud modem...

You can give every child in the world a computer fairly cheaply. Bill Gates could do it all by himself. But it they don't have the power to run it off of, and if they do don't have a way to interconnect, then its no better than a good solar powered scientific calculator.

That's the crux of the problem, so quit whinging about amd vs. intel and the poor kiddies.... Bring in the big guns, the Ciscos, Junipers, SonyEricssons, Nokias, etc. and get a meshed comms network that is useful and cheap.

Without a comms system, your most powerful cpu is useless.

My 2p...
May 21, 2007 2:39:24 PM

Quote:
If Intel is selling these below costs I would think that means they are making them @ a loss which to me just screams big tax write off. No real surprise though.


Yeah I'm sure AMD isn't writing off any of their donations to this guy either.

Umm read the whole post before you comment. I said AMD is probably getting one as well for the money it has donated. :roll:

You didn't say anything about that. I can't help it if you edited your post to reflect that. I did read your whole post at the time and commented. No harm no foul though.
May 21, 2007 2:44:30 PM

I think it's all BS. As if these kids (in third-world countries) need a computer....they need food, shelter, and medications/vaccinations. $130 would probably feed a kid for 6months-a year. :x :x
a c 108 à CPUs
May 21, 2007 2:45:07 PM

No offense . . . but this is the point.

Using open-source sustainable efficient technology to educate billions of children in the third world.

The more orders that are generated further drives down the cost allowing for the production and distribution of more technology.

The *idea* of a profit or promotional motive introduced into the mission of OLPC is so . . . Intel . . . .
May 21, 2007 2:50:47 PM

I tend to be somewhat of a cynic, in that a persons "good intentions" may also hold a "hidden agenda". That being said, let's give Mr. Negroponte the benefit of the doubt, if he indeed rests his ambitions on humanitarian efforts to help poor children further their education by offering the $100 laptop - Kudo's to Mr. Negroponte.

If Intel had the same intent as Negroponte, the seemingly obvious solution would be to contact Mr. Negroponte and begin discussions on "how does Intel become involved with your cause - we find it has merit and would provide you our product to help you manufacture the system much cheaper".

I am being overly simplistic in my theory, but it is pretty obvious that Intel's interest in One Laptop per Child is less than charitable. There is an agenda that Intel has, and yes the end result will be too push Negroponte out. The great sadness is that a large powerful corporation is targeting someone else's idea - or better yet dream to further some agenda, with the end result being the ruin of a single persons charitable idea. Much the way that a High School bully steals the 5th graders lunch money.

WOW, what a world we live in.
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 3:11:12 PM

Quote:
Yeah I'm sure AMD isn't writing off any of their donations to this guy either.


Getting a tax write-off for donating funds is far different from direct selling for profit.
May 21, 2007 3:15:11 PM

Quote:
You miss the point. The One Laptop Per Laptop effort is not-for-profit. Not-for-profit companies only recoup enough to cover expenses.
Not-for-profit doesn't mean that no one is making money. I suggest that you check Google for the salaries of the people running these not-for-profit companies, I think that you would be appalled. I'm not saying that Negroponte isn't sincere but just because it's a non-profit company doesn't mean diddle squat.
May 21, 2007 3:16:06 PM

I believe in the end we could all argue this subject till we are blue in the face. I whole heartedly agree that every child should have a lap top it's a great idea but I'm not going to get upset because Intel is trying to do it too regardless of their means or reasons for it. I guess I just believe too much that the ends justify the means.
May 21, 2007 3:20:31 PM

Quote:
I recommend 'Lord of War' as an excellent exploration of these issues. I don't know the answers myself, but I like people to think about them.
Do my eyes deceive me or are you actually suggesting that we use Hollywood to give us any insight on anything :?: Now I have seen it all :!:
May 21, 2007 3:26:30 PM

I hear your disdain, but you've provided no reasons to back it up. Once again, the issue is not a factual one, but whether one can really distinguish the money-making from the effects, and what the moral consequences should be. I don't see why a film that is made in some region of California should be considered exempt from making valid contributions to this topic. Perhaps you might offer some reasons?
May 21, 2007 3:35:36 PM

Quote:
I hear your disdain, but you've provided no reasons to back it up. Once again, the issue is not a factual one, but whether one can really distinguish the money-making from the effects, and what the moral consequences should be. I don't see why a film that is made in some region of California should be considered exempt from making valid contributions to this topic. Perhaps you might offer some reasons?
Films in hollywood are all about making money. The same evil that sparked this thread. :) 
May 21, 2007 3:40:39 PM

two things to say about this

1)If Legrowhateverhisnameis is so passionate about getting computer literacy to kids why would he be so adamant about selling only HIS laptops to them? If the same "dream" he has is being fulfilled by someone else wouldn't he be thankful, dare I say grateful? Yeah he was treated like shit by a large corporation but so are most people.

2)I am not an intel fanboy, I always prefered AMD till the C2D's came out but you can't really take Intel to task over them using tax write off's to help others and help themselves at the same time. Most not-for-profits use those same tax write off laws to fund their operations. Whether it is getting donated goods for tax writeoffs, getting cash donations, vehicle donations, whatever it is most of those donations are recieved from people with Tax writeoffs in mind. I work in a not-for-profit organization and i can tell you most people would not donate their vehicle\house\boat\whatever without the tax writeoff there. Intel saw an opportunity to get some good PR, save some money, and help some people and they took it. Unfortunately they stepped on some peoples toes to do it but it isn't like they are the only ones doing it. Nonprofits are always stepping on each others toes as well as having others step on theirs. It has gotten so bad some people are starting to treat NPO's as a business and are using business tactics when the whole idea of an NPO is to help others. It is sad but it is life. There are lots of others things worse going on, I don't think we need to feel sorry because one computer company is helping poor children better than a smaller NPO.
May 21, 2007 3:52:48 PM

Quote:
I hear your disdain, but you've provided no reasons to back it up. Once again, the issue is not a factual one, but whether one can really distinguish the money-making from the effects, and what the moral consequences should be. I don't see why a film that is made in some region of California should be considered exempt from making valid contributions to this topic. Perhaps you might offer some reasons?


You are kidding, right? We are talking about Hollywood aren't we? If I have to give you any reasons other than it's Hollywood, then discussing this point any further would be an effort in futility. Hollywood... get it?
May 21, 2007 3:56:40 PM

Quote:
I hear your disdain, but you've provided no reasons to back it up. Once again, the issue is not a factual one, but whether one can really distinguish the money-making from the effects, and what the moral consequences should be. I don't see why a film that is made in some region of California should be considered exempt from making valid contributions to this topic. Perhaps you might offer some reasons?
Films in hollywood are all about making money. The same evil that sparked this thread. :)  It's not about the fact that they are all about making money, it's about the fact that they are all dumber than bricks.

Edit: I'm sorry for making such a sweeping generalization, I know it's wrong. Let me revise that to 98% are dumber than bricks
May 21, 2007 3:56:41 PM

I understand that. Hollywood could make donating money for starving kids look like the most horrible thing possible. Got it?
May 21, 2007 3:57:03 PM

Exitus acta probat

If we really care about the CHILDREN here, we should be happy that Intel is offering these laptops EVEN CHEAPER than the OLPC project. After all, we're talking about what's best for the children, correct? If their governments can now afford more of these Intel laptops because of the reduced price, which Intel is supposedly taking A LOSS on each (how does that = profit, people?), that means more children can now receive a laptop, or that their governments have more money left over for FAR MORE IMPORTANT THINGS, such as improving sewer, agriculture, telecommunications, roadways, and immunizations.

Yes, this all sounds very evil. Those poor children. I guess their governments would rather serve in the best interest of the people than support morality and open source. Dumb bastards. :roll:
May 21, 2007 4:04:25 PM

Quote:

If we really care about the CHILDREN here, we should be happy that Intel is offering these laptops EVEN CHEAPER than the OLPC project. After all, we're talking about what's best for the children, correct? If their governments can now afford more of these Intel laptop because of the reduced price, which Intel is supposedly taking A LOSS on each (how does that = profit, people?), that means more children can now receive a laptop, or that their governments have more money left over for FAR MORE IMPORTANT THINGS, such as improving sewer, agriculture, telecommunications, roadways, and immunizations.


I was just about to type that when i read your post. Thanks you for bringing some more reason to this naive and simple-minded thread.

Quote:

Yes, this all sounds very evil. Those poor children. I guess their governments would rather serve in the best interest of the people than support morality and open source. Dumb bastards. :roll:


Indeed. Those self-proclaimed "improve the world" semi-intellectuals that see evil everywhere make me sick.
May 21, 2007 4:29:00 PM

And Intel kiled Kenny too. The Bastards!
May 21, 2007 4:36:24 PM

I agree with you there Joe. Since one company was dontating the computers to the children, and the other is selling computers to the governments of these contries at below cost (less than profit) for the children, (If I understood the way they both work.) then it seems to me a way to get a lot more computers into the hands of children. (All the dontated ones, plus the ones sold by Intel.) I don't see why you can't do both.
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 4:51:17 PM

Quote:
You miss the point. The One Laptop Per Laptop effort is not-for-profit. Not-for-profit companies only recoup enough to cover expenses.
Not-for-profit doesn't mean that no one is making money. I suggest that you check Google for the salaries of the people running these not-for-profit companies, I think that you would be appalled. I'm not saying that Negroponte isn't sincere but just because it's a non-profit company doesn't mean diddle squat.

Ok, Johnny-come-lately, of course people have to make a living, don't be stupid. You can't deny a man's right to earn a living, but I doubt Dr. Negroponte's lifestyle is anything like that of Paul Otellini or Craig Barrett. Please feel free to post some stats or links of the non-profit companies and the salaries, including OLPC.
May 21, 2007 4:59:56 PM

You Intel fanboys are fucking RETARDS.

Intel knows exactly what they are doing. They are dumping an alternative out there to drive out the competition before they can reach a critical mass to make the project viable. But a simple minded Intel dick sucking fanboy cannot understand this.

This is modus operandi for Intel though, so no surprise at all.
a b à CPUs
May 21, 2007 5:07:17 PM

Quote:
Exitus acta probat

If we really care about the CHILDREN here, we should be happy that Intel is offering these laptops EVEN CHEAPER than the OLPC project. After all, we're talking about what's best for the children, correct? If their governments can now afford more of these Intel laptops because of the reduced price, which Intel is supposedly taking A LOSS on each (how does that = profit, people?), that means more children can now receive a laptop, or that their governments have more money left over for FAR MORE IMPORTANT THINGS, such as improving sewer, agriculture, telecommunications, roadways, and immunizations.

Yes, this all sounds very evil. Those poor children. I guess their governments would rather serve in the best interest of the people than support morality and open source. Dumb bastards. :roll:


Will Intel invest in the countries infrastructure or install generators to power the laptops they sell? Will they construct schools and classrooms so the children can learn to use the laptops? Will they leave Intel employees on site to offer support and guidance? Or, will they pocket the cash from the sale and walk away?

Putting a laptop into a kids hands is one thing, leaving behind a legacy to support ongoing learning and education is another.
May 21, 2007 5:13:15 PM

Quote:
I think it's all BS. As if these kids (in third-world countries) need a computer....they need food, shelter, and medications/vaccinations. $130 would probably feed a kid for 6months-a year. :x :x


Yes they do need those things you mentioned but if they are to ever to get out of poverty then they are going to have to have an education and these laptops could help to provide that. Really the governments of these countries need to step up and provide for their people.


Give a man a fish.....

Teach a man how to fish......
May 21, 2007 5:19:16 PM

Quote:
You Intel fanboys are ****** RETARDS.

Intel knows exactly what they are doing. They are dumping an alternative out there to drive out the competition before they can reach a critical mass to make the project viable. But a simple minded Intel dick sucking fanboy cannot understand this.

This is modus operandi for Intel though, so no surprise at all.


I'm glad I didn't say that. Though I can say that it is really low to try and sabotage the project when it's well known that Negroponte approached Intel about it and didn't get in the door

Now that all of these countries are thinking about it to put out press materials saying "Screw that thing, it's crap. Ours is what you want" is the bottom of the barrel.

But then like you said,

Par for the course for Intel.
May 21, 2007 5:27:27 PM

Quote:
I think it's all BS. As if these kids (in third-world countries) need a computer....they need food, shelter, and medications/vaccinations. $130 would probably feed a kid for 6months-a year. :x :x


+1.

Can I overclock the OLPC? Oh, no.... *stops giving a damn about the project*

Why is this even in CPUs? It isn't a CPU, it's hardly even a PC. Try running Alan Wake on it.
May 21, 2007 5:27:35 PM

Quote:
I'm glad I didn't say that. Though I can say that it is really low to try and sabotage the project when it's well known that Negroponte approached Intel about it and didn't get in the door

Of course it's about sabotage. If Intel was actually interested in helping the project, why would they release their own unit? They could just supply processors, wireless parts etc. to use in the existing units. There is NO need to build a whole new unit.

Intel can't stand the prospect of millions of units out there without their name on it. They could give two shits about actually helping anyone. Their actions prove this. Not that AMD is totally innocent, but this is just another example of Intel saying, "oh shit AMD is trying to get a leg up in another segment, we better pull more dirty stab you in the back tactics to put on a halt on it"
May 21, 2007 5:28:45 PM

Quote:
Will Intel invest in the countries infrastructure or install generators to power the laptops they sell? Will they construct schools and classrooms so the children can learn to use the laptops? Will they leave Intel employees on site to offer support and guidance? Or, will they pocket the cash from the sale and walk away?

Putting a laptop into a kids hands is one thing, leaving behind a legacy to support ongoing learning and education is another.


What is stopping Mr. Negroponte from continuing his project? As it was said, if he cares so much about the people then why isn't he happy someone came in and did part of the work (provide laptops)? He can still provide generators and classrooms for the children or he can move on to another country and help them.

Do firemen get angry when someone else comes and rescues victims in a burning building robbing them of the glory? If they do, why? If they don't, why?
May 21, 2007 5:35:11 PM

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No offense . . . but this is the point.


The point is to drive the cost down to be affordable (<$100 in 2008) to third world countries.

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Using open-source sustainable efficient technology to educate billions of children in the third world.


Linux is the answer and it runs on Intel or AMD so what's the point. Oh your point may be Intel uses a Windows system for the classmate like virtually all of the business world. Or maybe your point is that the AMD based processor will only run a modified kernel of Linux because of hardware limitations.

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The more orders that are generated further drives down the cost allowing for the production and distribution of more technology.


That is Intel's purpose to introduce competition and drive prices down through economies of scale their's however, not AMD's.

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The *idea* of a profit or promotional motive introduced into the mission of OLPC is so . . . Intel . . . .


Amd is not magnamously donating 5-15M chips per year for this program they make a profit on each chip sold so why not have Intel doing the same thing they have better fabrication technology and can produce at lower costs than AMD. Negroponte is pissed off that Intel is stealing away his business because that is what it is BUSINESS Non-profit or for-profit it's just business.
May 21, 2007 5:36:19 PM

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What is stopping Mr. Negroponte from continuing his project?

You don't understand the process. To make the project viable, a certain economy of scale must be reached. Intel is trying to stop this from happening. They can do this by offering an even lower priced unit (sold at a huge loss no doubt) so the various governments purchase the Intel version instead (why wouldn't they, after all it is cheaper)

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do firemen get angry when someone else comes and rescues victims in a burning building robbing them of the glory? If they do, why? If they don't, why?

Terrible example.
May 21, 2007 5:36:33 PM

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Intel can't stand the prospect of millions of units out there without their name on it. They could give two shits about actually helping anyone. Their actions prove this. Not that AMD is totally innocent, but this is just another example of Intel saying, "oh **** AMD is trying to get a leg up in another segment, we better pull more dirty stab you in the back tactics to put on a halt on it"


A possibility is, that someone at intel, after doing some math, just doesn´t believe that the project will succeed and that a free, competing market may be the better solution. And the marketing department at AMD might have come to the conclusion that doing a this "charity" project would be the cheapest and most effective marketing campaign they ever had.

I don´t know it, but it could be.

It´s not stabbing anyone in the back. It´s just a free market. If Intel would just let AMD make this deals, well, they just could gift all of their facilities and money to AMD, well, after being eaten alive by their shareholders - it would be faster that way.

Communism and central market planning doesn´t work. Wake up.
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